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Author Topic: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction  (Read 428 times)

Thenolands

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Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« on: September 06, 2017, 06:46:38 PM »

I am reproducing some oil paintings for a family member and need advice on if I should be using a luster coated canvas or matte. They will be gallery wrapped or stretched. I did a test print on some matte canvas samples I have and didn't like how dull they came out so I would prefer to use a coated canvas. Is this a bad idea? Is the icc profile for the matte canvas I used just not very good? It was red river matte canvas which I know is not top of the line but it was so dull that I am thinking a big part of the issue is simply the matte surface. I test printed the image on luster paper and it looked awesome. Thoughts?
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artfoto

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2017, 08:11:53 PM »

In our place we have settled on Epson Exhibition Matte Canvas. All matte canvas needs to be coated so we use Clear Shield semi glass and our customers really seem to like this combination as much as we do.

 Neil
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Thenolands

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2017, 08:38:00 PM »

Thanks, Neil.

So from your perspective what is the benefit of going matte and then adding a luster coating (other than the protective benefits)? Every print I have seen it seems coated papers pop more and I don't think you get the same with a coating over the top. There must be some significant downside to luster canvas as it seems most people use matte.
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Garnick

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2017, 09:16:54 PM »

I am reproducing some oil paintings for a family member and need advice on if I should be using a luster coated canvas or matte. They will be gallery wrapped or stretched. I did a test print on some matte canvas samples I have and didn't like how dull they came out so I would prefer to use a coated canvas. Is this a bad idea? Is the icc profile for the matte canvas I used just not very good? It was red river matte canvas which I know is not top of the line but it was so dull that I am thinking a big part of the issue is simply the matte surface. I test printed the image on luster paper and it looked awesome. Thoughts?

I've been printing on Matte Canvas since 2004 and have never had a problem with the image being too dull once the final coating has been applied.  I test on Enhanced Matte paper, which is more cost effective than canvas.  Once I have the look I want I add an adjustment that has been predetermined as the differential factor from the paper to the canvas.  I then print as usual.  With a bit of experience one can determine the extra "pop" that the canvas will exhibit when coated.  I use Eco Print Shield and roll it on.  I can do a Matte finish, a Satin finish, a finish comprised of Satin and Gloss-50/50, or a High Gloss finish.  The customer's requirement determines the final coat.  However, to answer your initial question, I suppose it's simply a matter of taste that determines whether one prints on Matte or Lustre Canvas.  Some Lustre canvases are marketed with the tag that they do not require coating.  Personally, I would never let a canvas leave my premises without three finish protective coatings.  My customers appreciate the extra TLC their canvas prints receive before I hand them over to their new owners.  And one more note - I had initially tried the Lustre canvas and I found very early on that the coating tends to absorb into the matte canvas, as opposed to simply sitting on top of the Lustre finish canvas.  For that reason, I believe the protective factor of the coating is more pronounced on Matte Canvas than on Lustre Canvas.  Just my opinion, based on my own experience.   

I doubt this is the actual answer you were looking for, but thought I would try to add this to the conversation at least.  I hope it helps in some small way.

Gary 

     
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 09:23:28 PM by Garnick »
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mearussi

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 10:04:28 PM »

I've done extensive testing on many canvasses (over a dozen) both matte and glossy/luster along with various coatings. What I've discovered is that the punchiest looking combination is a luster/glossy canvas with a protective spray overcoat. This certainly produces the prettiest looking results, but not the most durable or longest lasting from a display point of view. Like many things in life the objects that are the most beautiful are also the most fragile.  So you have to decide what's more important to you, durability or looks. And yes, all matte uncoated canvasses look dull.

For durability choose a matte canvas and overcoat it with three light coatings of Eco Print Shield, the first two glossy and the final coat to determine surface reflectivity. This provides a very tough protective coating that, according to Wilhelm's tests, double display life. The drawback to me is that it also makes the canvas look like it's made out of vinyl plastic instead of canvas, which I don't really care for. But if you're more concerned about toughness than beauty this is the best way to go.

For beauty choose a glossy canvas and apply a spray varnish overcoat. I prefer the combination of Canson's Museum ProCanvas Luster (it has the smoothest surface of all the canvasses I've tested) and for the spray the PremierArt Print Shield because of the three I've tested (Moab, Hahnemuhle and Premier Art) the Premier Art increases both dmax and color saturation adding further to image "pop" whereas the other two leave the surface unchanged (which can be good depending on what you prefer). The drawback to spray varnish is that under extremes of temperature it can crack if you put on too heavy of a coating. Also it only increases average display life by approximately 25% instead of the 100% of the Eco.  The main advantage is that it retains the look of the original canvas surface. BTW, both coating products are made by the same company, Premier Imaging.

Which one do I use? This really depends on if I know it's final environment. If it's going into a heavily polluted room, say from smoking, or a very well lit room with either fluorescent or sunlight from large picture windows (office or professional building) then the matte canvas with the Eco Print Shield would be best.

But in a private home in a clean environment, then the Luster canvas with spray varnish overcoat wins.

 
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 10:22:16 PM by mearussi »
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Miles

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2017, 09:48:16 AM »

Thanks for sharing your findings on canvases and coatings.  I'm curious, did you try Breathing Color Lyve canvas and if so what were your impressions and how did it compare?  I've been using Lyve for some time and have been satisfied with the results but am always interested in others opinions. Thanks.
Miles
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mearussi

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Re: Need advise on canvas for art reproduction
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2017, 10:49:13 AM »

Thanks for sharing your findings on canvases and coatings.  I'm curious, did you try Breathing Color Lyve canvas and if so what were your impressions and how did it compare?  I've been using Lyve for some time and have been satisfied with the results but am always interested in others opinions. Thanks.
Miles
I have tried Lyve, and for a matte canvas it is very good, and it is actually what I use when I need a more durable canvas with the Eco Print Shield coating (I don't like the BC Timeless, it leaves streaks). But even with the coating it looks dull in comparison to a good glossy canvas with a varnish spray.

And if you're curious you can get free 24"x10' samples from Canson. Of all the canvasses I've tried their Museum ProCanvas Luster just stands out because of the extra smooth surface and the very soft and flexible 100% cotton canvas material. Combined with the Premier Art spray varnish it looks as good as the best paper for color saturation, dmax and contrast and almost for resolution because of the extra smooth surface.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2017, 11:01:38 AM by mearussi »
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