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Author Topic: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.  (Read 1393 times)

JohnBeasley

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Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« on: February 11, 2017, 04:20:04 PM »

Just curious has anyone else this combination on here?
Picked up the new 16-35 this week and was pretty stoked to go to the national park in Killarney this week to try it out, but good lord the vignette once the polariser went on.
I know lee have a new slimline landscape polariser, which im going to pop up and try on Monday morning, but I struggle to see how it could be that much better. 
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shadowblade

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2017, 02:41:17 AM »

Try the Lee filter holder with a 105mm CPL. Works better for any UWA than a screw-on.

But every UWA is going to vignette heavily with front filters. Light coming from 60 degrees off-axis (for a 120-degree angle of view) passes through twice the thickness of filter compared with light coming parallel to the axis. Thus, 1 stop of loss in the middle becomes 2 stops at the edge, 2 stops in the middle becomes 4 stops at the edge and so on. Rear filters are far better when they're available.
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JohnBeasley

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2017, 06:40:35 AM »

I have the standard Lee polariser, and I just cant get over the vignette on it. Iv been reading up since I came back and the landscape version is ment to fix it, but I will be amazed if it does.
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Alto

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 10:51:03 AM »

Hi John

The Lee landscape polariser is much much slimmer than the original one .
I have used it with the 16-35 mk2 f2.8 and the f4 version if you are having problems you could always use the 100mm sq glass cir polariser .

I take it you are using the WA adaptor ring??


Hope the helps


Jon
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JohnBeasley

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2017, 02:48:41 PM »

Yeah been using the slim line, I'll just have to try out the new one and see how I fare with it.
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Rod.Klukas

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2017, 08:09:47 AM »

Using a polarizer with ultra-wide lenses does cause another issue. As maximum polarization occurs at 90 degrees to the axis of the light source you may notice one side of the image much more polarized than the other side, particularly in skies.  Or the center of the image, assuming you are pointed at a 90degree angle to the light source/sun, is very blue while the edges on either side are much more pale(un-polarized).  The tools in post can be better at darkening a sky, when using wide lenses.
also the curvature of the edge of the wide angle lens verses the flat surfaces of the filter, can also result in some loss of sharpness near the edges.
Just an observation...
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FelixBelloin

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Re: Canon 16-35mm mark iii and Lee filters.
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2017, 05:20:36 AM »

Using a polarizer with ultra-wide lenses does cause another issue. As maximum polarization occurs at 90 degrees to the axis of the light source you may notice one side of the image much more polarized than the other side, particularly in skies. 

I second that, it can be a real pain to adjust for this in post. I have ruined a couple of great shots from places I am not about to visit again soon, and with insight I would not have used a polariser. No matter how good you are in PS or LR, it's really difficult to even the exposure seamlessly.

Felix
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