Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Paying homage to the legendary 1Ds Mark III that gave me a crash course in DSLR  (Read 2406 times)

traderjay

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 81

In one of my earlier jobs 2007-2008, I had access to virtually every camera and lenses in the market - literally a kid in a candy store with unlimited all you can eat. My only photography experience before that was the Sony DSC-P series DSC-V1 P&S Camera so DSLR is completely new to me.

The big white Canon L lenses and the bulky 1Ds body grabbed my attention so I took them out of the inventory for a spin. The first thing I wondered is where are all the presets found on beginner friendly camera (sports, landscape etc). Then I realized I am dealing with a different beast altogether and I better ramp up my skills quickly. A week later, it was my wife's university convocation so I better learn how to shoot properly or else I am just going to be a poser with no substance.

Thinking about this, the lack of any auto-presets really threw me into the deep end and forced me to very quickly learn and memorize the photographer's trinity cold. To this day, I credit the 1Ds Mark III for really giving me a kick in the butt on what real photography is all about. I've attached some of the photos that was taken in my first week of using the 1Ds:







« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 10:08:56 AM by traderjay »
Logged

francois

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9340

The 1Ds Mark 3 lacks the bells and whistles of the newer DLSRs but it is a real workhorse.
Logged
Francois

traderjay

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 81

The 1Ds Mark 3 lacks the bells and whistles of the newer DLSRs but it is a real workhorse.
But back in 2008 (when those pics were taken), the 1Ds is a real force to be reckoned with.
Logged

francois

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9340

But back in 2008 (when those pics were taken), the 1Ds is a real force to be reckoned with.

I still have and use mine.
Logged
Francois

douglas frost

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21

I still have my 1DSmk3, although it generally just sits in may bag as a back-up body to my 1DX. Sadly, itís soon for ebay as I have slowly been switching fully to Sony for the last year.

I actually pulled it out a few weeks ago and used it alongside the 1DX shooting a musical rehearsal and I have to say, it was really annoying to use in comparison to the newer camera. Iím sure in a less demanding situation such as landscape or studio, it would be much less of an issue.

When I started shooting 40 years ago, it was with a Pentax K1000 - I guess like so many of us, Iíve become spoilt (and lazy...) with technology.

BUT, the files from the 1DSmk3 are still beautiful!
Logged

ski542002

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21

Took ownrship of my new DSIII with the 24-105 shortly after the body entered the market (2008?). Iís never failed me after almost 10 years of consistent use.  During that time, I had 4 years of painful ownership of Leica gear and now the A7RIII & 6500. As much as I appreciate and enjoy the perceived benefits of the Sony system, Iím reluctant to get rid of the DSIII.  It just doesnít quit and the image quality can hold itís own even today.
Logged

tcphoto1

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 74
    • http://www.tonyclarkphoto.com

The 1Ds3 was my main body for years but has been the backup after buying a 1Dx. It's amazing how it shows it's age when shooting above ISO400. I too will be selling it this year when I find a clean 1Dx2.
Logged

Balafre

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15

What a towering icon! The problem was less with the camera, but lay mainly with most of Canon's L series lenses. They simply didn't resolve detail or tone adequately to optimise the capability of the sensor. Some of their best lenses would artifact at 100% but when hooked up to decent German glass, Zeiss & Schneider, the same subject at similar magnification resolved 200% more.
The other advantage is we've got better RAW processors now, and it's surprising how much more one can squeeze out of an image now that was previously lost from view.
I'm only interested in the primacy of the still image. That's my thing.
For certain jobs, filling the frame under big lights at 100 ISO with decent German glass, its shots approximated MF, and actually befuddled some leading art directors in a couple top agencies.
Still does it too.
Yes the ISO over 200 was rubbish, and while I loved my Blads and love my Phase, I'm never relinquishing my Mk3's.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up