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Author Topic: More on Sieff  (Read 2444 times)

KLaban

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2017, 08:39:45 AM »

The thing I noticed about Raffles, apart from the crazy drinks pricing - but hey, when you're pouring out a myth - was that it had all the appearance of a large, Indian railway station inside.

I'm led to believe that it was later closed and entirely refurbished...

Another thing that appealed to me very much about Singapore was the ban on gum - clean pavements! - and the fact that tipping was actively discouraged by notices on the café and bar tables. I have never felt comfortable with tips, either giving too little or too much - whatever either is. I feel it is demeaning of the staff, who should all be paid according to the value of their work, not made to feel like a sort of chartity-dependent soul. Your meal is going to cost you a certain amount anyway, either in two parts or as a single charge - so why not have the tip included as part of the total price and not left as a little thorn under the tab?

Rob

I don't like tipping for poor service.
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2017, 09:24:57 AM »

I don't like tipping for poor service.

I agree, but standing up to it takes a toll: we were in a Holiday Inn in Miami - quite a large one, and well-appointed, and we had breakfast there as a shooting team. "Our" waitress was, I'm sure, stoned out of her skull, and the service quite dreadful and slow. We were there to work, not laze about, and so we got rather agitated as time slipped past... anyhow, at the end, we decided to leave nothing. However, that wasn't going to suit the woman who kicked up hell, which in my view, should have had her fired on the spot for embarrassing a client getting poor service.

Buy yeah, unusual people make unusual decisions.

Thing is though, were tip included in the price and the waiters paid a proper wage, then it would be in all their interests to give good service and product, for otherwise return visits could not be hoped for...

KLaban

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2017, 10:04:26 AM »

I'd say having the tip included in the price is a disincentive for waiters to provide good service...
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Telecaster

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2017, 03:32:36 PM »

The thing I noticed about Raffles, apart from the crazy drinks pricing - but hey, when you're pouring out a myth - was that it had all the appearance of a large, Indian railway station inside.

I'm led to believe that it was later closed and entirely refurbished...

Another thing that appealed to me very much about Singapore was the ban on gum - clean pavements! - and the fact that tipping was actively discouraged by notices on the café and bar tables. I have never felt comfortable with tips, either giving too little or too much - whatever either is. I feel it is demeaning of the staff, who should all be paid according to the value of their work, not made to feel like a sort of chartity-dependent soul. Your meal is going to cost you a certain amount anyway, either in two parts or as a single charge - so why not have the tip included as part of the total price and not left as a little thorn under the tab?

My stay at the Raffles was post-refurbishing, which supposedly restored the look of the place to its original state. It was elegant but not overly ornate. The bar had a subdued, warm appearance and vibe. The Slings were, as my mom would’ve said had she ever stopped in, very dear:D

I agree re. tipping, and am always happy when I find a restaurant that discourages it while including a service surcharge.

The thing that most impressed me about Singapore during my first trip was how well maintained the place is. Clean sidewalks, good roads, etc. It seemed clear to me that Singaporeans genuinely care about such stuff. Here in the US people are often willing to put up with poorly maintained infrastructure for the sake of saving a few $$ in the short term, even if the long-term costs (social as well as economic) are higher. IMO this reflects a crass, coarse view of the world.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2017, 03:34:18 PM »

I'd say having the tip included in the price is a disincentive for waiters to provide good service...

This has not been my experience. At all.

-Dave-
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2017, 04:24:07 PM »

My stay at the Raffles was post-refurbishing, which supposedly restored the look of the place to its original state. It was elegant but not overly ornate. The bar had a subdued, warm appearance and vibe. The Slings were, as my mom would’ve said had she ever stopped in, very dear:D

I agree re. tipping, and am always happy when I find a restaurant that discourages it while including a service surcharge.

The thing that most impressed me about Singapore during my first trip was how well maintained the place is. Clean sidewalks, good roads, etc. It seemed clear to me that Singaporeans genuinely care about such stuff. Here in the US people are often willing to put up with poorly maintained infrastructure for the sake of saving a few $$ in the short term, even if the long-term costs (social as well as economic) are higher. IMO this reflects a crass, coarse view of the world.

-Dave-


A thing that always impressed me was changing from the French motorways to the poor English ones on the way from Dover to Scotland. I'd rather pay the French toll charges and have great surfaces and rest facilities! And French versions of motorway services' food than free roads that make your car suffer and you tired exhausted. To be fair, I think the Brit motorways are older than the French ones, so perhaps time will bring a dumbing down of the better ones; usually does.

