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Author Topic: Backlit Bird 2  (Read 1227 times)

Rob C

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Backlit Bird 2
« on: July 15, 2017, 05:38:30 AM »

Making a sort of "Enga-land swing"s kind of interpretation, herewith backlit bird of another feather:



;-)

Rob C

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2017, 07:19:17 AM »

[ X ] Stretching it
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Oscar

Farmer

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2017, 09:13:26 AM »

Very distracting, with a nice crop ;-)
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Phil Brown

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2017, 09:38:19 AM »

It's good that you cropped out all those distracting tree branches.
This doesn't look a bit like the birds of either Farmer or Glenn Bartley.  ;)
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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website (Server is back up). New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2017, 10:15:40 AM »

It's good that you cropped out all those distracting tree branches.

Then why stop short of that birds' nest on her head? ;-)
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Oscar

RSL

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2017, 10:33:02 AM »

From the look in her eye and the set of her mouth I'd say: "Don't mess with this girl."

Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2017, 12:26:35 PM »

From the look in her eye and the set of her mouth I'd say: "Don't mess with this girl."

Bird of prey, Russ. Messing is not advised.

Lucky to get her - calendars weren't her main thing.

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2017, 12:32:05 PM »

Then why stop short of that birds' nest on her head? ;-)

When I consider the lack of nest on top of my own head, I can only envy the chick.

;-)

Rob

Telecaster

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2017, 05:39:30 PM »

Love the fine (as in not fine at all) grain in this one, Rob!  :D

-Dave-
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Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2017, 04:44:33 AM »

Love the fine (as in not fine at all) grain in this one, Rob!  :D

-Dave-

Thanks Dave! Took a little time doing it all from a Kodachrome 64 Pro scan! In its own way, Kodachrome has the same fault as digital: too good; too clinical. And it doesn't blow up huge like grain, more like wriggling worms on a plate.

I have another shot, below, from '66 and on Plus X, which I shot on an Exakta with a 3.5/135mm Tele-Xenar, and is a crop from about the same half-length scale or wider. I was in that horrible condition where you are newly in business and have no money, so I was using up whatever films I'd bought along the road to that point. I later settled on Ilford for all my 135 format back/white.



Real grain is, well, organic! (How's that for curator speak!)

;-)

Rob

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2017, 08:39:09 AM »

Rob,
The film matters little. What matters is that you had the eye, even back then.

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website (Server is back up). New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

RSL

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2017, 08:48:15 AM »

Exactly, Eric. It's the only thing that matters.

Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2017, 12:15:24 PM »

Eric, Russ: there's little credit in having 'eye' because that's mostly part of the package that you consist of as you come dancing into this world. Some have maths, some science and others shape, colour and sound. Some fortunate souls have 'em all, but can then remain uncertain for the rest of their lives.

That's why I put such store in having good technical teachers, hands-on folks who don't fill your head with ancillary nonsense that matters not a jot, but do make sure that you know how to do what it is that you are supposed to know how to do. Photography is mostly verb, with a little adjective thrown in sometimes.

Perhaps today we need people who can teach you very early on all that anybody needs to learn about Photoshop. It's that sort of world: learn how to retouch like hell; get yourself a PhD in silken purses and sows' ears. My experience with analogue was that the best thing you could do was to standardise: find a formula that worked very well for you, and do your damndest to have a darkroom where you could maintain those standards. That's one of the reasons why farming out processing of black/white didn't lead to wonderful, peaceful living. Labs aren't you, no matter how often you use them. They are pretty much bound to be all things to all men, so end up being somewhere in the middle. If you had the time to stand behind a printer's shoulder, you had time to print for yourself. Don't do that, and you get the printer's version of your snap.

And worst of all: there's a thing, a get-out-of-jail-free concept labs employed called "commercially acceptable."

;-)

Rob

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2017, 01:10:33 PM »

Eric, Russ: there's little credit in having 'eye' because that's mostly part of the package that you consist of ...

Oh, cmon Rob, you know darn well what they mean and they're right: what use are photoshopskillz if all that it means will always be a multitude of (mostly far east) robots that can do it cheaper and better than you anyway?

The trick is to find your signature self. In your images, in your art, or in life in general.
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Oscar

Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2017, 02:09:44 PM »

Oh, cmon Rob, you know darn well what they mean and they're right: what use are photoshopskillz if all that it means will always be a multitude of (mostly far east) robots that can do it cheaper and better than you anyway?

