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Author Topic: In the market for a 44/48 inch printer looking at Epson P10000......thoughts??  (Read 527 times)

ndwgolf

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Guys
Currently I have a Epson P807 printer, its a fantastic printer and used to do everything I ever needed from printing. But because it is limited to 17" maximum width I want to get something bigger for my house in Thailand.............Looking at my current cameras (Leica SL and S007) the SL files are perfect for the P807 but I feel I can get some more out of my S007.....what that more is I don't know, but i bet there are folks on here that will know that information
I've been looking at the P9000 and P10000...............I will be using this printer for personal stuff.
Epson is my current brand of choice but as always I am open to suggestions.

Thanks

 

Neil
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Wayne Fox

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The 10000 is a workhorse of a machine designed to print a lot of material very fast.  It is a 300 dpi based device (same as Canon and HP) and has a huge head which allows it to print faster than the 9000.  Jury is still out on whether the additional black really offers anything in the printing of photographic type images, I'm inclined to think not that much unless perhaps the work is mainly black and white.

The 9000 is the traditional 360 dpi device with max resolution up to 1440x2880 in the screen/dither.  It has orange and green inks which may offer better tonal gradations in some areas, although here again the difference in printing photographic images is probably not very significant.  It is a less expensive printer, and to me offers better top end quality potential when printing photographs.

Don't ignore the 8000, also a 44 inch printer with all of the features of the 9000 minus the green and orange inks.  Image quality side by side would be identical on nearly as the 9000 when printing photographic type images (the green and orange are designed to help prepress proofing achieve more pantone color matches).

The 8000/9000 have been around long enough now that and the reports are pretty positive in regards to missing nozzles and cleaning to indicate Epson did make improvements in this process.  I've had a 9000 for 15 months and have only had to run a clean on single channel a few times.  Other users have reported similar results with their new p6/7/8/9000 series printers.

There are many who are fans of HP and Canon on the forum as well and I'm sure they will offer information on the current state of those printers.  All 3 brands produce excellent results. There are also dozens of threads on this forum (this question gets asked at least once a week it seems).

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ndwgolf

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The 10000 is a workhorse of a machine designed to print a lot of material very fast.  It is a 300 dpi based device (same as Canon and HP) and has a huge head which allows it to print faster than the 9000.  Jury is still out on whether the additional black really offers anything in the printing of photographic type images, I'm inclined to think not that much unless perhaps the work is mainly black and white.

The 9000 is the traditional 360 dpi device with max resolution up to 1440x2880 in the screen/dither.  It has orange and green inks which may offer better tonal gradations in some areas, although here again the difference in printing photographic images is probably not very significant.  It is a less expensive printer, and to me offers better top end quality potential when printing photographs.

Don't ignore the 8000, also a 44 inch printer with all of the features of the 9000 minus the green and orange inks.  Image quality side by side would be identical on nearly as the 9000 when printing photographic type images (the green and orange are designed to help prepress proofing achieve more pantone color matches).

The 8000/9000 have been around long enough now that and the reports are pretty positive in regards to missing nozzles and cleaning to indicate Epson did make improvements in this process.  I've had a 9000 for 15 months and have only had to run a clean on single channel a few times.  Other users have reported similar results with their new p6/7/8/9000 series printers.

There are many who are fans of HP and Canon on the forum as well and I'm sure they will offer information on the current state of those printers.  All 3 brands produce excellent results. There are also dozens of threads on this forum (this question gets asked at least once a week it seems).
Wayne,
Thank you very much for the detailed feedback, I'm in no hurry to buy so look forward to more feedback especially regarding the Canon as a few folks over on the Leica forum rave about that printer.
Thanks again

Neil
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fisheye59

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Read This - Great info>>>
I now have two of theses z3200ps 44" printers last year we were getting strange banding. Trying to find an engineer to fix it and worrying it might be something bad! I looked on the web and found a lightly used one about a year old still with a few of the smaller original ink cartridges and bought it. The original printer only needed a service and a new drive belt very inexpensive so now I'm going to have peace of mind for many years to come. The printer manufacturers out there need to bring out a 60"+ version of this machine.


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