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Author Topic: BritexCom  (Read 922 times)

paulgrundy

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2017, 02:27:24 PM »

I'm an Aussie, I started this thread because we seem to expendable, Britain doesn't care about its Commonwealth allies.

Britain just dumped us when they entered the EU because they could. They were our greatest economic ally.

We have fought stupid wars in WW1, WW2, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq etc, non of our doing, we fought to support our allies.

Our trade links with China, Japan, America and Korea have enabled us to create a sustainable, vibrant economy.

I'm glad I'm not forced to sing God Save the Queen ever again.

Food for thought,

Tom, you see what has happened here? We Brits have hijacked your thread about Aussie UK relations and turned into a discussion all about us. A kind of jingoistic throwback to the days of Empire - we just can't stop thinking we are the centre of everything.

I would imagine that Australia and all the other Commonwealth countries will be hearing a lot more from us in the next couple of years. Something along the lines that we always loved you the most, we were just seduced by the proximity of all those people who would buy our goods and make us rich (if we ever made anything) But now we realise they only wanted us for our money & our jobs. We made a mistake, can you ever forgive us ? Can we give it another go?

Whinging Poms eh?

Paul



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Rob C

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2017, 03:44:24 PM »

I disagree with the mechanisms and the underlying politics, but I think Rob's perspective is what a lot of people see, and it's part of what is driving up the extreme-right movements across Europe: a mixture of fear of loss of security by the elderly and fear of loss of work by the young.

There is a very telling graph of industrial output vs industrial employment in the US: output has continued to grow linearly except for a small dip after 2008. However employment has dropped off a cliff. It's about automation, and the extreme right is claiming that it's immigration. The money from that continued growth is now going directly to whoever can afford to buy the robots, hence the extreme concentration of wealth, at the highest levels ever in the US, approaching 1910 levels in Europe.

So there are a bunch of young people, the least qualified of whom are no longer employable, who are unsurprisingly behaving badly, which feeds back into the security concerns. The right is exploiting it, the left is pretending it isn't happening, the unions are trying to protect the status quo on which their power depends while hanging the unemployed out to dry. None of them have any idea what to do (nor do I) and are busy lining their own pockets: the cynicism and corruption in French politics are breath-taking, but I doubt it's hugely better elsewhere.

   

Yes indeed, to me, the danger of the automation process has been painfully obvious all along, and I see it very clearly in what was my own profession, with the division of work reducing to the very top-end or the scraps nobody really wants... Was a time there were dozens of little commercial photographers working away and making a living in my own city of Glasgow. When I left, there were very few, most big studios going the way of the dodo. And we only have our own blindness to blame.

I can't remember the number of times that my lament on this topic (related to photography) has been countered with reference to buggy whip makers. As if the one excused the other, and the second most-used attack has been the old one about nobody owing the pro a living. Of course, no pro ever imagined that anyone did owe him a living - I think most of us always knew the commercial battles that would lie ahead: you hardly go pro without having had some real work experience in the field - how would you know where to start? But hey, what about that imaginary level playing field when you do hang out your shingle?

But yep, the robots and the machines are killing off the very people who would once have been earning the money to be customers for whatever product somebody is hoping to flog. I watched part of the UK Budget reports this evening, and the self-employed have today seen a rise in their national insurance contribution that "brings them in line" with whatever the employed pay, "which is only fair!" Not one politician interviewed mentioned the fact that the self-employed do not get all of the same benefits as the employed: no paid holiday as right, they have to provide for their own non-state pension, if they can afford one (paid for at least in part by the employer in the case of the employed person). The underlying, fake political assumption, again as sop to the LCD, is that all the self-employed are making a bloody fortune and getting away with murder. And that coming from a Conservative government that really should know better, and I'm damned sure does. The reality is that many do what they do simply because they love it, despite hardly making ends meet, and have no alternative but to keep on fighting for what they believe in, and yet others are self-employed because they are, frankly, otherwise unemployable, but it's better than doing nothing.

