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Author Topic: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project  (Read 941 times)

Robert Roaldi

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Watch , about 7 mins long.
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Rob C

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2017, 05:57:28 PM »

Thanks, Robert, I enjoy watching this kind of film. Speaks volumes about the march of "progess".

Rob

Robert Roaldi

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2017, 06:17:16 PM »

Thanks, Robert, I enjoy watching this kind of film. Speaks volumes about the march of "progess".

Rob

You might also enjoy this podcast (sorry, not a film) about another hard-hit American town: http://www.npr.org/2017/02/06/513713606/glass-house-chronicles-the-sharp-decline-of-an-all-american-factory-town. We own some Anchor-Hocking glass storage bowls (glass version of Tupperware).

More and more, thinkers are beginning to question the wisdom of giving so much power to the financial classes. As more and more of a nation's wealth is absorbed into financial circles, it raises the question, what good is it doing the rest of us? I've said it before in these pages, and it is not an original thought by any means, once we start to behave as if we are all here as a support system for the moneyed classes, rather than viewing commerce as a just another cultural tool to be used for our benefit, then we've lost. And the sad thing is that there really seems to be a lot of people who believe that the commercial classes are NOT beholden to the surrounding culture. They have made the magical and illogical leap, seemingly unaware that they have done so, from "sometimes government behaves inefficiently" to "government is bad".
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degrub

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2017, 06:21:24 PM »

more like a leap to " the rules don't apply to me" and anything that gets in the way needs to be put in its' place.
Nothing has really changed since the middle ages and the rule of princes. Just a different title.
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Rob C

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2017, 08:52:55 AM »

You might also enjoy this podcast (sorry, not a film) about another hard-hit American town: http://www.npr.org/2017/02/06/513713606/glass-house-chronicles-the-sharp-decline-of-an-all-american-factory-town. We own some Anchor-Hocking glass storage bowls (glass version of Tupperware).

More and more, thinkers are beginning to question the wisdom of giving so much power to the financial classes. As more and more of a nation's wealth is absorbed into financial circles, it raises the question, what good is it doing the rest of us? I've said it before in these pages, and it is not an original thought by any means, once we start to behave as if we are all here as a support system for the moneyed classes, rather than viewing commerce as a just another cultural tool to be used for our benefit, then we've lost. And the sad thing is that there really seems to be a lot of people who believe that the commercial classes are NOT beholden to the surrounding culture. They have made the magical and illogical leap, seemingly unaware that they have done so, from "sometimes government behaves inefficiently" to "government is bad".


It's not confined to the US by any means; I recently watched a tv report on the Scottish town of Paisley, which I knew rather well.
Apart from being where I finished school, it was where I had my first studio for some years. Such temporal fame aside (joke), it was traditionally strong for its two big cotton companies, Clarks and J&P Coats, that became the biggest thread producers in the world, with branches in the States, amongst many other countries.

But all that died in Paisley during the second half of last century: the original factories closed, and attempts to replace that work with steel production and car factories also came to sticky ends, the latter not entirely without the help of industrial political sabotage and the stupidity inherent in putting a car manufacturing company into a logical vacuum, a place where the engines had to be shipped hundreds of miles from Coventry, down in southern England. Paisley is now a mess; don't know about Coventry. As for the Clyde's shipyards, echo Newcastle-upon-Tyne and the rest of them.

Yes, there is a huge problem associated with cheap labour in other countries, something that makes local production look more expensive, but perhaps it could be avoided, not by government-inspired/ruled isolationism, but by the customer base realising that buying foreign-made is ultimately going to cost you your own job. I have no problem with the concept of foreign car companies such as BMW setting up in the US, for example, and selling their US-made machines there. I do have a problem with the same companies then marketing those cars elsewhere at prices that may undercut the cost of buying the same car were it made in other lands where it might have been made just as easily and well.

BMW makes the Mini in England, and I can remember shortly after the financial mess of '08, with the pound in free fall against the euro, that I needed to change my old car for something new. (Really bad synchronicites.) To my surprise, I noted that the price of the Mini, in Spain, part of the euro area, did not go down to match the fall in the pound - did not go down at all... It's hard to avoid the conclusion that business is just one gigantic stitch-up, everywhere. I bought yet another Ford instead, my sixth.

As for working wives, that's a topic so huge and complex that it deserves its own landscape, never mind thread!

Rob

Robert Roaldi

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2017, 10:06:09 AM »

This is now far off the photography topic but I came across another video you might like, , although I'm not sure that "like" is the correct term.

