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Author Topic: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks  (Read 668 times)

pikeys

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K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« on: September 06, 2017, 05:32:21 PM »

Has anyone done any comparisons, between the Epson K3 inks,& the Canon Chroma life 100+ ink sets?
Any major differences?,quality,color??
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 06:03:07 PM by pikeys »
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NAwlins_Contrarian

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2017, 01:46:47 PM »

Quote
Has anyone done any comparisons, between the Epson K3 inks,& the Canon Chroma life 100+ ink sets?
Any major differences?,quality,color??

I'm not the best person to answer this, but seeing no other attempts, I'll suggest a clarification: are you sure those are the two inksets you want to compare? Because:
(1) Epson [UltraChrome] K3 inks are pigment inks, while Canon ChromaLife 100+ inks are dye inks. (Also, Epson's current dye photo inks are called Claria HD, and Canon's pigment inks are called Lucia, Lucia EX, or Lucia Pro.)
(2) The inksets that Epson specifically calls K3 have been replaced in new models; AFAIK the last K3 model was the R3000, introduced in 2011 and replaced by the P600 in 2014. The inksets that Canon specifically calls ChromaLife 100+ are the current ones, used in every Canon dye-ink photo printer introduced since August 2009.
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pikeys

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2017, 03:43:35 PM »

it is the ink that is used in the Canon pixma pro 100 printer,and I believe it is a pigment ink?
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Miles

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2017, 04:55:46 PM »

I have the Pro-100.  It is dye ink. 8)
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pikeys

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2017, 05:19:14 PM »

I contacted Canon, they informed me that the new Chroma life 100+ is supposed to make prints last 100?
Anyone know, if this is fact or, my customer rep,was smoking something at lunch??
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mearussi

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2017, 05:54:11 PM »

I contacted Canon, they informed me that the new Chroma life 100+ is supposed to make prints last 100?
Anyone know, if this is fact or, my customer rep,was smoking something at lunch??
They last 100 years in the dark. On display they have been rated for 40 years. This compares to the latest Epson pigment inks which have a display "rating" for around 200 years. The newest Canon pigment inks haven't been rated yet (we're all still waiting).
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pikeys

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2017, 06:21:21 PM »

LOL,that's what my estimate was,or,about?
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NAwlins_Contrarian

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Re: K3 inks Vs.Canon inks
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2017, 12:02:11 AM »

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I contacted Canon, they informed me that the new Chroma life 100+ is supposed to make prints last 100?
Anyone know, if this is fact or, my customer rep,was smoking something at lunch??

Any such time typically depends heavily on the paper used, how much light exposure the print gets, and how much ozone exposure the print gets.

The most comparable data for the Pro-100 / ChromaLife 100+ inks and the UltraChrome K3 inks I have are from Aardenburg, whose principal Mark is a regular here. His tests found that a Canon Pro-100 with its ChromaLife 100+ inks, printing on Canon Photo Paper Pro Luster LU-101, has a light-based fade rating of 57 megalux*hours; and an Epson 3880 with its UltraChrome K3 inks, printing on Epson Ultra Premium Photo Paper Glossy, has a light-based fade rating of 54 to 67 megalux*hours. In other words, he found the two you mentioned pretty comparable on that specific test. But although light is probably the most typical cause of the fade we notice, there are other causes of fade, like ozone exposure, and Mark's tests IIRC are just about fading due to light exposure.
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