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Author Topic: Photographing the Eclipse  (Read 1150 times)

JoeKitchen

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Photographing the Eclipse
« on: August 20, 2017, 12:18:31 PM »

How can photographing the eclipse damage your camera? 

I have captured images looking directly at the sun with my tech camera in the past and have not noticed any adverse effects, but for longer usage, is this something to be worried about? 

I was thinking about using a 55mm or 90mm with a 2-stop grad ND filter at f/22 or higher.  Could this still cause damage? 

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Joe Kitchen
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Wayne Fox

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2017, 12:57:56 PM »

How can photographing the eclipse damage your camera? 

I have captured images looking directly at the sun with my tech camera in the past and have not noticed any adverse effects, but for longer usage, is this something to be worried about? 

I was thinking about using a 55mm or 90mm with a 2-stop grad ND filter at f/22 or higher.  Could this still cause damage?
Most of the time when shooting the sun, it is low on the horizon, so less chance of damaging a sensor.  Also LiveView vs dSLR changes the amount of time the sun can burn a hole into the sensor.

As far as what to use it depends on what you are after. If you are trying to capture during totality, the grad might work OK.  Most are wanting to show the black disc of the moon moving across the sun fairly clearly.  To do that requires a huge amount of density, not sure a 10 stop ND filter will allow that.  special solar filters are closer to 20 or 25 stops.

I shot the annular eclipse a few years ago, where the moon is smaller than the sun so it doesn't completely block it. During the time of full coverage I think almost 98 or 99% of the sun is covered, yet you still can't look at it with your eyes.  The shot is a stack, one exposure for the foreground and sky, one exposure for the sun.  The sun was shot with 13 stops of neutral density which did allow me to sort of capture the moon in front of the sun.

The second picture is what we here in Utah and Idaho are saying i-15 will look like starting later today and tomorrow.  As of a week ago, all rental cars were gone with the demand for those flying into SLC and driving up into Idaho.  I was thinking of going somewhere to view the eclipse, but it sounds like a nightmare getting there and back.

MTGFender

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2017, 03:42:42 PM »

Wynne,

The picture is very beautiful (only the first one) :)

We plan to go to WY tomorrow. I start to be very concerned after I see your second picture. My daughter wants me to take pictures of the eclipse. I ordered the solar film from B&H but they later informed me they ran out.

I plan to use the Canon 5DS and 100-400mm with/without 1.4 teleconverter. I've had one circular 10-stop ND, one square 10-stop ND and one 20-stop ND. How many stops do I need? I will absolutely not look at the viewfinder but will use the live view. I will leave the P1 at home although it's not because the internet rumor the sensor could be burnt.

Thank you
Pramote
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 03:52:17 PM by MTGFender »
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Wayne Fox

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2017, 10:49:35 PM »

I've had one circular 10-stop ND, one square 10-stop ND and one 20-stop ND. How many stops do I need? I
Hard to say.  I guess you have plenty of time to test it as the moon moves across the sun.

Once it covers the sun, you don't need a filter for that brief two minutes of totality.  But from what I'm reading, experiencing what is going on around you is more interesting than trying to take a shot of the sun itself.

good luck.

Joe Towner

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2017, 12:23:38 AM »

The Lee is about 16 stops, but really, at this point if you haven't practiced and have a solid plan it's better to just experience it.  There are folks shooting with every possible lens and camera combination.  C700 with a 50-1000mm lens - yep.  3x 6k RED monochrome cameras? Yep - http://www.fdtimes.com/2017/08/13/filming-the-solar-eclipse-aug-21/

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JoeKitchen

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2017, 10:46:52 AM »

The Lee is about 16 stops, but really, at this point if you haven't practiced and have a solid plan it's better to just experience it.  There are folks shooting with every possible lens and camera combination.  C700 with a 50-1000mm lens - yep.  3x 6k RED monochrome cameras? Yep - http://www.fdtimes.com/2017/08/13/filming-the-solar-eclipse-aug-21/

I believe this is what I am going to do.  I'm not much for a close up of the sun, and like Wayne pointed out, its the summer in the middle of the day so no landscape shot is really possible. 
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
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MichaelEzra

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2017, 05:03:24 PM »

Here is the peak of the eclipse from New York in my backyard:)
https://youtu.be/zVmSbn4cEpc
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 05:51:05 PM by MichaelEzra »
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JoeKitchen

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2017, 08:05:33 AM »

Here is the peak of the eclipse from New York in my backyard:)
https://youtu.be/zVmSbn4cEpc

That is really nice Michael. 
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
“Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”  William Faulkner

MichaelEzra

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2017, 02:02:42 PM »

That is really nice Michael.

Thanks, Joe!

MTGFender

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2017, 09:26:58 AM »

Hard to say.  I guess you have plenty of time to test it as the moon moves across the sun.

Once it covers the sun, you don't need a filter for that brief two minutes of totality.  But from what I'm reading, experiencing what is going on around you is more interesting than trying to take a shot of the sun itself.

good luck.

Thank you Wynne!

I ended up going to Glendo, WY.

It's one of the best experiences in my life! You're right. It's not only the eclipse but also the effect of it. It was the most quiet moment I've ever witnessed. Even the crickets stopped chirping. The effect to the light was indescribable.

It's absolutely well worth it. It took us 12 hours to drive back home (for 210 miles) ! The Roads were Chaotic like your 2nd picture but people were surprisingly very calm and patient.

I will absolutely do it Again in 7 years.

Pramote
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NancyP

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2017, 09:22:48 PM »

Me too. And it's in my backyard! (well, about 2 hour drive to mid-totality). I didn't get great landscape eclipse shots, but I did have lovely totality corona shots to process, had a blast and a relaxing (if ghastly hot) day at a favorite wildflower hiking spot of mine, and the experience was far better than the photography. Just the sounds of the cicadas suddenly going silent, and the murmurs of the fellow watchers rejoicing at the drop in temperature from 96 to 86 degrees  ;D . Best of all - calm geeky people enjoying the outdoors and enjoying some astronomy.

Next time - add a 360 degree setup to capture 360 degree sunset
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alan_b

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Re: Photographing the Eclipse
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2017, 04:06:37 PM »

Looks like there were some casualties: Lens Rentals

Good illustration of why the solar filter goes in front of the lens!  8)
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