This one cuts close to home because I recently watched a documentary about Montreal (not exactly a dying backwater town), where, because grocery sales are now centralized in fewer but larger big box stores, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retired people (who do not drive) to buy food. So the marketers try to tell us that people want cheaper food so they have to abide by economies of scale and shut down local food stores. Sure, supply and demand, I know, I know. Meanwhile all those households have to drive so much now, since everything they do is far away, that every household needs to own a second car. Those apples are going to have be pretty cheap to offset the cost of owning a second car. But old folks in retirement residences can't walk to a grocery store. Simple changes in zoning could fix this. I know it would because I grew up in a neighbourhood in Montreal with three grocery stores within easy walking distance of our family home. It can be done.

We should not kid ourselves that what we have now is the result of the free market and that the government should not be involved. The zoning laws (among other things) that set this situation in motion were put into place for a reason, because someone lobbied for it to be that way, because it benefitted them.

We (north american culture) crippled our railroad services a generation ago because they were deemed to be "subsidized" by government, which was bad as everyone agreed. So now every highway is crammed with trucks 24/7. Do you think the free market is paying for all that damaged road surface and all those dead and maimed drivers involved in tractor-trailer accidents? Nothing is perfect, but when I hear that we're changing things to be more "efficient", I simply laugh now.
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Alan Klein

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2017, 04:00:45 PM »

You might also enjoy this podcast (sorry, not a film) about another hard-hit American town: http://www.npr.org/2017/02/06/513713606/glass-house-chronicles-the-sharp-decline-of-an-all-american-factory-town. We own some Anchor-Hocking glass storage bowls (glass version of Tupperware).

More and more, thinkers are beginning to question the wisdom of giving so much power to the financial classes. As more and more of a nation's wealth is absorbed into financial circles, it raises the question, what good is it doing the rest of us? I've said it before in these pages, and it is not an original thought by any means, once we start to behave as if we are all here as a support system for the moneyed classes, rather than viewing commerce as a just another cultural tool to be used for our benefit, then we've lost. And the sad thing is that there really seems to be a lot of people who believe that the commercial classes are NOT beholden to the surrounding culture. They have made the magical and illogical leap, seemingly unaware that they have done so, from "sometimes government behaves inefficiently" to "government is bad".
So your suggestion is to redistribute wealth.  It's been tried many times including recently in the Soviet Union, and it failed.  As long as men are free, some will through their efforts or luck gather more wealth than others.  In any case, our economy has much redistribution anyway.  Social Security, Medicare, Obamacare, Medicaid, food programs, Veterans Administration, public education, highway, bridges and other infrastructure, etc.  However, if you go where I think you want to go, like the Soviet Union you would kill incentive and make the country so unproductive it would self-destruct like they did.  Fortunately, or unfortunately as the case may be, we in America haven't experienced first hand what happens in an all powerful, unlimited government.  Maybe Slobodan will tell us. 
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Robert Roaldi

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2017, 04:24:41 PM »

So your suggestion is to redistribute wealth.  It's been tried many times including recently in the Soviet Union, and it failed.  As long as men are free, some will through their efforts or luck gather more wealth than others.  In any case, our economy has much redistribution anyway.  Social Security, Medicare, Obamacare, Medicaid, food programs, Veterans Administration, public education, highway, bridges and other infrastructure, etc.  However, if you go where I think you want to go, like the Soviet Union you would kill incentive and make the country so unproductive it would self-destruct like they did.  Fortunately, or unfortunately as the case may be, we in America haven't experienced first hand what happens in an all powerful, unlimited government.  Maybe Slobodan will tell us.

You have just put a lot of words in my mouth. I never said any such thing, I never advocated redistribution of wealth nor any of what follows from it. What are you talking about?
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Robert
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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2017, 05:07:19 PM »

You have just put a lot of words in my mouth. I never said any such thing, I never advocated redistribution of wealth nor any of what follows from it. What are you talking about?

It's the result of the hammer of ideology whacking a structure not built with nails. Makes a hollow thunk.

-Dave-
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Alan Klein

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2017, 10:26:11 PM »

 
[/quote]
You have just put a lot of words in my mouth. I never said any such thing, I never advocated redistribution of wealth nor any of what follows from it. What are you talking about?
  But it seems that's what you're suggesting.  First off America already redistributes huge portions of wealth.  Look at your payroll stub and notice the difference between Gross pay and Net pay.  Also add in the 7.65% that your employer contributes to match your 7.65% for Social Security and Medicare.  Then add in all the other taxes like sales tax, gasoline tax, etc that local communities, states and the Feds add in over that.  All that money is redistributed.  The government decides what to do with your hard earned dollars.  You work for it and then they take it and move it around to make people think they're getting something so they get re-elected. 

