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Author Topic: Calibrated Windows monitor, adjustment steps  (Read 3019 times)

Ethan Hansen

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Re: Calibrated Windows monitor, adjustment steps
« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2017, 06:12:43 PM »

One more thing -- in the DisplayCal documentation they say that "the precision of Windows' built-in calibration loading is inferior compared to the DisplayCAL profile loader and may introduce inaccuracies and artifacts." This might also be true of other calibration loaders, I suppose.

It may, although I never saw artifacts or could measure any differences in raw screen behavior with our photoradiometer when using DisplayCal vs. the built-in Windows calibration loader. DisplayCal profiles contain the Argyll-only 'arts' tag used to specify which absolute <> relative media white point transform should be used (Bradford or wrong Von Kries). If you use an ArgyllCMS-powered application to display your images on-screen, you'll see improved accuracy when viewing sRGB or Adobe RGB images. Adobe, etc. don't support this.

Apple's Make and Model tag ('mmod') also appears, but it is not used. All data are zeroed out. I don't see any other tags that could affect LUT loading behavior that are not supported by the Windows native API.

We used DisplayCal on the occasional system (server display screens, a handful of laptops) some years back. These systems were ones without DDC support for other calibration software. I tired of the Zero Install stuff running in the background and dumped the DisplayCal loader. That's when I checked for any differences between using Windows and DisplayCal to load the calibrations. If anyone out there has other experiences, please let me know.

Side note: I don't think we currently have any monitors calibrated with DisplayCal. We dumped older systems and i1P supports DDC on many mainstream panels, giving superior results to DisplayCal.
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walter.sk

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Been profiling OK for years; now confused
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2018, 08:48:51 PM »

I've got an old NEC LCD3090QXi, and have been profiling it with SpectraView II (currently v1.1.36) on a Windows 10 64 bit PC using the ColorMonkey for years now.  Somewhere along the way MS changed what happens when I go to Settings>Color Management.  On the Devices tab I removed all of the accumulated ICC profiles and clicked Add Profile.  After finding my latest profile again, I clicked to add it to the Color Management window.  I never in the past noticed a checkbox "Add As Advanced Profile," so I checked that.  I clicked to set that profile as Default.

On the Advanced tab, choices came up that I had not seen before.  Here are what I chose, but I don't have the slightest idea if I made the right choices, because I no longer understand what these settings now do in Windows:

1: Device Profile. I set it to the same, latest profile that I made.
2: Viewing Conditions Profile: I set it to WCS Profile For ICC Viewing conditions.
3: Since most of the time I find the Relative Colorimetric rendering intent more useful, I set it as the Default  Rendering Intent.
4:for Perceptual (PhotoImages) I set System Default (Photography).
5:for Relative Colorimetric (line art) I set Photography.
6:for Absolute Colorimetric I set System Default (Proofing - simulate paper color).
7:for Business Graphics I set System Default (Charts & Graphs).

I know what the various rendering intents are used for, and I am used to doing soft-proofing in PS and LightRoom, but don't have the slightest idea of how Windows uses these choice, nor what I should have selected.

Also, on boot-up I used to see the Spectraview app come up and load the profile into the monitor, with the progress bar displaying after the Spectraview window closed.  This does not happen anymore, and my boot process seems to have changed with some gray screens that come up before my desktop is visible; I don't know whether the gray screen is simply hiding the Spectraview routine, or if it is simply not running.

Am I using the right procedure to utilize my profiles?  And what on earth are they trying to doing at MS? Or is it me?





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GWGill

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Re: Calibrated Windows monitor, adjustment steps
« Reply #22 on: February 05, 2018, 05:27:39 AM »

DisplayCal profiles contain the Argyll-only 'arts' tag used to specify which absolute <> relative media white point transform should be used (Bradford or wrong Von Kries). If you use an ArgyllCMS-powered application to display your images on-screen, you'll see improved accuracy when viewing sRGB or Adobe RGB images. Adobe, etc. don't support this.
Generally it's the opposite way around: all CMMs get the benefits of using Bradford for Relative Colormetric, Perceptual and Saturation intents when using a default ArgyllCMS profile. The down side is that non 'arts' aware CMMs will have a slight inaccuracy for Absolute Colorimetric, the magnitude of which depends on how far from white the media color is.
(There are options for generating a strictly ICC compliant wrong-Von-Kries profile too.)
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Alan Goldhammer

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Re: Been profiling OK for years; now confused
« Reply #23 on: February 05, 2018, 08:09:36 AM »


Also, on boot-up I used to see the Spectraview app come up and load the profile into the monitor, with the progress bar displaying after the Spectraview window closed.  This does not happen anymore, and my boot process seems to have changed with some gray screens that come up before my desktop is visible; I don't know whether the gray screen is simply hiding the Spectraview routine, or if it is simply not running.

Am I using the right procedure to utilize my profiles?  And what on earth are they trying to doing at MS? Or is it me?
You should always be able to see the current profile a WinOS is using by going into the Control Panel and opening up Color Management.  This will tell you whether Spectraview is operating properly or not.  Sometimes Windows updates can cause problems with some programs and that might be what is happening here.  I had something flaky happening a couple of months ago when the Spectraview program icon suddenly disappeared from my desktop.  I deleted the current version of the program and reinstalled it and everything worked just fine.  In addition, you are running an older version of the program and probably should update.
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walter.sk

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Re: Been profiling OK for years; now confused
« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2018, 02:13:39 PM »

You should always be able to see the current profile a WinOS is using by going into the Control Panel and opening up Color Management...    In addition, you are running an older version of the program and probably should update.
I opened Color Management and my latest profile is listed as the default, so I guess it's working.  I checked for updates after opening Spectraview II and it said I had the latest version.  Thanks.
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