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Author Topic: Protected zones seriously threatened by mining expansion all over the world.  (Read 2818 times)

Farmer

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In my memory, it's never been so cold for the Adelaide test match (which is why I was there).  The water issues exist between Qld, NSW, Vic, and SA.  There's currently a review going on as I understand it.  It's mostly become more of an issue because of population growth, and the old arrangements no longer suit.
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Rob C

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In my memory, it's never been so cold for the Adelaide test match (which is why I was there).  The water issues exist between Qld, NSW, Vic, and SA.  There's currently a review going on as I understand it.  It's mostly become more of an issue because of population growth, and the old arrangements no longer suit.

Watched some news about the M. Macron in Africa. It was reported that the locals objected to suggestions that always occur about the population growth in Africa being ridiculously high, leading to starvation, wars and migration that affects everybody else... truth is great as long as it suits. Sadly enough, no need to think of Africa: think Europe for the same problem of over-breeding even if on a lower level. Some governments even increase social allowance payments the more kids people have; wasn't that a French thing at one time? Nice idea: make those with few or no kids pay for those with too many. Collects faithful votes! What constitutes too many? The number at which you can't afford to support them by your own efforts would be a nice place to start.

Still wondering why those barren, roasting desert countries are not turned into solar panel power souces. Yes, some already have a lot of that going on, but I believe that looked at, on an international scale, they could provide clean, alternative and exportable sources to international requirements without killing off the planet in the meantime. It would also provide work. If electric cars ever become the norm, gonna need it!

Wonder why anybody wants a driverless car? Always thought that the driving was a huge part of the buzz of ownership.

Rob

Robert Roaldi

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Population growth is not what it used to be: https://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_on_global_population_growth. See his other talks too.
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kers

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A  new dedicated satellite for airpollution Tromponi just has send its first data and what for me really stands out is bad quality of the air south of Brazils large city Manuas in the Amazone area.
As a result of the pollution and deforestation the rain forest is changing due to a change of climate / rainfall.

on the photo the CO content of the air ( carbon monoxide content) showing the areas of burning forests and processes of incomplete burning in general.
(source : http://www.tropomi.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/8.-TROP_CO_world.png  )
« Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 10:24:52 AM by kers »
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Rob C

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I think we're aleady going there in a handcart.

Too little too late by too few.

Rob

mediumcool

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I call "bullshit."

Kent in SD

You would.
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Schewe

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More bad news for those who love the landscape...

How Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke prompted a mass resignation from his National Park Service Advisory Board

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Few groups have been closer and more involved in Interior Department policy and management than the National Park System Advisory Board, an appointed and nonpartisan group established 83 years ago to consult on department operations and practices.

So it came as a shock this week when nine of the board's 12 members abruptly resigned in protest, complaining that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke had disregarded their requests to meet at least once, a circumstance no other Park System Advisory Board had encountered.

"We were deeply disappointed with the department's actions in dealing with us," said former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles, a Democrat who served as the board's chairman. "Advisory board advice can be accepted or ignored. The fact they suspended the board and there were no meetings on issues of climate and science, no meetings on finding ways to help underrepresented groups visit the parks. Those were the programs we'd spent years working on with previous secretaries. Those were the programs we wanted to discuss with the new secretary and keep the momentum going."

And this is the guy uncharge of America's "interior"...
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Schewe

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And the hits keep coming...

A Trojan Horse Threatens the Nationís Parks

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Members of Utahís congressional caucus, not content with eviscerating two national monuments in the state, have unleashed a new assault on public lands, proposing legislation that hides an agenda of deregulation behind the shield of the National Park Service and the beloved park system it oversees.

On Dec. 6, two days after President Trump radically reduced the size of the Grand Staircase Escalante and Bears Ears National Monuments by some two million acres, the largest reversion of federal land protections in the nationís history, Representative Chris Stewart, Republican of Utah, introduced legislation to establish the Escalante Canyons National Park and Preserve.

On its face, the bill might seem like something for advocates of preserving iconic Western landscapes to embrace in the face of Mr. Trumpís rollback. The new park would incorporate a small portion of the original 1.9-million-acre Grand Staircase area that the presidentís proclamation fractured. The other three members of the stateís House delegation, all Republicans, signed on as co-sponsors.

But a reading of the bill, H.R. 4558, reveals it as a Trojan horse, appearing as a gift to the public while eroding federal environmental protections on public lands. If it becomes law, the bill could set a precedent with enormous consequences nationally, all of them bad for the national parks and the park service, which celebrates its 102nd birthday this August. It is, in fact, a model for the piecemeal unraveling of the more than 400national parks, monuments, battlefields, historic sites, recreation areas and other places in the park system.

Hopefully the current litigation surrounding Trump's attempts at undoing the National Monument status of large tracks of land in Utah will be successful and this kind of backwards attempts at gaining control of public lands for corporate exploitation will be reversed...
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