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Author Topic: Moderators  (Read 4640 times)

Rob C

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Moderators
« on: November 03, 2017, 10:03:59 AM »

Just noticed a cause for doubt or at least, confusion: are the two gentlemen now running the entire Café or simply the revived/exhausted headbanger, weather thread, i.e. Climactic Climatic Delights to Come?

Rob

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 10:45:07 AM »

I assume (and fervently hope) that it's just the revived/exhausted headbanger, weather thread, i.e. Climactic Climatic Delights to Come.

Since that new thread has had nothing new or informative and little that is entertaining, I have stopped looking at it at all.

-Eric
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Chris Sanderson

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2017, 11:15:50 AM »

Just noticed a cause for doubt or at least, confusion: are the two gentlemen now running the entire Café or simply the revived/exhausted headbanger, weather thread, i.e. Climactic Climatic Delights to Come?

Rob
The forum software only allows for Moderators of sections/forums (ie Coffee Corner) not of individual topics (Climate Change).

However the Moderator's purview was understood to be for the Climate Change topic.

Moderation overall remains with Kevin Raber, Debra Fadely-Raber and myself, irrespective of any additional Moderators. Clear as mud right?
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The Luminous-Landscape

Alan Goldhammer

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2017, 12:32:15 PM »

I am only moderating the climate change thread.

Alan
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Rob C

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2017, 01:27:01 PM »

Thanks, guys, I understand it now.

Rob

FranciscoDisilvestro

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2017, 03:58:00 PM »

I find it a little bit odd, especially when a moderator has a strong bias towars one side of the argument. It is a case where the same individual is judge and plantiff.

pegelli

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2017, 04:18:32 PM »

The two moderators are on opposite sides of the spectrum, so I think it's nicely balanced and have no problem with it. So far the thread is going quite well.
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Rob C

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2017, 04:25:46 PM »

I find it a little bit odd, especially when a moderator has a strong bias towars one side of the argument. It is a case where the same individual is judge and plantiff.

It's known as the beautiful game; the real one.

;-)

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2017, 04:41:47 PM »

I assume (and fervently hope) that it's just the revived/exhausted headbanger, weather thread, i.e. Climactic Climatic Delights to Come.

Since that new thread has had nothing new or informative and little that is entertaining, I have stopped looking at it at all.

-Eric


It's a shame it's taken itself so seriously; even photography has reached a point where taking it seriously brings no spiritual reward and at best, fills in time before the lights go out.

On balance, photography is at least partly under one's own control, but the weather is at the mercy of madmen and money men. What hope a little scribbler on LuLa to change anything by one iota. Which reminds me, I have no idea what an iota looks like, but I know what she has been made to represent - and that ain't much.

Sitting here beside my alter ego, the slob on the couch, I was inspired to check out the old Mintex calendars online. To my surprise, all I could come up with was a bundle of snaps of racing circuit girls looking oh so cheap and nasty in colourful, skin-hugging pants and tops. How unfortunate that the cleverly photographed calendars of yesteryear seem to have disappeared, to be replaced by real life.

Everywhere I look I seem to see a rapid sinking of past excellences; how I hope it's just in my mind.

;-(

Rob

Telecaster

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2017, 06:27:34 PM »

It's a shame it's taken itself so seriously…

IMO most of what ails humanity is a result of taking things (especially oneself) so seriously.  ;)

Here’s a recent Hubble photo of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 665 (named after the guy who identified it):



Everything in the photo without diffraction spikes is a galaxy. Each galaxy—there are 300+ in this particular cluster—is so large that it takes light from 50,000 to 200,000 of our years to traverse the galaxy’s diameter. All of this happens in total ignorance of and indifference to our existence, our self-absorption, our delusion and our folly. The observable universe is chock-a-block with such clusters. It pleases me greatly that they just keep on doing their thing, out of our reach.

