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Author Topic: Limiting humidity effects in Panama  (Read 46165 times)

mshea

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Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« on: December 20, 2017, 04:09:08 PM »

Hi All,

I posted this in "Landscape Photography Locations" as well.

I'll be shooting a wedding on the west coast of Panama in early January. I want to avoid any potential problems with humidly, so I'll be placing most of my gear in separate ziplock bags with desiccant packs in each one. Does anyone have other recommendations regarding humidity, or general suggestions? I've never shot in that region before.

Thanks,
Merrill
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degrub

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Re: Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 05:07:09 PM »

see the reply in your other posting.
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thill1111

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Re: Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2017, 05:10:51 PM »

One thing to remember is when going outside from air conditioning to keep the camera inside the ziplock bag until it comes up to the outside temperature so that you avoid fogging in and on the lens (and even on the sensor).  It's the opposite situation from shooting in winter (in the northern areas) where it's cold and dry outside and warm and often more humid inside.  I've not had problems from just hot humid conditions when the camera isn't moving from cold/dry to hot/humid.
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uaiomex

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Re: Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2017, 09:40:34 AM »

Regarding going from a cold AC'd interior to hot humid ambience outside, if it happens that you don't have a zipbag or dissecant at hand, just keep all gear inside your camera bag for an hour or so. Of course, keep the bag as tight closed as possible. It really helps.

One thing to remember is when going outside from air conditioning to keep the camera inside the ziplock bag until it comes up to the outside temperature so that you avoid fogging in and on the lens (and even on the sensor).  It's the opposite situation from shooting in winter (in the northern areas) where it's cold and dry outside and warm and often more humid inside.  I've not had problems from just hot humid conditions when the camera isn't moving from cold/dry to hot/humid.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2017, 09:43:55 AM by uaiomex »
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mshea

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Re: Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 05:22:57 PM »

Thanks loads, folks! Good tips!

Merrill
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andyptak

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Re: Limiting humidity effects in Panama
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2018, 09:56:32 AM »

I work in the Caribbean and Mexico frequently and I would second all of the afore mentioned comments. In addition, I always keep my bag on the balcony of my hotel room and not inside. Keep it as close to the sliding door as possible in case it rains and throw a cushion and a towel on top for protection. Carry lots of lens wipes!
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