Again, the psychology of free being better than paid for, regardless of anything else. Also again, this is getting too cloose to politics so I'd better watch my step! (I could always blame the glaucoma I had for four years and then discovered I apparently never had, and the twin cataracts I'm now assured that I do. Maybe a slow shutter speed will make them look cool; sorry!)

Had a new estate agent look my place over today - I hope he has a better wad of luck to spread my way. I really could do with getting back into a metropolis of some sort. I feel I'm turning into a country lad with straw hanging out of his ears. It can't be me! I'm being inhabited by somebody else!

Rob
« Last Edit: October 27, 2017, 04:27:20 PM by Rob C »
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GrahamBy

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2017, 04:38:24 PM »

And yet you don't get to choose how much to leave for your new lens, you pay the price and if it turns out to be defective you complain. Having a pre-negotiated fee for servicing your car, being treated by your dictor or dentist may be a disincentive to them giving good service, but somehow it works out. It has the advantage that they don't need to work two jobs to stay above the poverty line, which may even help with the service.
Frankly, tipping is a left over of feudalism.
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2017, 07:06:12 AM »

Graham -

Picked up my new Lindbergh tome from the GPO this morning, and put it straight onto the Sumo stand. I have yet to get through it, but one thing hits me right away: matt papers still do nothing for photographs. His work is usually fairly dark, and on such paper it goes extremely dull, killing many of the images right away. Fashion mags do reproduction of this genre of work far better; not called glossies for nothing!

Another aspect that has a strong bearing on this is the fact of monitors and iPad-type screens that make things come to an inner life. Seeing less is a disappointment - to me, at least - because it shows me what is being missed in books. But I love books... maybe the future will consist of bigger and better, cheaper iPad things that allow one to cuddle up and vegetate with great, virtual world picture books. Picture books; sound a bit infantile, dunnit?

;-)

Rob

P.S.

Well, I've seen all the shots now, and I understand better why I find the "making of" videos more interesting to watch. The cameramen he uses are very good in their own right, and do a great job of adding interest, which is not surprising as we get to see the models do their thing rather than just catch PL's idea of the decisive moment. Unfortunately, this new child has created havoc with my very limited shelf space; I may have to depose Annie L to another room....
« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 02:37:36 PM by Rob C »
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Telecaster

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2017, 02:59:10 PM »

Frankly, tipping is a left over of feudalism.

Thus it’s continued ubiquity in the US, where feudalism is seen by a significant sub-culture to be a desirable state of affairs.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2017, 03:10:12 PM »

Another aspect that has a strong bearing on this is the fact of monitors and iPad-type screens that make things come to an inner life.

I have to admit that I love looking at photos on my TV. I’ve set up a Photo profile on it just for this. Haven’t fired up the printer since early this year. IMO Leiter’s color work in particular is made for such display.

-Dave-
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2017, 05:01:57 PM »

I admit that it's late and past my second-childhood bedtime, but immersed as I have been in the new book most of this evening, it suddenly struck me that I can't discover a page that lists ISBN number, nor even publishing date. I thought books were obliged to carry such information by law...

As I remarked, it is late and I've taken my medicine.

Puzzled, of Mallorca

Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2017, 05:08:00 PM »

I have to admit that I love looking at photos on my TV. I’ve set up a Photo profile on it just for this. Haven’t fired up the printer since early this year. IMO Leiter’s color work in particular is made for such display.

-Dave-

That's interesting; I have sometimes tried looking at my own website on the tv set - Samsung smart one - and quickly retreated: the pictures look awful, yet on this little iPad they look better even than on the monitor where I make them look as they look.

I always said that I have a complex about things electronic. We don't make a happy couple.

Rob

GrahamBy

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #32 on: October 30, 2017, 06:55:54 AM »

Picked up my new Lindbergh tome from the GPO this morning, and put it straight onto the Sumo stand. I have yet to get through it, but one thing hits me right away: matt papers still do nothing for photographs. His work is usually fairly dark, and on such paper it goes extremely dull, killing many of the images right away. Fashion mags do reproduction of this genre of work far better; not called glossies for nothing!

Yep, it all feels a bit Berlin-in-Winter. Looking wih a reasonably strong Ikea LED desk light helped. There is also fairly significant bronzing if you tilt 30° or more, but somehow I rather like that. Strange.

