Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Multiple images for one sheet printing - how to layout for editing individually?  (Read 804 times)

Dinarius

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1031

I want to print a triptych onto one sheet of paper.

Creating a canvas in Photoshop CS6 (which is what I use) and dropping the three images onto it is no problem.

But, the images are very different from one another.

So, after a test print is made, I want to be able to tweak any one of the images separately, if necessary.

So, how (in baby steps, please!  ;) ) do I layout the three images so that they can be edited individually?

Many thanks.

D.
Logged

pegelli

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1600
    • http://pegelli.smugmug.com/

Keep the three images you add to the canvas on separate layers (for W10: ctrl+A, crtl+C on the image you want to show and then crtl+V on the canvas, then move the image you copied on there to the right spot and don't flatten) After that you can edit each layer individually to your liking.

Logged
pieter, aka pegelli

Garnick

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 756

First - Everything Pieter mentioned.  Definitely do NOT flatten the file after adding all of the images.  You can easily make all of the necessary adjustments to each individual image.  Just remember to clip all adjustment layers to the specific image you are working on.  Otherwise, any adjustments will also affect all layers below the one you are adjusting.  I quite often receive story boards for printing from my customers.  Those files are flattened, and the very seldom are the images properly adjusted to match each other.  In that case I simply use the Marquee tool to "cut out" the individual images and apply them to a separate layer for making the proper adjustments.  And of course you could open all three images and make the proper adjustments before moving them to the triptych.  If I have individual images to work with that's always my preferred procedure.

Gary

 
 
Logged
LuLa - The source of ALL! -- "There's nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept" -- Ansel Adams
Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

Dinarius

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1031

Thanks for the replies.

Image files are 34cms wide.

So, I have created a blank (white) canvas that is 2 x 34cms + 30cms = 98cms.

This will mean that the images will sit 10cms from the edge of the paper at either side and 10cms between the images in the middle.

My problem is; when I drag one of the images onto the 98cms blank canvas, it appears very small on it. It's not taking up almost a third of the canvas, as it should.

Why is this?

Thanks.

D.
Logged

Dinarius

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1031

Ps. How do I "clip" an adjustment layer to make it specific to one of the images and not the other?

Thanks!

D.
Logged

Garnick

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 756

Thanks for the replies.

Image files are 34cms wide.

So, I have created a blank (white) canvas that is 2 x 34cms + 30cms = 98cms.

This will mean that the images will sit 10cms from the edge of the paper at either side and 10cms between the images in the middle.

My problem is; when I drag one of the images onto the 98cms blank canvas, it appears very small on it. It's not taking up almost a third of the canvas, as it should.

Why is this?

Thanks.

D.

Hello Dinarius,

This is a rather common issue, and one that's easily fixed.  All you have to do is make sure all of the images and the canvas have the same resolution.  In other words, if you were to drag a 150ppi resolution image into a 300ppi resolution canvas it would be half the size you expected.  Of course you could use "Free Transform"(under "Edit) and resize the image in the canvas, but that's not the best way to approach the problem.  The previous procedure is the best, make sure all images are the same res as the canvas. 

"How do I "clip" an adjustment layer to make it specific to one of the images and not the other?"  In PS CS6 and later, at the bottom left edge of the Adjustment dialog is an arrow that points downward.  Click that arrow and the adjustment layer will affect only the layer is is clipped to. Below is a screenshot of the arrow I'm referring to, lower left corner of the dialog.


Logged
LuLa - The source of ALL! -- "There's nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept" -- Ansel Adams
Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

Dinarius

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1031

Thanks!  ;)

I knew the bit about the dpi but, of course, I'd forgotten it since the last time I did this.

The clip trick is neat!

Thanks again.

D.
Logged

Mark D Segal

  • Contributor
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11369
    • http://www.markdsegal.com

Another way of doing this is to edit each of the photos individually (i.e. as separate photos on their own), make sure as Gary mentioned that the resolution is the same for all of them and for the Background layer. Dimension the photos individually for the size you want them to be in the final montage. Then do a temporary "Merge Layers" for each. Then create a new Background file and click-drag the finished photos into it, placing them using the move tool with the grid switched on for accurate placement. This way you don't need to create a hierarchy of clipped layers to their bespoke files and concern yourself with correct layer placement on the canvas to be printed. And you preserve individual adjusted copies of the photos without needing to save the composite. The downside of this approach is that if you then want to amend anything, you need to remove the photo to be amended from the montage, un-merge its Layers, do the amendment of that photo and then re-merge and re-drag it into the composite canvas. When finished, to preserve the Layers of each photo, undo the Merge Layers, Save and Close.

