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Author Topic: Anyone have experience with 2D to 3D conversion?  (Read 1510 times)

uuglypher

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Anyone have experience with 2D to 3D conversion?
« on: May 25, 2017, 05:42:00 PM »

Does anyone have examples to post of 2D to 3D conversions?

Dave
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: Anyone have experience with 2D to 3D conversion?
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2017, 06:26:00 PM »

Does anyone have examples to post of 2D to 3D conversions?

Hi Dave,

Could you elaborate what you are looking for? Virtual Reality 360-degree panoramas (stills or movies), or Stereo photography/movies (anaglyph, printed pairs, lenticular, polarized glasses), or 3d modeling (CAD/CAM, or photorealistic/ray-traced rendering)?

Cheers,
Bart
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== If you do what you did, you'll get what you got. ==

uuglypher

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Re: Anyone have experience with 2D to 3D conversion?
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2017, 07:26:51 PM »

Hi, Bart,
I'm interested in the most basic techniques of using a single, 2D image as a basis for contriving a similar, yet disparate image  to make a stereo pair which, by stereopsis, will yield a 3D effect.
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BobDavid

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Re: Anyone have experience with 2D to 3D conversion?
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 07:56:25 PM »

Hi, Bart,
I'm interested in the most basic techniques of using a single, 2D image as a basis for contriving a similar, yet disparate image  to make a stereo pair which, by stereopsis, will yield a 3D effect.

There is a ton of literature on stereopsis and cameras. I have some stereo Kodachromes from the early 1950s. The stereo camera that took them had two lenses set a few centimeters apart. I don't remember the focal length of the lenses. Scenic stereo photos were common in the early 1900s; the viewing apparatus were rudimentary. ... The trick is to take two photos, approximately a few centimeters apart aligned along the X-axis. Depending on how close or far you are to the subject will influence the effect. This may help you begin your project. stereo photography For you to pull this off from a still image will require major work in Photoshop and a viewer. This is an exercise in art and science. You may want to look into lenticular photography. It's gimicky, but it does work.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 08:10:16 PM by BobDavid »
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