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Author Topic: Starscapes - Using Capture One to Filter Light Polution - continued  (Read 712 times)

Dave Rosser

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My worry about using the technique outlined in my previous post was that I would have washed away star colours at the same time as removing the light polution.  Below are 1:1 crops for comparison - the bright star is Vega.

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Alan Smallbone

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Re: Starscapes - Using Capture One to Filter Light Polution - continued
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2017, 11:20:57 AM »

Your technique is interesting however you should shoot the Milky Way and try it and see how it affects the overall color. As you might find you are really removing a lot of color, but maybe not depending on how narrow and how close you are getting to the light pollution spectrum. I have found that light pollution is more greenish than yellow, here is a picture showing some of the light pollution that I get even at somewhat remote sites because of all the large cities:
MW-start-end by Alan Smallbone, on Flickr


As a side note in this image you posted you cannot tell if you have still have star color or not. Vega is most likely already blown out and lacking in color, and it is white star anyways. A better choice would be something like Antares, which is a yellow-orange star and or Betelgeuse which is now coming up in the early morning skies.
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Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA

Dave Rosser

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Re: Starscapes - Using Capture One to Filter Light Polution - continued
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2017, 11:51:50 AM »

Your technique is interesting however you should shoot the Milky Way and try it and see how it affects the overall color. As you might find you are really removing a lot of color, but maybe not depending on how narrow and how close you are getting to the light pollution spectrum. I have found that light pollution is more greenish than yellow, here is a picture showing some of the light pollution that I get even at somewhat remote sites because of all the large cities:
MW-start-end by Alan Smallbone, on Flickr


As a side note in this image you posted you cannot tell if you have still have star color or not. Vega is most likely already blown out and lacking in color, and it is white star anyways. A better choice would be something like Antares, which is a yellow-orange star and or Betelgeuse which is now coming up in the early morning skies.
Thanks for the comments.  I am going to have to wait a few months to get good view of milky way, this time of year in UK the nights are still short and the days long. By mid-winter when we get good frosty clear nights and Orion is high in the sky I will have another go though I might also get an opportunity in Spain in a few weeks time.
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Alan Smallbone

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Re: Starscapes - Using Capture One to Filter Light Polution - continued
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2017, 11:10:43 AM »

Here is a filter that will remove light pollution, not cheap but from the samples seems to do a decent job.
https://www.capturelandscapes.com/nisi-natural-night-review/

Post processing to remove light pollution can be tricky to not lose too much of the image, this may or may not help.

Alan
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Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA

Dave Rosser

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Re: Starscapes - Using Capture One to Filter Light Polution - continued
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2017, 12:01:13 PM »

Here is a filter that will remove light pollution, not cheap but from the samples seems to do a decent job.
https://www.capturelandscapes.com/nisi-natural-night-review/

Post processing to remove light pollution can be tricky to not lose too much of the image, this may or may not help.

Alan
Thats interesting, Thanks.
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