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Author Topic: XT-2 advice  (Read 1592 times)

alex

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XT-2 advice
« on: June 06, 2017, 01:59:18 PM »

Hi - since I am now feeling slightly too old to go on lugging my D3 and assorted lenses up mountains, I am considering a switch to mirrorless APS-C, probably an XT-2 and a couple of zooms. Does anyone have any suggestions to make, alternatives, possible problems?

Thanks,
Alex

Ken Bennett

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2017, 02:52:41 PM »

The XT2 is a fine little camera. Random comments: I've been shooting Fuji almost 100% for about four years, and I find I usually shoot with the smaller prime lenses. I only grab the zooms for some specific reason -- this is totally different from when I shot Canon, and I went everywhere with 2 cameras and the 24-70 and 70-200 (and the 16-35 in the bag). Not sure why this is, but the smaller primes are excellent and I don't mind swapping lenses when needed. Right now I have in my bag the 14, 23/2, and the 50/2, though I'll also mention that my primary cameras are X Pro 2 bodies and the XT2's only come out when I have a need for them (usually for long lenses, or shooting/AF speed).

Be prepared for a very different AF system - it works well, but it's not the same as a DSLR and takes some getting used to. There are many little quirks in the menu system and the general handling of the camera. Fewer than in the past, but still quirky. :) Be prepared for changing your raw workflow - especially if you use Lightroom, and especially sharpening. The files will make terrific large prints, but again, something of a learning curve.

I do find shooting with the Fuji system a lot of fun.

Alternatives would include an Olympus OM1 system with their excellent selection of lenses. The whole system is noticeably smaller than the Fuji.
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john beardsworth

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2017, 03:28:51 PM »

The XT2 was my first Fuji (I've mostly used Nikon) and I've found it a very easy camera to like. Getting used to the electronic viewfinder took a while, and I still have moments when I don't like it - as well as times when it has advantages. I'd definitely recommend getting plenty of batteries as it's much thirstier than a DSLR. I had 3, bought a 4th, and may buy a 5th.
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rdonson

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2017, 04:56:48 PM »

I first purchased a Fuji X-T1 as my walkabout camera with the 18-135.  I hated lugging my Canon DSLRs around small towns that I like to visit in the Carolina.  I loved the analog controls and it took me back to my old Canon F1 35mm film days.  I fell in love with the camera, its size and weight and I've kept adding lenses.  I got the X-T2 as soon as it came out.  I've used it extensively and my Canon gear sits on shelves.

Depending on how you use the camera you will want extra batteries.  Most people do fine with 2 extras.

I got the Fuji battery grip for sports and wildlife and for when I simply don't want to change batteries.

I also got a Watson Duo LCD charger.  It allows me to charge two batteries at once and show you the state and progress of the charge.

So far I've acquired the Fuji 10-24mm, 60mm, 50-140, 100-400 lenses to go with my 18-35.  I also have a Rokinon 12mm f/2 for low light work.  On my list of future lens purchases is the Fuji 16-55.  This lineup replaces my all Canon gear except the fast 50mm.  I may get to that at some point in the future. 

Because of the lighter kit I've been able to use a lighter tripod and ball head.  If you're tired of heavy DSLRs you might also be tired of heavy tripods.

I don't know what you use to develop your photos.  Lightroom is my go to tool.  Unfortunately I've not been pleased with Lightroom's results for the X-T2.  I just couldn't extract the detail I was looking for.  If you experience that I recommend Iridient X-Transformer.  It works nicely as an "Edit in" app from Lightroom or to simply convert all your RAFs before IMPORT in Lightroom.  This is just my preference.  Others are quite happy with how Lightroom processes X-T2 files. 

