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Author Topic: Aurora shooting question  (Read 674 times)

armand

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Aurora shooting question
« on: January 17, 2018, 12:43:45 PM »

Never did but I plan to. For those who did, what exposure times should I expect?
Lets say in full frame equiv, F 2.8, ISO 800.
Im trying to decide if I need my full frame or I can get away with smaller sensors/ less bright lenses.
Thanks

E.J. Peiker

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Re: Aurora shooting question
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2018, 07:31:45 AM »

Unless it's a super bright aurora, ISO 800 may result in too slow of a shutter speed with an f/2.8 lens.  Aurora's are constantly moving things and if you want to see some structure in the aurora, not just a green sky, you'll want to keep your shutter speeds at 10 seconds or preferably even faster.  2 seconds gives you some stunning results in a good aurora but it requires very fast lenses and/or a higher ISO.  A bit of noise reduction if you go  high on ISO is generally not a problem since Aurora's don't have any fine detail.
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sdwilsonsct

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Re: Aurora shooting question
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2018, 11:17:53 AM »

Yes, aurora is very variable. I find that a 1 or APS-C sensor is fine for diffuse aurora:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/16040593227/in/album-72157631844540415/

But if you want to capture detail in bright, active aurora then a larger sensor and shorter exposure is good:
http://www.oliverwrightphotography.com/gallery/view/aurora-storm-by-teepee/travel

If you take the full-frame youll be covered. I get by with a 1 sensor.

armand

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Re: Aurora shooting question
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2018, 11:54:47 AM »

Thank you. I want to shoot some but what I've seen on the internet is quite variable. A good starting point seems to be full frame, ISO 800, F 2.8, 15 sec. From here higher ISO and shorter exposure times.
Just in case the sky is clear enough for astrophotography I'll probably get the Nikon D750 with Samyang 14 2.8 and Nikon 24 1.8G specifically for this, I should have enough room.
Even on APS-C I doubt I'll lose much at ISO 1600, after all I don't expect that much detail in a night shot.

sc_john

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Re: Aurora shooting question
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2018, 02:47:59 PM »

armand,

You might find some helpful info in this link: https://photographygloves.com/8-northern-lights-photography-tips/

Good luck!

John
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armand

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Re: Aurora shooting question
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2018, 06:01:47 PM »

armand,

You might find some helpful info in this link: https://photographygloves.com/8-northern-lights-photography-tips/

Good luck!

John

Awesome, thank you!
I already had a vague idea to have one camera shooting a timelapse while I take regular photos, this helps and I can see I should not have a road in the frame to avoid the cars driving through.
The portrait idea with a flash is very interesting too.
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