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Author Topic: Monochrome camera vs converting from color?  (Read 15399 times)

Telecaster

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Re: Monochrome camera vs converting from color?
« Reply #160 on: January 06, 2018, 03:36:46 PM »

In my recent experience resolution gains with the Monochrom (CCD sensor version) are minor compared to its Bayer'd counterpart. But my interest in the camera had nothing to do with that. I was looking at tonal differences. Even there I found I can get close enough with my M9 that I no longer have much interest in the mono version. The Monochrom does deliver a look, though, in the way different films do. If you like that look it's one less thing to fuss over. And you can do things like use a deep red filter to clarify a hazy sky without effectively blacking out a chunk of your photosites.

-Dave-
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GrahamBy

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Re: Monochrome camera vs converting from color?
« Reply #161 on: January 06, 2018, 04:39:28 PM »

"100% better"

Any comments from experts on that one? Sounds like an exaggeration to me.

Reminds me of a seminar on some bioinformatic method where at the end the speaker put up a two-column bar-chart. The columns were "my method" and "your method" and the vertical scale was "goodness"....

He at least knew he was taking the piss.
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patjoja

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Re: Monochrome camera vs converting from color?
« Reply #162 on: January 06, 2018, 05:57:58 PM »

In my recent experience resolution gains with the Monochrom (CCD sensor version) are minor compared to its Bayer'd counterpart. But my interest in the camera had nothing to do with that. I was looking at tonal differences. Even there I found I can get close enough with my M9 that I no longer have much interest in the mono version. The Monochrom does deliver a look, though, in the way different films do. If you like that look it's one less thing to fuss over. And you can do things like use a deep red filter to clarify a hazy sky without effectively blacking out a chunk of your photosites.

-Dave-

Regarding the tonality issue, in Gregory Simpson's article about the Monochrom ("Fetishes" part 2), he shows that he was able to get nearly equivalent tonality between a Lightroom adjusted M9 and the Monochrom.  So, it sounds like you've had a similar experience.

Personally, I enjoy the post processing part of photography, so shooting in color and converting makes sense for me, and I think I'm fairly convinced at present there is not much reason to invest in shooting in monochrome...other than perhaps for the fun of it.  Nothing wrong with that.

Patrick

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xpatUSA

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Re: Monochrome camera vs converting from color?
« Reply #163 on: January 12, 2018, 05:47:55 PM »

Some here might be able to have it all ways for under a grand (USD), if they are up to the challenge.

Buy a Sigma SD1 Merrill DSLR and, say, a Sigma 17-50mm constant f/2.8 zoom.

Point here being that the camera comes with an easily removable/replaceable (with a thumbnail) UV/IR blocking filter.

In place: you get color with no color-aliasing.

Removed: you ger full spectrum (panchromatic?) sensitivity on each layer of the Foveon sensor. Usually the top layer is best but the Sigma proprietary converter has a 3-channel raw data mixer to let you play with that. And the world becomes your oyster as to lens-mounted optical filters. The Hoya 720nm, for example, is popular for shooting NIR. Or I can plunk a Schott BG38 on the lens and capture a wider range of wavelengths than possible with the removable sharp-cutoff dichroic filter.

No need for anyone to tell me how bad or slow Sigma cameras are; I've been shooting them in good light for 10+ years.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 05:56:25 PM by xpatUSA »
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best regards,

Ted
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