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Author Topic: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads  (Read 769 times)

Rob C

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Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« on: December 06, 2017, 05:50:57 AM »

On an earlier topic, ballheads, there was discussing of ways to prevent slippage of the camera when heavy lenses were being used.

I used to find the same problem on my very heavy Gitzo tripod, even with their own head product, as in the image. The solution turned out to be a small piece of perspex filed and rounded to fit the slot on the mounting plate. It rests against the back of the camera, when in place, and solves the rotational movement once and for all, at no cost.

(At last! An example of a brief appenticeship in enginering, prior to switching to photography, paying me a tiny, belated dividend.)

http://www.roma57.com/uploads/4/2/8/7/4287956/d-3197_1_orig.jpg

Rob
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 12:08:21 PM by Rob C »
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Conner999

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 08:16:29 AM »

Looks good. Often does take much and a little inner MacGyver can solve many an issue.
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NancyP

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2017, 10:32:55 AM »

Nice, especially for older, non-standard form, cameras.
I prefer L brackets, or at the minimum, pinned or ridged camera plates, with Arca style clamps.
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nma

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 10:57:41 AM »

I agree with Nancy P's comments. And I would add that the photos that Rob C attached to his post certainly illustrate the problem. It is not sufficient to assume the problem is solely due to the choice of ball head. This problem is best solved with custom-designed camera mounting plates and L-brackets.  Rob C's picture shows the "physics" of the problem: the camera can rotate around the mounting bolt. Simply adding an Arca Swiss clamp does not fully solve the problem. The camera, or clamp, or mount, must be prevented from rotating on the mounting bolt.  To succeed, all the plates and mounts must function as a single unit without vibration or mechanical movement.
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KLaban

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 11:53:17 AM »

I'd never be without an L bracket.
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MattBurt

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 12:10:54 PM »

I'm on a Manfrotto RC2 QR system and wish I had a good choice for a RC2 L plate for my K-1 but there is only one custom (RRS, I think) solution and it's Arca Swiss mount. I have nothing against that system but I don't really want to switch and feel RC2 serves my needs perfectly well. But I'd almost do it for that nice L plate designed specifically for this camera.
The plates I buy for my camera have a grippy surface where they touch the camera and as long as the bolt is reasonably tight they do not slip.
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-MattB

Two23

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 08:55:59 PM »

I'm on a Manfrotto RC2 QR system and wish I had a good choice for a RC2 L plate for my K-1 but there is only one custom (RRS, I think) solution and it's Arca Swiss mount. I have nothing against that system but I don't really want to switch and feel RC2 serves my needs perfectly well. But I'd almost do it for that nice L plate designed specifically for this camera.


I,ve gone to A/S tripod heads just so I could use "L" plates on my DSLR cameras.  I've been using dedicated L plates since the late 1990s.  I switched mainly to get away from the twisting problem, but now my main motivation is the easy switching from portrait to landscape orientation.


Kent in SD
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Peter McLennan

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2017, 11:09:29 PM »

Imagine how difficult this problem is with movie cameras. They can easily weigh fifty pounds and have the same problem. 
The solution? Dovetail plates.  Just like Arca Swiss and L-plates.
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MattBurt

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2017, 11:22:55 PM »


I,ve gone to A/S tripod heads just so I could use "L" plates on my DSLR cameras.  I've been using dedicated L plates since the late 1990s.  I switched mainly to get away from the twisting problem, but now my main motivation is the easy switching from portrait to landscape orientation.


Kent in SD

I really like that quick portrait/landscape option on my 645D which is why I want an L plate. I might try a universal one on the smaller gear before switching systems.
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-MattB

KLaban

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 03:50:40 AM »

Haven't used it for many years but I just couldn't countenance having to go back to using that damned tripod head slot.

RRS L Plates and Arca Swiss heads changed my life.

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Rob C

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2017, 07:50:11 AM »

Haven't used it for many years but I just couldn't countenance having to go back to using that damned tripod head slot.

RRS L Plates and Arca Swiss heads changed my life.


Call me nostalgic, but never had such problems on 6x6!

Rob

KLaban

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2017, 08:02:01 AM »


Call me nostalgic, but never had such problems on 6x6!

Rob

Hehe.

The lightbulb moment came to me when I switched from 6x6 film Hasselblads to 6x45 digital Hasselblad.
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Rob C

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2017, 08:13:43 AM »

Hehe.

The lightbulb moment came to me when I switched from 6x6 film Hasselblads to 6x45 digital Hasselblad.


I wonder, had 'blad come in with a square sensor, would you have ever moved downwards in image formats? That square offered so many options for final shape... but hey, only if you didn't crop too tightly in the camera, I must confess...

Funny thing: I'm sitting here in a bar having my second-class lunch, the French guy being closed until at least February, and the swamp pop rock in my ears is fitting perfectly the contortions of a young, technicolor group mouthing silently on the the tv screen.

:-)

Rob
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 08:17:33 AM by Rob C »
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Two23

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2017, 09:26:50 AM »

I'll mention you don't have to buy a whole new head.  On most heads you can simply change the base that holds the plate, and switch that to A/S compatible.


Kent in SD
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NancyP

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2017, 10:47:03 AM »

Dovetails are the much bigger original inspiration for Arca-Swiss design, and are standard in non-stationary (not permanently installed in observatory) telescopes.
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KLaban

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Re: Slipping/Rotating cameras on tripod heads
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2017, 11:45:37 AM »


I wonder, had 'blad come in with a square sensor, would you have ever moved downwards in image formats? That square offered so many options for final shape... but hey, only if you didn't crop too tightly in the camera, I must confess...

Funny thing: I'm sitting here in a bar having my second-class lunch, the French guy being closed until at least February, and the swamp pop rock in my ears is fitting perfectly the contortions of a young, technicolor group mouthing silently on the the tv screen.

:-)

Rob

The heft and girth were the deciding factor.
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