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Author Topic: Source for larger prints and framing question.  (Read 560 times)

ad9t

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Source for larger prints and framing question.
« on: January 10, 2018, 10:07:44 PM »

Last fall my dad purchased an Epson P800, and I ordered a roll of Canson Infinity Platine Fibre Rag. We have calibrated our monitors, and created a profile for the paper. The prints turned out great. Now, I want to make a larger print, and need to find a service bureau to work with.  I also have a question about framing.

The image I am working on is 6016x6259 pixels. I think I it will look good at 30x30 inches, and it might be okay at 40x40 inches. I would like to do the framing something like this piece by Adam Schallau’s. He placed an acrylic print inside a black linear liner, and used a large veneered frame from Larson. Before committing to this level of quality I want to be very confident in the results. Printing on paper or metal is also an option.

Roberts Photo is just around the corner from me. They will make prints on standard paper in the store, and can order metal prints. They have printed a few non-critical items for me, and the results were fine. However, I did not get the impression they are the right place to go for fine art printing. This is the same impression I get from 99% of the online printers. I would feel more confident with a printer that offers a variety of papers, and provides good ICC profiles. I would also like to be able to send 16 bit TIFF’s in ProPhoto RGB color space.  I would at least like a clear explanation of how to get my files from Lightroom to the printer with predictable high quality.

For acrylic prints, Nevada Art Printers provides ICC profiles and accepts large files. Bumblejax can provide ICC profiles, but only accepts 8 bit files. They prefer sRGB, but can accept other color spaces if embedded in the file. For paper and metal prints, I have not found a source that stands out to me. I would appreciate suggestions on printers to work with. A company in the Indianapolis area would be preferred.

Now my framing question. What is the preferred construction when a linear liner is used with a paper print? Is it acceptable to place the glass directly against the print? If not, what is used as a spacer?

Thanks
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mearussi

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Re: Source for larger prints and framing question.
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 08:31:53 AM »

Last fall my dad purchased an Epson P800, and I ordered a roll of Canson Infinity Platine Fibre Rag. We have calibrated our monitors, and created a profile for the paper. The prints turned out great. Now, I want to make a larger print, and need to find a service bureau to work with.  I also have a question about framing.


The image I am working on is 6016x6259 pixels. I think I it will look good at 30x30 inches, and it might be okay at 40x40 inches. I would like to do the framing something like this piece by Adam Schallau’s. He placed an acrylic print inside a black linear liner, and used a large veneered frame from Larson. Before committing to this level of quality I want to be very confident in the results. Printing on paper or metal is also an option.

For best quality divide by 300. For lesser, but still decent quality, divide by 200, but I wouldn't drop below 150 ppi. So I would suggest you stick to 30x30.

Roberts Photo is just around the corner from me. They will make prints on standard paper in the store, and can order metal prints. They have printed a few non-critical items for me, and the results were fine. However, I did not get the impression they are the right place to go for fine art printing. This is the same impression I get from 99% of the online printers. I would feel more confident with a printer that offers a variety of papers, and provides good ICC profiles. I would also like to be able to send 16 bit TIFF’s in ProPhoto RGB color space.  I would at least like a clear explanation of how to get my files from Lightroom to the printer with predictable high quality.

The ProPhoto color space will give you the best quality. Any service that won't accept it you shouldn't use. But 16 bit is not necessary. Once you have finished with all PP, saving and printing from a 8 bit highest quality jpeg will look just as good as a 16 bit tiff. So don't worry about Bumblejax only accepting 8 bit files. Their willingness to print from the ProPhoto color space is far more important.

For acrylic prints, Nevada Art Printers provides ICC profiles and accepts large files. Bumblejax can provide ICC profiles, but only accepts 8 bit files. They prefer sRGB, but can accept other color spaces if embedded in the file. For paper and metal prints, I have not found a source that stands out to me. I would appreciate suggestions on printers to work with. A company in the Indianapolis area would be preferred.

Since I live on the West Coast I'm only familiar with the printers here. For metal I'd use HDaluminum (https://www.hdaluminumprints.com/) a local printer in the Portland, OR area where I live. They are a small operation that does excellent quality work.

