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Author Topic: What film?  (Read 2485 times)

pearlstreet

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What film?
« on: December 13, 2017, 02:12:56 PM »

I have some small contact prints my father took in England during WWII. Can anyone tell me what film this is from?
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 02:26:30 PM by Sharon VL »
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Rob C

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Re: What film?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2017, 02:38:10 PM »

Sharon, that needs Sherlock!

I assume you mean it's from part of a motion picture?

Rob

pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2017, 03:01:17 PM »

I have no idea. They are from a lot of different places so I doubt it's a motion picture. I wish I had the negatives. Some of them are really interesting.
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Rob C

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Re: What film?
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2017, 04:38:16 PM »

Looks to me like thatched roofs... if that narrows it down; but it probably is somewhere in England. To my surprise, I can't definitively say whether they existed north of the border - I certainly don't remember coming across them at any time, but neither would I claim to have been the sharpest eye in town.

But one thing: had these been shot on digital, would anybody have been able to reproduce the files today, whereas being film, it would be perfectly possible if they were available.

Perhaps an object lesson in keeping records, even if only on the back of a print!

Rob

pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 04:47:51 PM »

Rob is this Church recognizable to you? 
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petermfiore

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Re: What film?
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2017, 05:02:52 PM »

Rob is this Church recognizable to you?

Do you know what outfit your father was a part? From that you can research where they were assigned? Do you have specific dates?

Peter

pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2017, 05:06:48 PM »

My dad was 82nd Airborne. He was in every major battle in Europe except the Battle of the Bulge and during that battle he was on special assignment from Eisenhower. and spent time in England and the US.  I think these were taken then. I was curious what camera he might have been using as the format seems so odd to me.
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petermfiore

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Re: What film?
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2017, 05:12:38 PM »

My dad was 82nd Airborne. He was in every major battle in Europe except the Battle of the Bulge and during that battle he was on special assignment from Eisenhower. and spent time in England and the US.  I think these were taken then. I was curious what camera he might have been using as the format seems so odd to me.

As these are contact prints and looking at the size of the image, they appear to be from a 35 MM camera. Do you remember a camera that your dad may have had, early in your childhood?

Peter

Rob C

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Re: What film?
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2017, 05:13:02 PM »

Sharon,

Churches were not really my thing - but it strikes me as a bit ornate for Britain, but we'd need an architect's expertise to decide these things - or perhaps even a historian might have an idea. Isn't there some Google app that lets you feed in a picture and it returns similar ones? Could be the answer, but then again, with me you are dealing with a technophobe who would never have his finger on those pulses!

Rob

pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2017, 05:16:00 PM »

It could be from Holland...another pic has windmills. Thanks. :-)
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petermfiore

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Re: What film?
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2017, 05:19:19 PM »

It could be from Holland...another pic has windmills. Thanks. :-)

The 82nd was in holland  Sept of  44  for operation Market Garden...didn't go all that well. A Movie A BRIDGE TOO FAR is all about the operation...

Peter

pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2017, 05:21:46 PM »

Yeah, my dad was there. He had some amazing stories.  He was a pathfinder at DDay. Was in Sicily. 

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petermfiore

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Re: What film?
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2017, 05:31:55 PM »

My uncles were all thru Europe and Father spent almost four years island hopping in the South Pacific...very amazing stories!!


Peter

Telecaster

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Re: What film?
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2017, 12:24:24 AM »

35mm cameras weren't that common in the US 'til after WWII. But there were some, like the Argus A. I'd put my speculative money on an A being Sharon's dad's camera.

-Dave-
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Rand47

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Re: What film?
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2017, 12:58:02 AM »

I have some small contact prints my father took in England during WWII. Can anyone tell me what film this is from?

127 roll film?

http://www.obsoletemedia.org/127-film/

http://www.photographyhistory.com/cc6.html


Rand
« Last Edit: December 14, 2017, 01:04:55 AM by Rand47 »
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Rand Scott Adams

Tony Jay

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Re: What film?
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2017, 01:58:52 AM »

The 82nd was in holland  Sept of  44  for operation Market Garden...didn't go all that well. A Movie A BRIDGE TOO FAR is all about the operation...

