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Author Topic: How to display large printed images?  (Read 2035 times)

dchew

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    • Dave Chew Photography
Re: How to display large printed images?
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2018, 07:27:52 AM »

The secret to getting perfect results is to use a high-quality transfer adhesive.  This combined with the extremely smooth surface of the aluminum ensures a very strong bond and a glass-like finish for superb metallic c-type "paper".

I presume the other secret is to not have one of these lying around.

Dave

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Cornfield

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Re: How to display large printed images?
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2018, 11:24:25 AM »

Yes, a clean work area is important.  In the last few weeks, I have made a number of changes to my workspace removing carpets and curtains to help reduce dust.
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John Hollenberg

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Re: How to display large printed images?
« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2018, 07:43:43 PM »

Expensive, but having them mounted on an aluminium substrate such as Dibond is elegant, flat and durable. See my article Aluminium Composite about this process on this website.

Can anyone recommend a good place to have Dibond mounting done in Los Angeles?
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John Caldwell

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Re: How to display large printed images?
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2018, 10:14:16 AM »

For several years, prints that I make here are taken to a local graphics company, where the prints are mounted to Gator foam (1/2", 3/4" or 1" thickness), laminated with a satin product, edge banded with melamine, and treated on the rear face for hanging. Smaller prints such as 20" x 30" are routed on the rear face to accept typical hangers; large prints receive small block of wood on all four corners with eyelet screws.

The cost is quite low and the appearance, particularly when well lit, is quite good. The satin laminate detracts some from Dmax, contrast and overall punch, but it's not a killer. Post-printing costs for a 44" x 66" piece is about $180, just as an example.

Canson Baryta Photographique or Epson Legacy Baryta is the default paper, but some images look good on metallic paper. Metallic papers pop most with a glossy, rather than satin, laminate.

Archivists won't agree with this approach, but for *most* uses here, it's great. I rarely miss the days of matting, framing and Museum Glass.

John Caldwell
Pittsburgh, PA
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John Caldwell

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Re: How to display large printed images?
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2018, 10:18:27 AM »

I presume the other secret is to not have one of these lying around.

Dave

Hey, he matches the bedding! Beautiful.

John-
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