-Dave-
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degrub

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2017, 07:49:14 PM »

...then again, they might not even exist today, eh ?
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Telecaster

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2017, 09:09:17 PM »

...then again, they might not even exist today, eh ?

Oooh, a can o’ worms.  :)  Is there a universal “today?” General relativity says no, but the phenomenon of quantum entanglement suggests maybe.

If we could travel to Abell 665 instantaneously it’d look different to the above photo. How much different? Who knows… Contemplating Deep Time: one of my fav thought activities.

-Dave-
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Rob C

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2017, 06:04:36 AM »

Oooh, a can o’ worms.  :)  Is there a universal “today?” General relativity says no, but the phenomenon of quantum entanglement suggests maybe.

If we could travel to Abell 665 instantaneously it’d look different to the above photo. How much different? Who knows… Contemplating Deep Time: one of my fav thought activities.

-Dave-

Ah! that explains it: I can't do that, so I now understand my lack of musical ability. But why can't I whistle? Well I can, to an extent that involves no tune, and as I have recently abandoned driving off to buy bread and just walk to the shop instead, I have to pass several fields, a boat-wintering yard in the middle of nowhere and a sewage processing station. Yet, I always manage to avoid cyclists, head down, shouting in German (I think) as they rush into the first big roundabout outside town, graced with the sculpture of a fire-fighting aircraft (the roundabout, that is). The field before this artistic delight (great for distracting speeding drivers!) sometimes contains an old white horse I have been told is called Moira. Perhaps Moira is also an immigrant. Maybe the cyclists are really shouting at the sensory charms of the sewage station, when a wiser course would be to refrain from breathing for a few seconds rather than gulping air. But then, adult cyclists and reason...

Anyway, as I now do this trip (about 25mins) by foot, I have taken to buying carrots as well as bread, and Moira, I discovered, may be old but very far from deaf. She often loiters near a trough at the far end of the field - possibly to avoid toxic exhaust fumes from cars or cyclists - but I realised that she responds well to a repeated, if muted, psst! psst! sort of whistle. The first time, she raised her head and turned around, glanced my way over her rump and, when I waved the plastic bag, she kinda reversed and then walked slowly across the field towards me. Over the weeks we have become close friends - as long as I have a carrot or two. Now, I walk with a conscience and a challenge: converse with an old white horse or walk quietly back with my thoughts into the setting, winter Sun.

Rob

Update: this evening Moira trotted over for her carrots!
« Last Edit: November 04, 2017, 04:47:51 PM by Rob C »
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Telecaster

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2017, 07:30:05 PM »

Rob, you make an engaging memoirist!  :)

-Dave-
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2017, 11:54:23 PM »

Rob, you make an engaging memoirist!  :)

-Dave-
+1.
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Rob C

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2017, 05:21:22 AM »

Well, the realistic alternative to scribbles is the making of snaps. I think I've snapped pretty much all that's around me (that is obvious enough for me to see) and so the alternative lies in the recounting - largely to myself and for my own benefit - of my mundane, daily tasks.

Thing is, life here has become fairly routine (thank God!) and excitement as much a threat as a need; events that might have once seemed positive now look very much more like menace to stability and calm. Progress, as she is called, always comes at a huge price: the place where I dine most days was always a bit dodgy regarding parking as the nearest was a sort of unofficial lay-by under some plane trees which, in the frequent windy spells most islands enjoy, provided both shelter and threat from falling branches. I used to try and time my arrival to fit between local people vacating those few spaces after work, and my own needs as dictated by the restaurant's working hours.

