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Author Topic: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?  (Read 2893 times)

adias

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2017, 05:17:12 PM »


What you've done, actually, is underline my own problem with landscape: again, it's been proven that landscape is best used as background to something else. ...

Rob

Well done! :)

ripgriffith

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #41 on: February 05, 2017, 08:14:37 PM »

Wow, you can really learn a lot about people by how they responded to this post, from the very generous to the very self-protective... very interesting.
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adias

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2017, 12:38:15 AM »

It looks pretty much like every other 911 ever made, doesn't it? Apart from the lack of a picnic table on the back, of course  ;)

Jeremy

You mean like this one parked on the Apple campus? :)

kikashi

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #43 on: February 06, 2017, 03:59:13 AM »

You mean like this one parked on the Apple campus? :)

Of course not! Anyone can see that that one is red.

Jeremy
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Rob C

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #44 on: February 06, 2017, 03:59:47 AM »

No, this one has a picnic tray:



From my discontinued series on the cellphone - a waste of time. (IMO)

Rob

razrblck

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2017, 05:43:23 AM »

Let me contribute!

First one is in Pistoia, the other two in Viterbo.





Rob C

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2017, 06:01:26 AM »

Okay, the first one may, just may have a distant family connection to a Porsche; the second one might even be made from recycled Porsche, but the third, the Saintly P 1800 one, is not at all to do with the same family.

However, you may be abe to claim Scottish Rootes roots for the latter, because I remember seeing a trailer laden with unpainted P 1800 shells driving along near Linwood, Paisley... I only saw that once, because our local engineering unions must have seen it too, and quickly dealt with that piece of nonsense! Steel works indeed! What a cheek! We need revolution, not work!

;-)

Rob

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #47 on: February 06, 2017, 09:43:10 AM »

No, this one has a picnic tray:



From my discontinued series on the cellphone - a waste of time. (IMO)

Rob
Those 911s and Caymans are sissy cars.
The last real man's Porsche was the type 356 Carrera (vintage ~1955). My brother and I bought one that had been raced for 10,000 miles,  killing the engine. When we got it, it had a roller-bearing "Super" engine it it, and the roller bearings soon seized up, after which a plain old Volkswagen engine was put in it as a loaner while the Super engine was rebuilt.

But it still said Carrera on the back, which intimidated any other sports cars that came near.

And no picnic table either.
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adias

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2017, 01:09:47 PM »

Those 911s and Caymans are sissy cars.
The last real man's Porsche was the type 356 Carrera (vintage ~1955). ...

Like this one? :)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2017, 04:15:25 PM »

Like this one? :)
That's pretty close. But ours was white and well used. Our nickname for it was "Poor White Trash."
I don't recall those fancy rings around the headlights, so I think your image is a bit later.

The earliest Porsches were structurally so similar to the VWs of the day that when our Porsche engine quit, the service guy could simply drop a VW engine in its place and the bolts all lined up perfectly. But the heater ducts didn't, so we had no usable heater for the winter while waiting for the engine to be rebuilt.

I think I posted a photo once of the engine compartment with the VW engine. I'll see if I can find that again.
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KLaban

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #50 on: February 06, 2017, 04:39:32 PM »

Those 911s and Caymans are sissy cars.
The last real man's Porsche
was the type 356 Carrera (vintage ~1955). My brother and I bought one that had been raced for 10,000 miles,  killing the engine. When we got it, it had a roller-bearing "Super" engine it it, and the roller bearings soon seized up, after which a plain old Volkswagen engine was put in it as a loaner while the Super engine was rebuilt.

But it still said Carrera on the back, which intimidated any other sports cars that came near.

And no picnic table either.

My emphasis.

That's exactly what I love about the Cayman, there's no raging testosterone involved, she's all female and beautiful curves. Not sure if I want to drive her or fuck her but admit that could just be raging testosterone talking.

;-)
« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 04:44:23 PM by KLaban »
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Rob C

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #51 on: February 06, 2017, 05:31:25 PM »

My emphasis.

That's exactly what I love about the Cayman, there's no raging testosterone involved, she's all female and beautiful curves. Not sure if I want to drive her or fuck her but admit that could just be raging testosterone talking.

;-)

Ride 'n' drive.

Unlike with a camera, you can do them both at once.

Does testosterone come as pills? My question is just out of curiosity; I have as much use for testosterone as I have for a Porsche. However, were somebody to throw in a Ferrari instead, then I might find renewed interest in both directions: car and pep pil.

To be brutally honest, I'd really rather just make some final, stunningly beautiful fashion pictures somewhere, but there you go - the Ferrari's probably a more realistic option, not that it's an option if I want good one.

;-(

Rob

adias

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #52 on: February 06, 2017, 05:49:28 PM »

That's pretty close. But ours was white and well used. Our nickname for it was "Poor White Trash."
I don't recall those fancy rings around the headlights, so I think your image is a bit later.

The earliest Porsches were structurally so similar to the VWs of the day that when our Porsche engine quit, the service guy could simply drop a VW engine in its place and the bolts all lined up perfectly. But the heater ducts didn't, so we had no usable heater for the winter while waiting for the engine to be rebuilt.

I think I posted a photo once of the engine compartment with the VW engine. I'll see if I can find that again.

The 356 roadster I posted is a very early Gmund car probably built in 1948 and on exhibit at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart.

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #53 on: February 06, 2017, 07:54:36 PM »

The 356 roadster I posted is a very early Gmund car probably built in 1948 and on exhibit at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart.
Ah, then it is earlier than mine by a few years.
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bassman51

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #54 on: February 06, 2017, 08:12:07 PM »

Back on topic ... I've lent gear to friends, both expecting to get it back (which I did) and not expecting to (which went as planned).   It feels good to help people.   

And I'm still pretty happy with my 997.  But the new 991 looks really sweet.   You think GASsing over a camera gets expensive?
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Life is what happens when you're busy making other plans.

HSakols

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #55 on: February 06, 2017, 09:21:50 PM »

I've loaned my gear to two professional photographers in my area and a couple of very good friends.  Thanks to one of those photographers, I was given the opportunity to buy a home in Yosemite (El Portal).  I remember lending him a lens which was promptly returned - no problem.  The second professional wanted to compare my Nikon lenses.  I was given some nice test charts that showed my beloved Nikon 24-70 wasn't the sharpest tool in my bag.
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Rob C

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Re: Do you share your gear when around other photographers?
« Reply #56 on: February 08, 2017, 04:33:30 AM »

I've loaned my gear to two professional photographers in my area and a couple of very good friends.  Thanks to one of those photographers, I was given the opportunity to buy a home in Yosemite (El Portal).  I remember lending him a lens which was promptly returned - no problem.  The second professional wanted to compare my Nikon lenses.  I was given some nice test charts that showed my beloved Nikon 24-70 wasn't the sharpest tool in my bag.


You see? Instead of running those lending risks, all you had to do was believe my oft-voiced gripe about my own, brand new Nikkor 24-70 which went straight back after the first test. It was my first - and last - zoom.

That Russ also owns the same type of lens and that it performs nicely is not a contradiction: it's proof of yet another belief of mine: we, the buyers, are now the unpaid Final Inspection departments for these companies.

Listen to Granddad; he doesn't fib to you, why would he?

Rob C

P.S.  Why did you want to buy a home built on top of a bomb?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 04:43:14 AM by Rob C »
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