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Author Topic: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models  (Read 2091 times)

BJL

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Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models—and EVF cameras
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2017, 08:56:14 PM »

What about getting rid of the LCD screen altogether and replacing it with a flip/tilt EVF, such as the Canon EVF-DC1?
I love the idea of a tilt-able EVF, but there are also times when I prefer to have the camera away from my eye. One is macro photography at close to ground level; another is photographing people, where I can make eye contact and talk with them, just checking framing by glancing down at the tilted-up screen. But the biggest one for others is probably video, where two-eyed viewing can be far more comfortable than squinting through an eye-level VF for a long period of time.

Between modern IS of about five stops and good old-fashioned tripods, composing on the rear screen is not always the recipe for blurry images that some people seem to think!
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EinstStein

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #21 on: July 25, 2017, 10:55:29 PM »

I remember Sony is the first to make IBIS. But if you check out Sony's point and shoot, all modern (after 2010?) cameras without interchangible lens are using optical stabilizer, indicating optical stabilizer is more preferred. Sony is clever. They make IBIS so that its camera can use other brand lenses.

 




Why don't Canon and Nikon have IBIS in their DSLR's?

Because they sell without it, and they get to charge more for lenses with IS. And they want to hold something back to add to the next model to persuade people to upgrade, and to gradually upgrade their shorter lenses to IS.

Pentax has a pivoting screen on the K1. Sony A9 etc already mentioned. Over the next few models, I predict there will be more pivoting screens and more IBIS (since the Tamron and Sigma IS in their lenses now).

It would be nice to have a pivoting screen to allow discreet waist-level street shooting... but not so much that I'm going to rush out and buy a Pentax KP.
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Farmer

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #22 on: July 25, 2017, 11:20:37 PM »

I remember Sony is the first to make IBIS. But if you check out Sony's point and shoot, all modern (after 2010?) cameras without interchangible lens are using optical stabilizer, indicating optical stabilizer is more preferred. Sony is clever. They make IBIS so that its camera can use other brand lenses.

They make cameras and lenses with stabilisation (they bought Konica Minolta's tech which was in-camera, of course) and when you combine them guess what, it uses the best of each.  Both have advantages and disadvantages.  Using both is "more preferred" :-)
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Phil Brown

BJL

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #23 on: July 26, 2017, 01:58:10 PM »

I remember Sony is the first to make IBIS. But if you check out Sony's point and shoot, all modern (after 2010?) cameras without interchangible lens are using optical stabilizer, indicating optical stabilizer is more preferred. Sony is clever. They make IBIS so that its camera can use other brand lenses.
Sony uses its new 5-axis IBIS in its two most recent ILCs, including the new top-of-the-line A9, so I doubt that Sony considers IBIS inferior for those cameras. That 5-axis IBIS innovation from Olympus and then Sony does things that are not possible with in-lens stabilization. Different trade-offs might be at work for fixed lens compacts; for one thing, the cost saving of having a single IS unit (in the body) vs needing one in each lens does not apply with fixed-lens cameras.

But of course as Farmer says, the best results will be got if both IS systems can be used in concert, as both Olympus and Panasonic are moving towards in the Micro Four Thirds system.


P. S. I doubt that any camera maker chooses an inferior stabilization technology in order to help customers buy third party lenses instead of their own ones! Lens sales provide a substantial portion of profits for ILC systems.
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Jim Kasson

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2017, 03:09:42 PM »

Sony uses its new 5-axis IBIS in its two most recent ILCs, including the new top-of-the-line A9, so I doubt that Sony considers IBIS inferior for those cameras. That 5-axis IBIS innovation from Olympus and then Sony does things that are not possible with in-lens stabilization. Different trade-offs might be at work for fixed lens compacts; for one thing, the cost saving of having a single IS unit (in the body) vs needing one in each lens does not apply with fixed-lens cameras.

But of course, as Farmer says, the best results will be got if both IS systems can be used in concert, as both Olympus and Panasonic are moving towards in the Micro Four Thirds system.

And Sony already does with the IBIS-capable a7x and a9 cameras and native OSS lenses.

Jim

scyth

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2017, 04:13:10 PM »

I remember Sony is the first to make IBIS.

Minolta... Sony inherited.

But if you check out Sony's point and shoot, all modern (after 2010?) cameras without interchangible lens are using optical stabilizer, indicating optical stabilizer is more preferred. 

I am sorry - but how is the solutions implemented in cheap P&S cameras are indicating that something is better ? as noted Sony, Olympus and Panasonic nowadays allowing both IBIS and OIS to work together combining the best features (like rotation along optical axis that can be compensated only by IBIS in principle with long tele lenses where OIS apparently does better work vs IBIS for some other shifts, etc ) when possible...
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BJL

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Re: Why flip/tilt LCD normally only in lower end models
« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2017, 04:35:42 PM »

To merge two discussion threads — this one and Nikon D850: Announcement of an Announcement of Development, here is a rumor that Nikon's new highest resolution body will have a tilt-screen: https://nikonrumors.com/2017/07/26/breaking-first-nikon-d850-press-photos-leaked.aspx/
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