For a straight print I would use Carmel Fine Art Printing ( http://www.carmelfineartprinting.com/fine-art-papers-canvas/ ).
They offer a wide variety of papers including Platine, which I also used as my main paper for years until Canson came out with their new Baryta Prestige, which in my opinion looks even better (which they also offer).

BTW, metal prints are beautiful, but are incapable of duplicating the DR, gamut or resolution of a good paper print, but because they are so punchy very few care. A high quality paper print face mounted to acrylic will actually show better tonalities and finer details than metal and because it will be printed with pigments as opposed to dyes (dye sublimation is how metal prints are made) they will also have 3x the fade resistance of metal (approximately 60 years for metal vs 200+ years for the latest Epson prints from a 9000). 


Now my framing question. What is the preferred construction when a linear liner is used with a paper print? Is it acceptable to place the glass directly against the print? If not, what is used as a spacer?

Never place glass directly on the print as the moisture from the air will eventually cause the print to stick to the glass. A clear or black plastic spacer should be used in you don't want a mat. But when using this technique the print has to be glued to the backboard to remain flat.

If it were me and I wanted the best I would have my image printed on Canson's new Baryta Prestige (I've used Plantine for years but the Prestige looks even better) and have it face mounted to acrylic using 1/4" acrylic instead of the usual 1/8" as the extra depth really adds an extra dimensionality to the final image. Bumblejax doesn't seem to offer the Prestige but they do have a metal paper available which can help some images (but not those with lots of white in them, as the metallic look of the paper will cause whites to be dull).

Thankfully, I can print my own work so I would just provide them with my own prints and let them do the face mounting. And there are no doubt other printers that also offer acrylic face mounting and hopefully offer a wider paper selection.

But both metal and acrylic options are expensive. A less expensive option would be to just mount the print to black aluminum (leaving whatever size boarder you want) and then frame it using glass and the plastic spacer I mentioned earlier. It would still look nice, just not as punchy as ether metal or acrylic.

Good Luck


Thanks
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 08:44:08 AM by mearussi »
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Stephen Ray

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Re: Source for larger prints and framing question.
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 09:49:27 AM »

Recommended…

Nevada Art Printers for:  expert handling of your special file, production of the same print product used by Adam Schallau, gallery-quality framing, and protective shipping containers. I think their quality may exceed your expectations.

West Coast Imaging in Oakhurst, CA, Weldon Color Lab in Los Angeles, CA. Bow Haus Inc in L.A. for B&W.

All are dependable museum / gallery sources with outstanding quality.
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Deardorff

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Re: Source for larger prints and framing question.
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 05:08:39 PM »

You never put the print against the glazing, glass or acrylic. Spacers in the rabbit will keep it off the glass if you are not using matting to do so. Or a deep frame with the effect of a shadow box works well.

Bainbridge Alphamat or Alpharag for the backing is a good way to actively protect the artwork. If using wood framing you seal the rabbet with aluminized mylar tape to prevent outgassing which can harm an image.

Check on Conservation Framing and you will find more information that can help.
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fdi

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Re: Source for larger prints and framing question.
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2018, 03:25:25 PM »

As already mentioned, if you dont want the print to be damaged by the glass you need to keep it off the print with a spacer or mat. You will need something sturdy to act as the back of the frame. You can use Acid free foamcore which can also act as the mounting substrate. Uncut alphamat is not really any more archival for backing than acid free foamcore and you need to be careful to make sure the mat color has a smooth vellum surface and is not textured. If you want very archival then I would suggest you put a thin layer of 2-ply alpharag mat board between the print and the foamcoare backing. 8-ply alpharag board is strong enough to also act as the frame backing, but is much more expensive than the combination of 2-ply and foamcore.

Mounting and framing gets very expensive when the size exceeds 32x40 inches. Also, you may want to consider acrylic instead of glass if you go large.

Example 2-ply alpharag board:
https://www.framedestination.com/framing-supplies/mount-board/2-ply-alpharag.html
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Mark Rogers
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pearlstreet

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Re: Source for larger prints and framing question.
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2018, 06:22:30 PM »

I use Digital Silver Imaging in Boston. They are great printers and offer proofs before printing so you can see what you are getting.

http://digitalsilverimaging.com/
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