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Author Topic: Fast Driving  (Read 3549 times)

LesPalenik

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2017, 10:59:01 PM »

Quote
there was a law firm that would report potholes to the NYC highway department immediately after they learned of them from other citizens.  That way, if someone damaged their car driving through one after the report, they could sue and get a recovery judgment.  The law is written that if the city did not know about the pothole beforehand, you couldn't sue.

So, in other words, the creation and tracking of potholes can be beneficial for some legal practitioners.

Alan Klein

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2017, 11:14:25 PM »

So, in other words, the creation and tracking of potholes can be beneficial for some legal practitioners.
Yes.  If I recall correctly, if you hit a pothole, you would call this lawyer who had the receipts that he reported the pothole to the City prior to your hitting it and damaging your car.  Then he would take your case and sue for damages.  I don't know if he really made money at it.  But he used to advertise so maybe it stirred up business for him.  I think it helped push the city to get repair crews out faster to repair the potholes which was a good thing.  Anyone who's hit a pothole and had their teeth rattled keeps a dark thought in their mind for the people who care for NY roads. 
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Rob C

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2017, 04:37:23 AM »

The problem with hitting a pothole is worse than you might think.

We hit a pothole here in Mallorca one day - it was pouring and the pothole was invisible as defined puddle because the entire road was soaking wet. It was in town here, and there was no speed involved, just two almighty bangs as both wheels on one side hit the hole. When we got home I checked for damage and there was none visible; even the alloys looked fine.

About three weeks later we were driving through France on our usual trips up to Scotland. We stopped for a break at one of the motorway service areas, and sat on a bench maybe twenty feet from the car. I happened to look at the thing, and noticed that in the crosslight of the sunshine, there seemed to be something struck to both tyres. I got up to have a look, and realised that both had a blister the size of an egg. We'd been driving at the legal max of 130kph for several hours... a blowout there and I wouldn't be sitting at this computer today. Potholes can do a lot more damage than just bend or break wheels. Seems that the invisible weakness they cause within tyres via pinching is even more dangerous.

Rob

LesPalenik

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2017, 06:28:38 AM »

I experienced also once a damaged tire which I noticed only by a chance when I stopped to take a picture on the highway and then walked around the car.
It was a 2-3 inch long tear or split showing only the inner layer on the rear tire, the outside layer was completely gone. It could have been caused also by such a blister or bubble which was gradually worn off, or maybe it was caused by driving faster than the tire rating. Anyway, at that time I was still about 40km from my home and the nearest garage, so I proceeded carefully at a very slow speed, and fortunately made it home without a blown tire.

A friend of mine wasn't as lucky. He drove in a Ford Explorer when his front tire blew on the highway and the car rolled over. The car was a total write off, but he miraculously escaped only with small scratches.

Otto Phocus

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #24 on: July 25, 2017, 06:28:06 AM »

Potholes + low profile tires + Alloy wheels = expensive day
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Rob C

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #25 on: July 25, 2017, 06:35:52 AM »

Potholes + low profile tires + Alloy wheels = expensive day

That's my problem! But hey, they look so coooool, being low... I used to notice BMWs with very low profile tyres during my trips back to the UK; I wouldn't make more than a mile here using such rubber. Perhaps they work very well on a real racetrack - no perhaps, they do - but in the greater outside world...

;-)

Rob

Alan Klein

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2017, 08:17:07 AM »

That's my problem! But hey, they look so coooool, being low... I used to notice BMWs with very low profile tyres during my trips back to the UK; I wouldn't make more than a mile here using such rubber. Perhaps they work very well on a real racetrack - no perhaps, they do - but in the greater outside world...

;-)

Rob
Years ago I leased an Acura Legend.  Great fast car but unfortunately had low profile tires.  I had 2 or 3 tire blowouts.  Fortunately, the car was stolen after a year.
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Larry Heath

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2017, 12:29:56 PM »

This is a prime example of breathless adjective ladened click bait journalism, anything to drive traffic to a website.

145 to 150 mph (238 km/h kilometers per hour, NOT KNOTS that would be around 278 mph, km/h is 148 mph) in that car is basically like driving at freeway/interstate speeds in the US; most anyone can reliably and safely do it. That car in particular provides a pretty large margin of safety and drivability, even at speed, simply because of its quality and design characteristics. Just because she is a grandmother and 79 does not disqualify her as being physically or mentally incompetent to do so. I have relatives in their 80s Id feel safer driving with, at speed, in most any car and that one in particular, than my ex-partner in racing, who has crashed a number of our race cars through the years. Though he likely has a bit better physical wherewithal to drive fast, he has a less than perfect attitude about how to do so; he has very little ability to sense his own limits, and will drive well beyond his ability to recover from his mistakes. He is likely a more dangerous driver in any car at 70 mph than Granny at 150 mph particularly in that car.

Some cars, as well as people, are unsafe at any speed, yes for sure. In this case I know the car is safe at all but its ultimate limits and likely granny is not going to challenge her limits or the cars limits just for shits and giggles.

Much ado over nothing!

Later Larry
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James Clark

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2017, 03:51:07 PM »

This is a prime example of breathless adjective ladened click bait journalism, anything to drive traffic to a website.