A couple of years ago, in its wisdom, the local council took over a field behind the planes and shaved it of its vegetation, thus creating an uneven, jutting small rocks obstacle course for cars. In daylight this can be navigated, but as I never go there at night, I don't know how much damage has been done. Maybe somebody on the council also owns garages. The zone has also become a sort of cemetery for old cars, which isn't all bad: I know which is which, and so parking beside one offers protection on at least one side. Anyway, this has helped me to park at lunchtime, but it has also been a magnet for tourists trying to visit Pollensa. Unfortunately, they dump hired cars and leave them there all day as they explore. (Did I mention that it's free?) Scientifically, it's something to do with nature abhorring vacuums. However, nature also has a sympathetic card up her sleeve: if it rains, those tourist discover they are trapped, as the place turns into a bog. The downside, of course, is that off-season dining has become difficult because I don't use that new "facility" in bad weather because I obviously know what it entails. But on the bright side, the restaurant closes for a couple of the coldest, wettest months, and so I do for myself at home because many of the lesser local alternatives close for winter, too. On reconsideration, maybe that isn't a bright side.

(To explain: local means the port of Pollensa, some six or so klicks from Pollensa, the old town that I really enjoy. I should be able to tell the actual number of klicks because I often check the trip meter at the start of the drive, but never when I arrive. Back in '66 the port was the magnet: beautiful little place; today it resembles every other concreted and pedestrianised little coastal town on the Med, not that I've seen them all, of course. Consequently, I mainly go there to visit the bank and the post office, and for the obligatory hour's walk that takes in Moira the horse, and the yacht club's moorings. You have to live in a tourist town that itself lives off sea and sunshine to see what a desert it becomes in winter, with the beach blowing back up across the promenades - just like in a spaghetti western, the gales in the distant rigging making a cheap copy of Ennio Morricone's soundtracks. (Morricone must have been a difficult name for a European child to grow up bearing.))

Rob

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2017, 12:03:33 PM »

My son told me a few days ago that the number of atoms in the Universe is 10 followed by 72 zeros.

Telecaster

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2017, 01:49:33 PM »

My son told me a few days ago that the number of atoms in the Universe is 10 followed by 72 zeros.

It’s an estimate of the observable universe (which likely isn’t the whole thing) based on the number of atoms in one gram of hydrogen: 6 x 10-to-the-23. It assumes our sun is an average star and that the Milky Way is an average galaxy. The number I’m familiar with is 2.4 x 10-to-the-78. Note that everything other than hydrogen in a star is ignored as collectively it doesn’t even rate a decimal place.  :)

-Dave-
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2017, 01:55:42 PM »

Thanks!

You sometimes put things in perspective!

Best regards
Erik

IMO most of what ails humanity is a result of taking things (especially oneself) so seriously.  ;)

Here’s a recent Hubble photo of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 665 (named after the guy who identified it):



Everything in the photo without diffraction spikes is a galaxy. Each galaxy—there are 300+ in this particular cluster—is so large that it takes light from 50,000 to 200,000 of our years to traverse the galaxy’s diameter. All of this happens in total ignorance of and indifference to our existence, our self-absorption, our delusion and our folly. The observable universe is chock-a-block with such clusters. It pleases me greatly that they just keep on doing their thing, out of our reach.

-Dave-
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imagetone

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Re: Moderators
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2017, 03:12:17 AM »

Rob

You’re making me want to go back there again. When I was last there in June with my wife for our wedding anniversary we walked past the boatyard I think you might be referring to when we walked over to Cala San Vicente. A walk with beauty in its most natural and its most mundane urban forms.

Prior to that I was there in late March after an absence of a few years. Yes as a cyclist in a small group speaking English, head up as much as down, appreciating the beauty. The wild flowers around Sta. Margalida (and plenty of other roads) are unforgettable as is the quiet of ascending slowly into the mountains from Pollensa first amongst the pines then the tinkling of sheep/goat bells.

First saw it and fell in love with it in the mid eighties before the motorway reached north. Would love to have seen it in the early sixties when it was still a glamorous destination for the jet set and calendar shoots.

The marine aeroplane sculpture (and bypass) was new to me and I like it but then I always liked seeing the real thing come over the bay whilst we eat breakfast.

Enjoy your walk.

Tony



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