Hope this helps,
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Ron

alex

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2017, 05:10:53 PM »

Thanks everyone, very helpful! Keep them coming

Alex

David Sutton

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2017, 06:29:16 PM »

You don't mention how you output your photographs, but the X-T2 files look great on 24" wide prints, and that's enough for most people.
I switched from Canon for a few reasons, weight and the EVF among the top ones. It's good having my entire kit in my backpack at an airport and asking the check-in person if they'd like to weigh it.
I had to really work at the layout of the controls and the set up of the EVF, but I guess that's the same  for any system. Now I'm on the whole much faster at them than I was with the 5D2.
You can increase the battery life by turning off the camera when it leaves the eye. In France last year I got over 700 shots on one battery. Actually double that I suppose as I had the camera set to raw + jpeg.
The kit lenses work just fine. I'd stay away from the 50-140 though. It's a sharpness and contrast monster that bulldozes every other zoom out of the way, and now I want to use it for everything even though the other smaller zooms would look the same for most prints. If you don't have my laziness, you'd probably be fine with three primes.
I'd second Ron's recommendation of X-transformer. I use Open Directly from The Photographers Toolbox to avoid Lightroom's messy "create a copy?" workflow. Photo Ninja also does a better job than Lightroom for raw conversion and is excellent at highlight recovery.
There are lots of advantages for mirrorless that I didn't appreciate until I picked one up and went out determined to make it work. Every now and then I get side tracked by the newest biggest sensor, but then have to shake myself and admit that for the work I do,  if I get an image from the X-T2 that's not up to scratch, it's my fault and not the camera.
David
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One Frame at a Time

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2017, 11:58:58 PM »

I've always been a crop sensor fan.  From canon to Sony to Panasonic.  I've been committed to fuji since they released the XE1. Why?  The Lenses! 
Almost without exception their lenses are fantastic.  With little need to cherry pick a good copy.  The 18-55 and 55-200 are amazing for their size and weight.  Also have a 14 and the 100-400.  Both are also great, but the 100-400 is no lightweight at 3 plus pounds.   
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brianrybolt

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2017, 04:24:56 AM »

If you need 'wide' their 10-24 is unstoppable and the 14mm prime is truly excellent.
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TommyWeir

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2017, 05:02:50 AM »

There are several reasons to choose Fuji.
- how the cameras work and physically operate.   Depending on your age, you probably learned on something that felt the same in your hand.  Yes, there's a big shift in how you use an electronic viewfinder around focus and exposure, but it's not difficult to pick up, in many ways an improvement over DSLRs.
- the lenses which are stellar, I would definitely add a prime to your wishlist.  The 35mm 1.4 or the newer f2 are phenomenal lenses.
- the JPEGs, yep, JPEGs you actually use. A good deal to admire in how the Fuji engineers bake in old film styles into their JPEG engine.

But overall, you pick Fuji to fall in love again, it's rekindles in many ways why you got into photography.   The camera nerd in me finds many things to admire in Sony's A series but Fuji got my money.

I use Capture One as my main processor, creative editor and photo manager.    I do also use Iridient Developer for the occasional detailed image, it's also very good.   I've printed up to 40" wide and the detail was phenomenal.  It's worth spending time on the sharpness and detail settings to finesse this for the X-Trans sensor.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2017, 05:07:56 AM by TommyWeir »
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armand

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Re: XT-2 advice
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2017, 02:15:25 PM »

I have a Fuji since X-E1, followed by X-T1 and now X-T2 and most of their non-pro lenses.
There is no good reason not the get the 18-55 as a kit if you find it.
From there it depens on what you shoot.

I see mentioned above that the m43 is much lighter but I think the difference is much smaller for equivalent things. The primes are smaller but not as fast as the Fuji while their pro zooms are as heavy and no sharper than the better nonpro zooms if you are willing to give up weather sealing. And this is my biggest problems with the current Fuji lenses. Lack of lighter weather sealed zoom lenses, and the reason I will still use the Olympus. Now they do tolerate some light rain for a brief period and it's not bad that this is the only problem I have with it.

Software wise the artifacts are more present but it's generally ok. I only use LR.
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