Peter
The 82nd airborne performed brilliantly in that operation - did everything they were tasked to do.
The problem was at Arnhem and the tactical plan for the capture of the bridge over the lower Rhine which was the responsibility of the British 6th airborne division. The issue was that the plan called for landings 12-15 km away from the bridge. Doesn't sound very far but for an airborne operation at that time it may as well have been the distance to the moon.
Only a handful of British paratroops even got as far as Arnhem...

The outstanding tactical lesson for airborne operations in WW2 was that one needed to be dropped or land (they used gliders extensively) right on top of one's objective. That lesson was not heeded by the planners of the operation at Arnhem.
Interestingly enough the two American airborne divisions (the 82nd and 101st airborne) involved in operation Market Garden performed flawlessly and achieved all their objectives. Their tactical plans called for the drop zones and landing zones to be right next to their objectives. A less than subtle pattern emerges...

All airborne operations carried out in WW2, by any army, resulted in heavy casualties. However, by the end of the war, despite the casualties, the American airborne units had written, and rewritten, the book on airborne operations...Many of those operations are still taught as textbook operations in military academies around the world today!

Hero's to the last - every one of them!
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Rob C

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Re: What film?
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2017, 04:25:57 AM »

The 82nd airborne performed brilliantly in that operation - did everything they were tasked to do.
The problem was at Arnhem and the tactical plan for the capture of the bridge over the lower Rhine which was the responsibility of the British 6th airborne division. The issue was that the plan called for landings 12-15 km away from the bridge. Doesn't sound very far but for an airborne operation at that time it may as well have been the distance to the moon.
Only a handful of British paratroops even got as far as Arnhem...

The outstanding tactical lesson for airborne operations in WW2 was that one needed to be dropped or land (they used gliders extensively) right on top of one's objective. That lesson was not heeded by the planners of the operation at Arnhem.
Interestingly enough the two American airborne divisions (the 82nd and 101st airborne) involved in operation Market Garden performed flawlessly and achieved all their objectives. Their tactical plans called for the drop zones and landing zones to be right next to their objectives. A less than subtle pattern emerges...

All airborne operations carried out in WW2, by any army, resulted in heavy casualties. However, by the end of the war, despite the casualties, the American airborne units had written, and rewritten, the book on airborne operations...Many of those operations are still taught as textbook operations in military academies around the world today!

Hero's to the last - every one of them!

All this, and not a memntion of John Wayne or Errol Flynn? How unkind!

;-)

Rob

Mike D. B.

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Re: What film?
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2017, 04:28:31 AM »

My dad was 82nd Airborne.
Sharon, my father was also in the 82nd and jumped on D-day.

I have the division history book which follows each battle in detail, from training in the UK (before D-day) to the end of the war, when (units of) the 82nd was stationed in Berlin.  If you could find a more specific battalion your father was assigned to during preparations (in the UK) or during the D-day jump, I might be able to locate a region the the UK, where your father may have been located.

The book has a photo of my father on the banks of Loch Ness.  No, he didn't mention meerting the monster.  ;)

elliot_n

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Re: What film?
« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2017, 07:26:47 AM »

Isn't there some Google app that lets you feed in a picture and it returns similar ones?

You can do that with Google Images - just click on the camera icon in the search bar. I tried with Sharon's image, but Google gets confused by the tree branches. I also tried tighter crops of parts of the architecture, but no joy. It's a spectacular looking church, somewhat similar to the North Entrance of Westminster Abbey. Should be easily identifiable by someone who knows their churches.
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pearlstreet

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Re: What film?
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2017, 11:31:47 AM »

Sharon, my father was also in the 82nd and jumped on D-day.

I have the division history book which follows each battle in detail, from training in the UK (before D-day) to the end of the war, when (units of) the 82nd was stationed in Berlin.  If you could find a more specific battalion your father was assigned to during preparations (in the UK) or during the D-day jump, I might be able to locate a region the the UK, where your father may have been located.

The book has a photo of my father on the banks of Loch Ness.  No, he didn't mention meerting the monster.  ;)

Hi Mike. My dad's plane at Dday was pathfinder one. Its the one that Col. Frank Bagby of Eisenhowers staff stole a ride on. :-).  From what I remember, my dad was pulled out of his unit for an assignment from Eisenhower concerning a secret radio operation. So when he was in England, i don't think he was with his regular unit. My dad died in 1986- i wish he had lived when the internet came to be - he would have loved finding other vets.

My dad is standing on the far right in this photo.

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