145 to 150 mph (238 km/h kilometers per hour, NOT KNOTS that would be around 278 mph, km/h is 148 mph) in that car is basically like driving at freeway/interstate speeds in the US; most anyone can reliably and safely do it. That car in particular provides a pretty large margin of safety and drivability, even at speed, simply because of its quality and design characteristics. Just because she is a grandmother and 79 does not disqualify her as being physically or mentally incompetent to do so. I have relatives in their 80s Id feel safer driving with, at speed, in most any car and that one in particular, than my ex-partner in racing, who has crashed a number of our race cars through the years. Though he likely has a bit better physical wherewithal to drive fast, he has a less than perfect attitude about how to do so; he has very little ability to sense his own limits, and will drive well beyond his ability to recover from his mistakes. He is likely a more dangerous driver in any car at 70 mph than Granny at 150 mph particularly in that car.

Some cars, as well as people, are unsafe at any speed, yes for sure. In this case I know the car is safe at all but its ultimate limits and likely granny is not going to challenge her limits or the cars limits just for shits and giggles.

Much ado over nothing!

Later Larry

I dunno... there's a world of difference between freeway speed of 80 or even "fast" driving at 100-120, and 150 mph.  At 150, allowable reaction times are minimal, many cars are producing significant (i.e. dynamics altering amounts) of lift and any sudden input that changes the car's balance can have an immediate and unpleasant effect if the wheel is turned  :)

Understand that I'm not disagreeing with your basic premise - going 150 mph alone isn't a one way ticket to certain death - but to liken it to highway cruising speed is downplaying the significant differences in braking distances, closing speeds and vehicle stability one encounters at that velocity.  (I've been a high performance driving instructor for close to 20 years, and currently instruct at Circuit of the Americas here in Austin, TX.  I've hit 165 in a directly comparable car as a point of reference.  I wouldn't dare to come close to doing it on a highway)
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bcooter

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2017, 04:28:35 AM »

That's my problem! But hey, they look so coooool, being low... I used to notice BMWs with very low profile tyres during my trips back to the UK; I wouldn't make more than a mile here using such rubber. Perhaps they work very well on a real racetrack - no perhaps, they do - but in the greater outside world...

;-)

Rob

Actually, most full fledged race cars have high profile tyre for a lot of reasons.  One is weight, unless the rules allow for carbon fiber wheels, another is the give of the tyre.  Most race cars are very rigid and higher profile allows for some flex, especially due to the excessive negative camber they run.  But the real reason is a rule change in high end race cars is very costly.   (sorry to go off topic).

In regards to driving fast, I don't advocate driving dangerously, but in the UK fast driving accounts for only 3% of the motorway deaths.  Not that is good, but it's not the main cause of serious traffic accidents and when in California I sometimes I go out to death valley check out a section of road and take my fastest car up to 150 or so and since the German's test their cars there it's nothing to be passed by a Porsche going 180.  I will tell you that's a shock.

But living on the west side of LA and in London, I'd much rather drive the motorways in the UK than the U.S.   Even in heavily congested London, it's 10 times safer than LA or anywhere in America.

In fact I find most of Europe to be a drivers delight, especially the glass smooth highways of France. Few people misuse the passing lane, everyone uses their turn signals changing lanes and they seem to take driving seriously compared to the U.S., not everyone, but most drivers are very good.

What I find incredibly dangerous are bicyclists, everywhere.   Going from central London to Shoreditch and Hackney, is a nightmare during rush hour.  There are thousands of bicycles and they ride wherever they want, run stop lights, hit pedestrains on the sidewalk and are responsible for over 62% of the pedestrian deaths which is 63 people.  Probably more because the London police don't publish all the facts.  3 times on Old street I've been forced into the opposite lane by cyclists and it's a miracle no one was hurt.  When Boris was mayor he build a $240 million bike super highway, with the intent of keeping the bicycles off the road, but soon realized that they only use it when they want to.    He built it with the rational of 9 to 11 bike riders get killed every year, but nobody will mention if they are at fault. 

But if London is crazy with the bike riders, try the west side of LA.  Skate borders going 30 mph on the sidewalk, bike riders everywhere, wobbling around and running the lights, the worse and most frightening are mothers with those suv sized kid strollers just pushing them out in the middle of the street, not even looking at traffic. One day it was the fright of my life.  On Abbot Kinney a busy street a woman with her husband in the middle of the road, no zebra crossing just the  road, pushed the kid in front of my car.  I locked it up, swerved and almost hit an on coming car. 

Anyway, back to bike riders and London.  They have made it so crazy that they are loathed.  One of them kept bumping my car from behind and finally hit the boot (trunk).  I got out and said what is your problem and his response, "I'm saving the world by going green and you and your fancy M series is in my way . . . buy an electric car."   

I won't repeat my response here.

But I drive fast, only where it's safe, only had two speeding tickets in my life and 120 mph in short bursts from Bristol to London is not unheard of.