The trick is to find your signature self. In your images, in your art, or in life in general.

It's been lost in translation or just sloppily phrased by yours truly.

Of course "eye" matters, it's indispensible. My point was that you have to take that for granted. It's not something wonderful for which you should take credit as if you'd suddenly invented it for yourself. That talent, if you have it, is your signature self, as you put it.

If you don't have it in you, forget courses for they can't make you see when you're blind, so to speak. I would not equate PS skills with robotics: their use depends on your own tastes and sensibilities, and the difficulty there is in knowing what the tools can do and how to use them. If they do have a problem it's in that they can permit too much fine-tuning. It's somewhat similar (a darkroom print) to making a song in one take rather than in re-recording and cutting and pasting until all the bits mate properly and in tune. The beauty and curse of Layers, then.

Fats Domino sounds lazy, but it takes talent to do what he does; Jerry Lee Lewis takes Hank Williams music and makes it his own, and for me, infinitely better and more passionate. That's talent. It's already there, inside the soul, or whatever you call the part of you that is sensitive to those things around you.

I think we are saying pretty much the same thing, you and I.

Rob

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2017, 02:17:17 PM »


Of course "eye" matters, it's indispensible. My point was that you have to take that for granted. It's not something wonderful for which you should take credit as if you'd suddenly invented it for yourself. That talent, if you have it, is your signature self, as you put it.


Ah, yes, now i get your point.
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Oscar

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2017, 02:36:16 PM »

I believe the most important aspect is to have someone at an early age who helps to notch (but not force) you to find your signature self, develop your appreciation and talents, help select a preferred direction, etc. Sure it can be done independently, as we mature, but it will come out a lot later and it usually involves a lot more energy (overcoming preconceived hurdles for example) and you'll therefore be less productive.
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Oscar

RSL

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2017, 03:10:49 PM »

That's not always the way it works, Oscar. I know a kid who's grandpa was a music teacher. His mom, the grandpa's daughter wanted him to become a music teacher. So he did, and he taught music to little kids. I saw him do it and he did it very well. He also became a quite accomplished musician. But in the end he became an extremely competent software engineer. That was so far away from his mom's desires that it was pathetic, but he found he loved it. Though he plays in a band occasionally, his first love is developing software.

An eye is inborn, as is a musical ear, as is interest in the wonderful, complex world of putting together yeses and nos to make a machine do what you want it to do. If you don't have inborn talent, no amount of study is going to give it to you.

opgr

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2017, 03:23:47 PM »

An eye is inborn, as is a musical ear, as is interest in the wonderful, complex world of putting together yeses and nos to make a machine do what you want it to do. If you don't have inborn talent, no amount of study is going to give it to you.

Yes, I agree, and like I said: enough people are forced by circumstances to find their signature self themselves thru life. It can be done, but it could have been developed more easily earlier on, just like it is easier to learn a language earlier in life.

And I also agree that some of human talent is inborn, though signature self obviously isn't restricted to becoming an artist. Having said that, I do believe that recognising that one doesn't have a certain talent is part of appreciating other people's talents or skills (and thereby one's role in life).
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Oscar

Rob C

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Re: Backlit Bird 2
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2017, 03:29:46 PM »

That's not always the way it works, Oscar. I know a kid who's grandpa was a music teacher. His mom, the grandpa's daughter wanted him to become a music teacher. So he did, and he taught music to little kids. I saw him do it and he did it very well. He also became a quite accomplished musician. But in the end he became an extremely competent software engineer. That was so far away from his mom's desires that it was pathetic, but he found he loved it. Though he plays in a band occasionally, his first love is developing software.

An eye is inborn, as is a musical ear, as is interest in the wonderful, complex world of putting together yeses and nos to make a machine do what you want it to do. If you don't have inborn talent, no amount of study is going to give it to you.

+ 100%

With music, all I can do is play it via the Internet most of my waking day long; perhaps just because I can neither play any instrument (despite owning a guitar from the age of twelve to my late teens) nor sing, I give these talents value far beyond any photography which, for me, is easy to do in the way that I want to do it. Well, it would be, if I still had access to the models, which I do not.

Rob C
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