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Author Topic: High megapixels and the need for tripods.  (Read 984 times)

David Eckels

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Re: High megapixels and the need for tripods.
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2017, 07:20:48 PM »

Some times the best way to photograph is to simply slow down and think before pushing the button.

Great, great advice.

NancyP

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Re: High megapixels and the need for tripods.
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2017, 02:28:18 PM »

The habit of using a tripod for "best" shots is one that I am glad to have learned. I might fiddle with handheld shots for initial "working the scene", but when I have decided what I want, out comes the tripod. When I can't get the tripod, I shoot "burst" mode, and one of 6 or 7 shots might be good.
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BobShaw

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Re: High megapixels and the need for tripods.
« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2017, 04:48:55 PM »

I am surprised that a question on whether or not to use a tripod posted in a landscape forum got so many varied answers.
Even shooting in broad daylight I would use a tripod for serious shots.
You want the camera rock solid. Even many tripods move in the breeze.

You want to be shooting at the lowest ISO for noise (which is bad on high MP 35mm cameras)
You also want the smallest clean aperture like say f11 for depth of field. That probably only gives you a shutter of 1/100th second at best. At sunrise and sunset it is way slower.

You also want the mirror up a long time before the shot to stop the mirror shake. This definitely requires a tripod. One of the (many) great things about medium format is that you can lock the mirror up permanently with a button instead of menus. (Another is leaf shutters.)

You then want a cable release or time delay shutter to stop touching the camera at the moment of capture.

There are lots of other useful things, like a third hand to change lenses and filter, a place to put the camera while you wander around, as well as the reflection time already mentioned.
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luxborealis

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Re: High megapixels and the need for tripods.
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2017, 06:13:02 PM »

All the varied answers are the result of everyone putting in their 2 cents worth of advice, some of whom missed the point of the OPs question...

Of course you can shoot without a tripod. Iím sure even an 8x10 could be hand held. The question is fundamental, though: is there a relationship between the need for a tripod to maintain sharpness and increasing pixel density (or, perhaps more correctly, decreasing pixel size).

The answer is YES. With smaller pixels (higher map or pixel density or more pixels per unit area), use of a tripod is more helpful for maintaining sharpness. Is it necessary? Depends on your shooting style, your expectations, how much you pixel peep and print size.


I am surprised that a question on whether or not to use a tripod posted in a landscape forum got so many varied answers.
Even shooting in broad daylight I would use a tripod for serious shots.
You want the camera rock solid. Even many tripods move in the breeze.

You want to be shooting at the lowest ISO for noise (which is bad on high MP 35mm cameras)
You also want the smallest clean aperture like say f11 for depth of field. That probably only gives you a shutter of 1/100th second at best. At sunrise and sunset it is way slower.

You also want the mirror up a long time before the shot to stop the mirror shake. This definitely requires a tripod. One of the (many) great things about medium format is that you can lock the mirror up permanently with a button instead of menus. (Another is leaf shutters.)

You then want a cable release or time delay shutter to stop touching the camera at the moment of capture.

There are lots of other useful things, like a third hand to change lenses and filter, a place to put the camera while you wander around, as well as the reflection time already mentioned.
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Tony Jay

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Re: High megapixels and the need for tripods.
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2017, 11:55:45 PM »

All the varied answers are the result of everyone putting in their 2 cents worth of advice, some of whom missed the point of the OPs question...

Of course you can shoot without a tripod. Iím sure even an 8x10 could be hand held. The question is fundamental, though: is there a relationship between the need for a tripod to maintain sharpness and increasing pixel density (or, perhaps more correctly, decreasing pixel size).

The answer is YES. With smaller pixels (higher map or pixel density or more pixels per unit area), use of a tripod is more helpful for maintaining sharpness. Is it necessary? Depends on your shooting style, your expectations, how much you pixel peep and print size.
I agree with Terry - it all depends on one's expectations....

Me, I shoot with a high MP Sony (for landscapes anyway) AND I print big (A2+ minimum) and so IQ is of the utmost concern and priority - and so tripods, remote releases, heavy beanbags (draped over the camera), base ISO, and shutter speed (when possible) all get a workout to try and muscle IQ as much as is possible.

However, a lot of folks just want a nice low-res image to post on facebook or whatever - images that I bin would be just fine for this purpose, it just isn't my purpose...

Nonetheless, as Terry also points out, taking a slapdash approach to shooting with a high-megapixel camera is likely to disappoint - one simply cannot generally shoot with a 40 MP camera in the same way as one could with a 6 MP or 10 MP camera.
A Sony A7R series camera is smaller and lighter than any of the 6 MP or 10 MP cameras that I own from past days and by virtues of these facts lends itself to handholding - just not if IQ is the prime consideration...

Ultimately, a high megapixel camera demands careful attention to detail if one wants consistently high IQ - there is an envelope here which cannot be breached!
And, I think it is great - technique and craft still rule!!!

Tony Jay
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