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Author Topic: Change in tactic  (Read 4046 times)

Colorado David

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2017, 12:21:43 PM »

Gitzo, RRS, Kirk. I find that my images are improved with the use of a tripod, both technically and compositionally. Yes there are times I would rather shoot hand-held, but I shoot a lot of video and have for years so I'm used to a tripod always being part of my kit.

Otto Phocus

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2017, 01:03:26 PM »

If you are looking for speed in set up, there are such things as automatic tripods, which is a kinda of misnomer but they set up pretty fast.

I do most of my shooting off of tripods and I agree with the previous comments about tripods and speed can sound odd.

But each photographer has different needs and what works for one photographer may not work for another.

Just remember, there is no best tripod.  All tripods are compromises.  Find out what is not too important for you and compromise on that.
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I shoot with a Camera Obscura with an optical device attached that refracts and transmits light.

lightskyland

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2017, 05:05:45 PM »

Quite often I am all packed up at the end of the day and ready to go back, when I see something new and worth it happening. With a quickly operated tripod, I can set up in a few seconds.

When I see something new and worth it happening, I just take a picture of it.

I use tripods when I absolutely have to (pre-dawn light or creamy water exposure, 1-2 seconds). That's it.
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lightskyland

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2017, 05:07:40 PM »

This is probably not what others will think/do.  I am using a tripod less and less.  \

Dropping the ball-and-chain of the tripod is the best thing I ever did for my photography!
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ben730

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2017, 05:36:20 PM »

Hi
On this site (http://blog.reallyrightstuff.com/the-closet-of-disappointing-tripods/)
I found the best advice in my opinion:
"My advice on buying a tripod then was to find the heaviest tripod you would be willing to carry, and then to buy the next bigger model."

I have several tripods, and the lightest I use is the Manfrotto MT057C3-G.
This tool is heavy enough to stay solid at the place it has to be.
The geared column helps to work fast and precise.
My 2 cents.



NancyP

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2017, 09:14:00 PM »

My advice is to buy a sturdy tripod with a hook on the underside of the plate where the legs meet. Then hang extra weight as needed. One or two water bottles on a carabiner hung from the hook adds 2 to 5 pounds and lowers the center of gravity of the whole shebang. OK, not totally convenient, but neither is hauling around an 8 to 12 pound tripod. Studio tripods are called that for a reason.
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BrownBear

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2017, 02:58:01 PM »

...sturdy tripod with a hook on the underside.... .....hang extra weight as needed.

We've found a neat solution along the lines of your suggestion:  We carry small mesh drawstring bags purchased from backpacking suppliers such as REI.  They weigh nothing and compress to nothing, but are always available to hang from the hook with the weight-of-the-moment.  Water bottle, spare lenses, rocks, even chunks of ice.  You name it.  Always along and always useful.  I think the last one I bought is 8"x12" collapsed, weighs an ounce, and cost under $10 on the REI sale table.

Beats the stuffings out of spending extra money for extra weight you have to lug all the time whether you need it or not. 
« Last Edit: April 12, 2017, 05:00:14 PM by BrownBear »
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NancyP

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2017, 09:38:47 PM »

I can go you one cheaper!   ;D   Mesh bags that used to hold 3 or 5 pounds of fruit or potatoes. Or, the plastic grocery bags that I stuff in my pocket to use for picking up trash on the trail. If I had a dollar for every "Gu" (trail runner's energy gel) packet I have picked up, I'd be on vacation now.. 8)
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BrownBear

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2017, 10:43:50 PM »

Atsa spirit!  :D
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RPark

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2017, 11:47:42 AM »

Gitzo Sytematic Series 3, w/ FLM 38FT head, set up with Arca Swiss compatible accessories, i.e. plates on cameras, e.g. Really Right Stuff L-bracket on my Fujifilm X-Pro2.

IMO, a lighter camera especially begs for a sturdy tripod (and/or extra weight hung from the apex).

Over the years, I've always tried to use a tripod when it made sense. Case in point: At the moment, I'm scanning negs for an old friend with whom I used to wander with our medium format cameras (both Mamiyas) more than thirty years ago. I always used a tripod; he didn't. Arguably, he had the better eye ... but, compared to mine, his negs are soft.
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BrownBear

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2017, 12:05:06 PM »

Good example, and representative of the experiences of many, I'm sure.

In a variation, we spent a day this winter with a friend photographing birds on a Florida rookery.  Comparing results a few days later was illuminating.  He's very good at hand-holding, to the point he doesn't even bother with a tripod when using his heavy Nikon 200-400 f/4, pumping ISO in exchange for a tripod- especially early and late in the day when most of the action occurred. He's also experienced with the rookery and the birds, garnering some really extraordinary behavioral shots. We're not so experienced with the birds or hand-holding, so we resorted to stout tripods and Wimberlys for our long heavy glass.

We didn't fare so well on capture, simply because the birds were smarter than we were and we weren't alert for the special moments he knew were coming. But he brought up an important difference as we compared results. We were shooting at 400 ISO or less most of the time, only popping up to 800 for brief periods in the lowest light.  The "slowest" ISO he used was 1600 with 3200 more his standard, popping even higher in the lowest light. 

He might have been much better at capturing the "moments" that made his images stand out. But his images suffered terribly for the high ISO's, and he's going to spend many a long hour at his desk trying to compensate. After comparing results with our lower ISO shots, he's also put in an order for a stout tripod and Wimberly.  ;D
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RPark

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2017, 12:24:23 PM »

Yes, I have a friend now with whom I go "bird hunting." He has a much bigger, heavier (500mm) lens than I possess but he too hand holds a lot of the time, while I mount my 400mm rig (200 with doubler) on a behemoth Jobu gimbal.

Same thing; he has to go for the high ISO. Of course to get as close, I have learned the art of stealth. :)
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 05:47:59 PM by RPark »
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rdonson

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Re: Change in tactic
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2017, 05:14:58 PM »

When I embraced Fuji's X-T1 I decided I could carry a lighter tripod.  After a lot of searching and reading I ended up with a Sirui N-3204X Carbon Fiber N Series 4 Section Tripod Legs 69.7" Height (I'm 6'4" tall).  I tried a few Sirui ball heads and ended up with the Sirui K-30X 44mm Ballhead.  It handles my X-T2 with battery grip and 100-400 just fine.  Best of all the build quality of Sirui is excellent and the weight is a lot less than what I was carrying around. 

I would have loved to go Gitzo or RRS but I didn't feel the need to take out a second mortgage. 

I'm considering a Jobo gimbal like Ray if I end up shooting birds more often that once a year.
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Regards,
Ron
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