On the general subject of books, Art Books in town had a slightly used copy of Mary Ellen Mark's "Exposer" for <20€. All a bit depressing, I have to say. The attached phone-pic of her shot of the child of the monkey-tamer of an Indian circus being comforted by the monkeys is somehow both sad and touching... doomed innocence times three.
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #33 on: October 30, 2017, 08:16:49 AM »

Yep, it all feels a bit Berlin-in-Winter. Looking wih a reasonably strong Ikea LED desk light helped. There is also fairly significant bronzing if you tilt 30° or more, but somehow I rather like that. Strange.

On the general subject of books, Art Books in town had a slightly used copy of Mary Ellen Mark's "Exposer" for <20€. All a bit depressing, I have to say. The attached phone-pic of her shot of the child of the monkey-tamer of an Indian circus being comforted by the monkeys is somehow both sad and touching... doomed innocence times three.


God yes, That is a gloomy photograph. Every now and again something comes along to remind me of my good fortune in being, well, just me. Not the richest and not the most poor, but led a marvellous life regardless. And as good, I retain a faith in a hereafter and perhaps getting my late wife back - for ever.

(Ikea wouldn't help much in that quest!)

:-)

Such is humanity.

Rob
 

Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2017, 03:51:18 PM »

I think that having now digested the PL tome, I am bound to conclude that it's well worth it's reasonable cost, but as has now happened to me with Sumo, it's not going to get anywhere near the handling that my Leiter books are getting. Perhaps it's to do with the fashion books feeling quite oppressive in their own way - an unrelenting Teutonic insistence on a very determined point of view, let's say, or could it just be that Leiter comes across as a gentle soul with deep feelings and an appreciation of classical notions of harmony?

I don't have a glib answer as to why; I just find it so, and am left just a little bit disappointed overall, especially as I enjoy the PL making-of videos so much... If there is an indication within the mystery, perhaps it's that I find quite a few of the Lindbergh women not at all attractive. The ones that feature in the later videos, away from the 80's era, light a glow that many earlier ones cannot, but they really are a mixed bag in my opinion, even some of the later ones. Or is it just the harsh treatment?
« Last Edit: October 31, 2017, 06:00:56 PM by Rob C »
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KLaban

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2017, 05:38:42 PM »

I think that having now digested the PL tome, I am bound to conclude that it's well worth it's reasonable cost, but as has now happened to me with Sumo, it's not going to get anywhere near the handling that my Leiter books are getting. Perhaps it's to do with the fashion books feeling quite oppressive in their own way - an unrelenting Teutonic insistence on a very determined point of view, let's say, or could it just be that Leiter comes across as a gentle soul with deep feelings and an appreciation of classical notions of harmony?

I don't have a glib answer as to why; I just find it so, and am left just a little bit disappointed overall, especially as I enjoy the PL making-off videos so much... If there is an indication within the mystery, perhaps it's that I find quite a few of the Lindbergh women not at all attractive. The ones that feature in the later videos, away from the 80's era, light a glow that many earlier ones cannot, but they really are a mixed bag in my opinion, even some of the later ones. Or is it just the harsh treatment?

Rob, perhaps Leiter's books are more likely to inspire you to get it out and keep it out?

;-)
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2017, 05:59:19 PM »

Rob, perhaps Leiter's books are more likely to inspire you to get it out and keep it out?

;-)


Keith! This is a family programme!

It's also the start of what already feels like a very cold winter coming on, even if I do doze off in front of the tv. Or is that why I doze off?

;-)

P.S.

Making-off videos? What am I thinking?

KLaban

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2017, 04:05:49 AM »


Keith! This is a family programme!

It's also the start of what already feels like a very cold winter coming on, even if I do doze off in front of the tv. Or is that why I doze off?

;-)

P.S.

Making-off videos? What am I thinking?

Rob, I was talking cameras, you know?

;-)
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 04:10:08 AM by KLaban »
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Rob C

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Re: More on Sieff
« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2017, 07:05:54 AM »

Rob, I was talking cameras, you know?

;-)


Oh, that's all right then, Keith!

For a terrible moment I'd imagined you were talking zoom lenses, and as I indicated, this is a family show: should spouses ever discover what those bits of glass cost, the divorce rates would zoom too! You wouldn't want to feel guilty about that, I'm sure, any more than would I!

Pwhew!

Rob
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