Yesterday I read in a local newspaper an analysis of the state of employment on this island. The big thing was a graph showing the ratios of the overqualified and the underqualified for the work they were actually doing. It's sad to see so many well qualified people working in lowly paid manual jobs they could never have imagined themselves obliged to do when they were being educated. And it's not even a new European phenomenon: back in the 60s I remember my mother returning from one of her trips to Italy and telling me about the statistics there, where so many university graduates were unemployed. Yes, back then. I read this to be an indication of the huge flaw that currently faces Britain, where there is this political cant suggesting everybody needs to have a higher education. The same people fail to explain where the well qualified will all fit! They also fail to explain (but not fail to blame) how teachers are supposed to bring the dumbest in their classes up to the standard of the brighter. It can't happen because of the reality that all people are anything but mentally equal, are far from being equally committed, and many seldom receive the total help at home that education demands. So what happens? In order to be seen to be doing something there's a never ending flow of government-inspired changes to the way teaching is done, targets are brought in, thrown out and replaced with more fantasies.

So what about jobs for the less academically able? My son used to tell me about friends he had, working as plumbers and sparks, making a grand a week. Yet, there seems to be a political blindness regarding those jobs - which hardly need university educations - and an absolute focus on bullshit about equal higher education for all, whether that's needed or was even ever possible, everybody willing to finance it. It's basically just another crazy manifestation of political correctness being forced upon the world, like it, need it or not.

It's all a friggin' mess


« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 03:54:48 PM by Rob C »
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tom b

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #22 on: March 12, 2017, 01:22:01 PM »

"So what about jobs for the less academically able?"

They're in China making Trump baseball caps, Melania fashion designs and Nike sportswear.

Cheers,

Rob C

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #23 on: March 12, 2017, 03:40:38 PM »

"So what about jobs for the less academically able?"

They're in China making Trump baseball caps, Melania fashion designs and Nike sportswear.

Cheers,


Ah, but more cheaply than our "less academicallies" - and that's the worldwide problem that will see the cycle move from country to country as each new cheap place becomes tomorrow's too expensive, and in the end, the work will come back to the earlier expensive countries that will no longer seem expensive!

Mr Trump's banking on that cycle - maybe he just jumped into the thing too soon, and the Rust Belt has a bit longer to wait before it need dust itself down and start clearing away the old mothballed factories to make way for the new...

Unless we manage to wipe ourselves off the face of Earth first, I guess that's how the thing's going to run: a perpetual changing of the guard.

Rob C

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jeremyrh

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2017, 10:26:10 AM »

This has to be the most disgraceful and disgusting post I've seen on this forum. LuLa is not a nice place to come to anymore.
It's not so disgusting; it is profoundly ignorant, but that's another matter. Coffee Corner is the Post-Truth part of LuLa. If people made similar claims about, say, lens resolution, they would be hanged from the nearest lamp-post, but here it is the standard mode of behaviour to write outlandish nonsense without a shred of proof.

Interesting times.
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Alan Goldhammer

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2017, 11:43:06 AM »

Moe on the lemmings syndrome:

http://www.heraldscotland.com/business/15178439.Ian_McConnell__Companies_moving_fast_to_shift_activities_out_of_UK_as_Brexit_looms/?ref=eb
I think EU based organizations will be forced out of London once Brexit is triggered.  The European Medicines Evaluations Agency is located at Canary Wharf and has a fairly large staff (though some are only in town during the work week, flying home on cheap flights for the weekend).  When I was still in the pharma industry I did some work with them.  Leaving London will be a blow as these are all very high salaried jobs.
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Rob C

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Re: BritexCom
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2017, 04:25:16 PM »

As somebody suggested, this end of LuLa attracts a wide variety of persons.

On balance, I feel it's fairly strong on the right, rather empty of the centre but overflowing on the radical left. What a pity. Maybe it's a part of the wannabe luvvies thing; you know, feeling as one with Hollywoodian elite and all... or just a morbid ignorance, a last-stand at proto-Communism, perhaps.

Oh well, it's either a blemish or a beauty spot. Who gives a damn?

Rob
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