IMO

BC


       
« Last Edit: August 05, 2017, 06:24:16 PM by bcooter »
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Rob C

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2017, 05:40:36 PM »

Actually, most full fledged race cars have high profile tyre for a lot of reasons.  One is weight, unless the rules allow for carbon fiber wheels, another is the give of the tyre.  Most race cars are very rigid and higher profile allows for some flex, especially due to the excessive camber they run.

In regards to driving fast, I don't advocate driving dangerously, but in the UK fast driving accounts for only 3% of the motorway deaths.  Not that is good, but it's not the main cause of serious traffic accidents and when in California I sometimes I go out to death valley check out a section of road and take my fastest car up to 150 or so and since the German's test their cars there it's nothing to be passed by a Porsche going 180.  I will tell you that's a shock.

But living on the west side of LA and in London, I'd much rather drive the motorways in the UK than the U.S.   Even in heavily congested London, it's 10 times safer than LA or anywhere in America.

In fact I find most of Europe to be a drivers delight, especially the glass smooth highways of France. Few people misuse the passing lane, everyone uses their turn signals changing lanes and they seem to take driving seriously compared to the U.S., not everyone, but most drivers are very good.

What I find incredibly dangerous are bicyclists, everywhere.   Going from central London to Shoreditch and Hackney, is a nightmare during rush hour.  There are thousands of bicycles and they ride wherever they want, run stop lights, hit pedestrains on the sidewalk and are responsible for over 62% of the pedestrian deaths which is 63 people.  Probably more because the London police don't publish all the facts.  3 times on Old street I've been forced into the opposite lane by cyclists and it's a miracle no one was hurt.  When Boris was mayor he build a $240 million bike super highway, with the intent of keeping the bicycles off the road, but soon realized that they only use it when they want to.    He built it with the rational of 9 to 11 bike riders get killed every year, but nobody will mention if they are at fault. 

But if London is crazy with the bike riders, try the west side of LA.  Skate borders going 30 mph on the sidewalk, bike riders everywhere, wobbling around and running the lights, the worse and most frightening are mothers with those suv sized kid strollers just pushing them out in the middle of the street, not even looking at traffic. One day it was the fright of my life.  On Abbot Kinney a busy street a woman with her husband in the middle of the road, no zebra crossing just the  road, pushed the kid in front of my car.  I locked it up, swerved and almost hit an on coming car. 

Anyway, back to bike riders and London.  They have made it so crazy that they are loathed.  One of them kept bumping my car from behind and finally hit the boot (trunk).  I got out and said what is your problem and his response, "I'm saving the world by going green and you and your fancy M series is in my way . . . buy an electric car."   

I won't repeat my response here.

But I drive fast, only where it's safe, only had two speeding tickets in my life and 120 mph in short bursts from Bristol to London is not unheard of.

Then again, my car is kept perfect, I obey most laws and take driving seriously.

Though in two weeks I'll buy an Aprilla Motorcycle in London, but not ride on sidewalks, not the wrong way down the street and won't u turn in the middle of the zebra crossing.

IMO

BC


     

The French motorways - I last drove there quite a few years ago - were wonderful, and not really expensive at all. The shock was coming off the Ferry at Dover and then onto the UK roads up to Scotland. Third World, from Dover to wherever in Scotland. And always under repair.

Cyclists. They used to come to Mallorca only in winter, and screw up the main roads by going side-by-side when roads were only okay for single lines of them behind the white edge strip. Now, they are here even in the hight of summer. If they don't get heat-stroke they die by car. Or just come back again. Even those riding alone seem unable to stay on their side of those white lines, but stray into the car track because of the greater chance of punctures in their own zone.

And they pay nothing towards the cost of the roads.

My fear is that in trying to stay well clear of them, and not knock them off balance due to slipstream, the car will end up too far over towards the oncoming traffic lane. A truck doing the same evasive thing on the other side of the road doesn't leave much room for error.

Enjoy your M!

Rob

jeremyrh

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2017, 04:24:45 AM »


What I find incredibly dangerous are bicyclists, everywhere.   Going from central London to Shoreditch and Hackney, is a nightmare during rush hour.  There are thousands of bicycles and they ride wherever they want, run stop lights, hit pedestrains on the sidewalk and are responsible for over 62% of the pedestrian deaths which is 63 people.
 

Some actual facts, from the Office of National Statistics:

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Deaths (persons) |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Year | (a) Pedestrian hit by | (b) Pedestrian hit by |
| | pedal cycle | car, pick-up or truck |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2006 | 3 | 233 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2007 | 6 | 267 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2008 | 3 | 247 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2009 | 0 | 141 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2010 | 2 | 123 |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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jeremyrh

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Re: Fast Driving
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2017, 05:14:11 AM »


Cyclists. They used to come to Mallorca only in winter, and screw up the main roads by going side-by-side when roads were only okay for single lines of them behind the white edge strip. Now, they are here even in the hight of summer. If they don't get heat-stroke they die by car. Or just come back again. Even those riding alone seem unable to stay on their side of those white lines, but stray into the car track because of the greater chance of punctures in their own zone.

And they pay nothing towards the cost of the roads.


Spanish cyclists don't pay taxes? Woo-hoo!! Where's my bike gone?
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