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Author Topic: Annie Leibovitz lighting question  (Read 3165 times)

UlfKrentz

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Re: Annie Leibovitz lighting question
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2017, 05:43:37 AM »

Absolutely true. But that has nothing to do with the point being made about who does the lighting/setup/production/post production.

I was refereeing to: "They set it up and she takes the credit." Nothing wrong with splitting up the task in a team, it is mandatory in film productions. Still, it is her approach to light things the way she wants it to be done and direct her assistants to do so. Thatīs why she takes (and deserves) the credit. YMMV.

Rob C

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Re: Annie Leibovitz lighting question
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2017, 11:20:19 AM »

I was refereeing to: "They set it up and she takes the credit." Nothing wrong with splitting up the task in a team, it is mandatory in film productions. Still, it is her approach to light things the way she wants it to be done and direct her assistants to do so. Thatīs why she takes (and deserves) the credit. YMMV.

Absolutely right. People know that they live or die by the results - no way that chances get taken unless the photographer is under the influence of whatever. at which point, work vanishes, bit by bit...

(" Posted by: Kirk_C
 on: Today at 01:49:36 AM

"Absolutely true. But that has nothing to do with the point being made about who does the lighting/setup/production/post production.")

But that doesn't mean that those doing the setting up are doing their own thing rather than the photographer's thing. Now, if the photographer allows somebody else to print/retouch for him, that's a different question, and a lot of other artistic powers/contributions come into play. Shifting a few lights around isn't such a big deal, especially in today's world where the results are visible at once, and changes made in no time. If the photographer doesn't pick up on something that displeases him or her at that moment, then yeah, the work isn't really his, but the mistakes are.

Regarding the rest of the process, I think the time always comes where the photographer has to say okay, that's the best I can do, now you can do what you want with what I just handed over to you. Then whose work is it? - the client's I guess, and he should take responsibility for what he commissioned and subsequently changed.

Rob
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