Frankly, the only thing I print out of Photoshop these days is printer evaluation targets that need Absolute Rendering Intent. Everything else I print from Lightroom. It's just so much easier and more seamless between editing and printing. I make composites in Lr all the time. What's really nice is that if when you put several related photos into the same canvas, and you see that for sake of certain kinds of consistency between them, adjustments need to be made to one or the other, in Lr you just flip back to the Develop module, make the adjustments, they convey automatically into the Print module and you're done. Now if you absolutely want to continue printing from Photoshop, so be it, not saying not to, but just suggesting that there are other, ostensibly easier ways.
Logged
Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....."

Dinarius

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1031

Another way of doing this is to edit each of the photos individually (i.e. as separate photos on their own), make sure as Gary mentioned that the resolution is the same for all of them and for the Background layer. Dimension the photos individually for the size you want them to be in the final montage. Then do a temporary "Merge Layers" for each. Then create a new Background file and click-drag the finished photos into it, placing them using the move tool with the grid switched on for accurate placement. This way you don't need to create a hierarchy of clipped layers to their bespoke files and concern yourself with correct layer placement on the canvas to be printed. And you preserve individual adjusted copies of the photos without needing to save the composite. The downside of this approach is that if you then want to amend anything, you need to remove the photo to be amended from the montage, un-merge its Layers, do the amendment of that photo and then re-merge and re-drag it into the composite canvas. When finished, to preserve the Layers of each photo, undo the Merge Layers, Save and Close.

Frankly, the only thing I print out of Photoshop these days is printer evaluation targets that need Absolute Rendering Intent. Everything else I print from Lightroom. It's just so much easier and more seamless between editing and printing. I make composites in Lr all the time. What's really nice is that if when you put several related photos into the same canvas, and you see that for sake of certain kinds of consistency between them, adjustments need to be made to one or the other, in Lr you just flip back to the Develop module, make the adjustments, they convey automatically into the Print module and you're done. Now if you absolutely want to continue printing from Photoshop, so be it, not saying not to, but just suggesting that there are other, ostensibly easier ways.

Mark,

Thanks for the alternative suggestion.

I'm strictly Capture One now, so I'll stick to CS6 for printing.

Also, all my printing (at least on this scale - roll) is done off-site.

So, easier to bring a USB with an unflattened file.

D.

Ps. After creating the blank background canvas, when I pasted in a file, it landed exactly in the middle. By highlighting it, I could move it left or right, to its exact final position, using the left/right arrow keys, rather than clicking and dragging. Much more accurate for fine placement. Probably screamingly obvious to the rest of you, but I thought I'd share it anyway.
Logged

Doug Gray

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1299

If you convert the dropped images to "smart images" you can edit each individually and resize at will without loss. I think Adobe has some videos on it.
Logged

Garnick

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 756

If you convert the dropped images to "smart images" you can edit each individually and resize at will without loss. I think Adobe has some videos on it.

Yes, I use Smart Images a lot for that purpose, but completely forgot to mention it.  Although usually if I'm constructing a layout with specifically sized images, I tend to size them previous to adding to the layout.  One less step in the layout, and I know I have the size correct without using grids or guides. However, I suppose it's just another example of 6 of one, half dozen of the other.   ;)

Gary     
Logged
LuLa - The source of ALL! -- "There's nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept" -- Ansel Adams
Even though a big part of my life has been spent dealing with negatives, they generally end up being positives -- gan

BobShaw

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1165
    • Aspiration Images

For another completely different approach, just make the three images in Photoshop or whatever and use a printing programme to do the layout. If this is a once off them download Mirage Print free trial.
Logged
Website - http://AspirationImages.com
Portrait and Commercial Photography
Pages: [1]   Go Up