Then they create class warfare to fool you into believing its the other guy who's taking your money.  When there's not enough money from taxes, they borrow from the Chinese or print it devaluing the money that was left as net payroll so you can buy less stuff for your family.  The money you put away for savings if you have any thing left over, dissipates due to inflation because of the printing.  When you complain how tough it is, they tell you to blame the rich investor class who are the ones who take risks to invest money to create new business and more jobs so you can make a living.  So the politicians who do a poor job of monetary and fiscal stewardship, get you to think its the real creators of wealth in the country who are at fault.  One day we'll wake up and be Venezuela. 
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Damon Lynch

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2017, 11:30:53 PM »

Alan, you strongly believe in a world where social hierarchy is natural. Where people are poor because it's their own fault. Where some are dominant because they deserve to be. You dislike the Soviets so much not because they were authoritarian, but because their authoritarianism is not your kind. You like authoritarianism when it keeps people 'in their place', so to speak.

The political choices you make demonstrate you to be a fervent ideological believer in massive wealth transfer. You advocate the destruction of the world's natural capital, which is theft on a planetary scale from generations yet to come and from the other species with which we share this planet.

Therefore it's not surprising that you latch so readily onto the themes of wealth transfer and the Soviets. You're projecting onto others that which you find in yourself.
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Alan Klein

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2017, 12:29:16 AM »

Alan, you strongly believe in a world where social hierarchy is natural. Where people are poor because it's their own fault. Where some are dominant because they deserve to be. You dislike the Soviets so much not because they were authoritarian, but because their authoritarianism is not your kind. You like authoritarianism when it keeps people 'in their place', so to speak.

The political choices you make demonstrate you to be a fervent ideological believer in massive wealth transfer. You advocate the destruction of the world's natural capital, which is theft on a planetary scale from generations yet to come and from the other species with which we share this planet.

Therefore it's not surprising that you latch so readily onto the themes of wealth transfer and the Soviets. You're projecting onto others that which you find in yourself.
Wow.  I never said or even thought those things.  I dislike the Soviet style system because it's not authoritarian. It's worse.   It's brutal, murderous, and takes personal, religious, political and economic freedoms away from the people under the guise of making everyone equally poor.  How can you compare the terror of Stalin who killed 20 million of his own people to enforce repressive Soviet state rule to constitutional and free America?    You really need to read a little history before making such an obscene comparison.  Look at North Korea and Cuba if you want to see what authoritarian like the Soviets really were. 
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Robert Roaldi

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2017, 06:34:53 AM »

 
  But it seems that's what you're suggesting ...

No, it's not.
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Damon Lynch

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2017, 09:36:13 PM »

Wow.  I never said or even thought those things.  I dislike the Soviet style system because it's not authoritarian. It's worse.   It's brutal, murderous, and takes personal, religious, political and economic freedoms away from the people under the guise of making everyone equally poor.  How can you compare the terror of Stalin who killed 20 million of his own people to enforce repressive Soviet state rule to constitutional and free America?    You really need to read a little history before making such an obscene comparison.  Look at North Korea and Cuba if you want to see what authoritarian like the Soviets really were.

I've actually lived in a post-Soviet state. Have you? I've seen how their governments work, and the culture that supports them. And I recognize an authoritarian when I see one.  Pretty hard not to really, it's so in your face.

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Alan Klein

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2017, 09:58:48 PM »

I've actually lived in a post-Soviet state. Have you? I've seen how their governments work, and the culture that supports them. And I recognize an authoritarian when I see one.  Pretty hard not to really, it's so in your face.


The American constitution has protected us against authoritarian government for over 200 years including the present.  To argue that other countries may be authoritarian doesn't mean anything here.  We're not. 
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TommyWeir

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2017, 04:02:39 AM »

To attempt to return to the project...

Really interesting use of landscape and portraiture as well as still life to create a space between 'documentary and fiction', telling stories.

I liked also his journey through it being a series of introductions to different people.  Gave it an authenticity I thought as well as he does live there.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 05:18:09 AM by TommyWeir »
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Sharon VL

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2017, 08:48:20 AM »

To attempt to return to the project...

Really interesting use of landscape and portraiture as well as still life to create a space between 'documentary and fiction', telling stories.

I liked also his journey through it being a series of introductions to different people.  Gave it an authenticity I thought as well as he does live there.

I agree. Beautiful, thoughtful tender work. Thanks for posting this.

Robert Roaldi

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Re: profile of photographer Jason Koxvold and an interesting project
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2017, 09:17:25 AM »

Along similar lines, for those of who are interested, there are several mini-docs about Appalachia here: https://vimeo.com/hollowdocumentary. I have not watched them all. They are not photography related but good quiet documentary stories about everyday lives.
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