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Author Topic: Getting this Black and White Look...  (Read 1884 times)

jtanj

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Getting this Black and White Look...
« on: July 28, 2017, 04:18:09 PM »

Hi

Does anybody know of any tutorials (Lightroom or Silver Efex) that could get me this look below:
Photos are by Maxim Chelak. When i asked him his process many years ago he told me he lith prints then scans to digitize.  photo58
photo3
photo31

thanks!
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Mark D Segal

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2017, 07:31:23 PM »

The Lightroom tutorials on this website, as well as the B&W chapters in Martin Evening's books on Lightroom CC and Lightroom Transformations provide very useful guidance on how to control the appearance of B&W conversions. It's straightforward practical instruction that doesn't require going through all kinds of hoops to achieve the effects you may want.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml

Alan Goldhammer

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2017, 07:52:03 AM »

there are also several good books that cover all different types of B/W conversions.  These are three that I have found useful. 

Vincent Versace, "From Oz to Kansas: Almost Every Black and White Conversion Technique Known to Man" focuses more on using Photoshop than Lightroom but the linear appoach to learning how to use the tools is well presented.

George DeWolfe, “B&W Printing:  Creating the Digital Master Print” discusses how Lightroom can be used to produce outstanding black and white images.  I did not pay any attention to the author’s new software tool that is supposed to improve the perceptual quality of the print.

Leslie Alsheimer and Bryan O'Neil Hughes, "Black and White in Photoshop CS4 and Photoshop Lightroom" covers all aspects of black and white transformation using the two key Adobe software products.
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stamper

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2017, 08:16:30 AM »

I don't think there is a "special" look to these images. They are high contrast. Setting your highlight and blacks to the clipping point in any converter will give you the "look"

Telecaster

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2017, 03:01:00 PM »

Make lith prints & then scan 'em.  ;)  Short of that: move your black point in from the left and your white point in from the right, then tweak mid-tones as desired.

-Dave-
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GrahamBy

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2017, 09:46:40 AM »

As above... but you can have some fun using split toning as well...
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Damir

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 07:20:17 AM »

Hi

Does anybody know of any tutorials (Lightroom or Silver Efex) that could get me this look below:
Photos are by Maxim Chelak. When i asked him his process many years ago he told me he lith prints then scans to digitize.  photo58
photo3
photo31

thanks!

This is not Lith print - look here how Lith print looks like:

http://www.timrudman.com/printing-processes/lith/1

This is ordinary high contrast black and white images.
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Telecaster

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 03:48:10 PM »

This is not Lith print - look here how Lith print looks like:

http://www.timrudman.com/printing-processes/lith/1

This is ordinary high contrast black and white images.

The images are claimed to be from scans of lith prints. Dunno if the claim is true, but I see no reason to dismiss it. Scans can be processed.

Anyway, there are a variety of lith "looks" besides the typical high contrast one.

-Dave-
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Damir

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2017, 06:32:06 PM »

The images are claimed to be from scans of lith prints. Dunno if the claim is true, but I see no reason to dismiss it. Scans can be processed.

Anyway, there are a variety of lith "looks" besides the typical high contrast one.

-Dave-

I did hundreds of various lith prints, if those are lith prints they are made to look like ordinary prints on grade 4 paper. Mastery of it's own - how to spend time making lith prints not to look like lith prints  ;)
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rdonson

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2017, 12:31:39 PM »

This may not be the answer the OP is looking for but.... I can get looks like that shooting with my Fuji X-T2 with Acros film simulation + tweaks.  In camera shoot RAW+JPG and then in Lightroom set the "Camera Calibration and Profile" to one of the Acros profiles for the RAW.  Adjust to taste.  This approach provides the added benefit of seeing in black and white in the EVF/OVF.  Tweaks can be applied in camera for the JPEGs.  If you like the look of the JPEG you can go with the JPEG or adjust the RAW file in Lightroom to match.

Just seems like an easier approach rather than printing LITH then scanning.
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Regards,
Ron

Tim Lookingbill

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Re: Getting this Black and White Look...
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2017, 01:33:56 PM »

Crushed blacks and hazy over cranked highlights? Looks like what I got shooting with a prime lens SLR for my high school annual with 35mm B&W film and processed at my local one hour lab.

Reduce sharpeness, back off Clarity and apply a point curve that crushes shadows and flattens detail in highlights in the 150-200 RGB regions as on the faces shown in the OP's sample.
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