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Author Topic: Leica M10 Review  (Read 4082 times)

KLaban

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2017, 04:51:51 PM »

Is the sensor on the M10 different than the sensor on the Leica M (Typ 262) ?

I believe so.
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algrove

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2017, 10:02:40 AM »

Never mind. It should great terrific with that old 40 Summicron you still have. Ditch the old SL.
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Manoli

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2017, 10:12:20 AM »

Is the sensor on the M10 different than the sensor on the Leica M (Typ 262) ?

It's new. A Maestro processor allied to a new sensor specifically designed for the M10 - not the same as the 24MP one in the Leica Q or SL.
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alainbriot

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2017, 10:17:43 AM »

It's new. A Maestro processor allied to a new sensor specifically designed for the M10 - not the same as the 24MP one in the Leica Q or SL.

Thank you that answers my question.  I think Kevin does mention that the sensor is new in his review.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2017, 10:20:47 AM by alainbriot »
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Alain Briot
Author of Mastering Landscape Photography, Mastering Composition, Creativity and Personal Style., Marketing Fine Art Photography and How Photographs are Sold.
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alainbriot

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2017, 10:21:35 AM »

Never mind. It should great terrific with that old 40 Summicron you still have. Ditch the old SL.

I still have it.  I also have a 35mm Summicron F2 still mounted on an M7.  Time to get a digital M to use it again :-)
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Alain Briot
Author of Mastering Landscape Photography, Mastering Composition, Creativity and Personal Style., Marketing Fine Art Photography and How Photographs are Sold.
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donbga

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2017, 11:03:03 AM »


Anyway, that afternoon, the doorbell rang and I opened it to a guy in a suit, who turned out to be head of sales at the distributors. He offered to deliver the car, if I'd reconsider, the following day. I was not wearing a suit myself, in fact I was wearing a sarong and not even a T-shirt. I felt a little bit undermined by my sartorial choice for the postprandial period, and so felt I had no option but to accept his offer. Oh well, I wanted that car anyway...

Rob

Sounds like in the end you liked the purchasing experience discovering it didn't suck, reminiscent of this:

That didn't suck!

Don Bryant
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BAB

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2017, 02:01:20 PM »

It might be worth a wait before jumping into the new M11 because Leica is most likely going to release more new products shortly...I have no knowledge of specific models but new products are confirmed for 2017.
I recently just disposed of all my M gear I was on board with the M system since the M8 and before that with the film versions. The cameras and lenses are workable especially the M240 with new tricked out software, image quality more the look of the file is hard to beat or get use to the look of other manufactures files compared to the Leica ones. BUT personally I got fed up with the rangefinder, so now after years of squinting they release a bigger finder BRAVO a step in the correct direction. Try using live view without a tilting screen in the street, try using the EVF on the M240 to obtain focus at 2M when someone is walking towards you. If the M shot at 10 FPS you could have a better chance. That's just my opinion.
I would rebuy a small footprint system from Leica when some of my MUST HAVE needs are met.
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I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times - "Bruce Lee"

Rob C

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2017, 03:44:07 PM »

You sound like my wife!

;-)

I don't think you checked that before you posted... ? AFAIK we are talking about two of them, not three. Please tell me I'm not mistaken.

;-)

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2017, 04:08:14 PM »

Sounds like in the end you liked the purchasing experience discovering it didn't suck, reminiscent of this:

That didn't suck!

Don Bryant


Well, I was convinced it didn't suck before I order it - Ford Escort XRi - it was just that I objected to getting effed about because I was one customer (repeat one) disappointed (after a promise of delivery date) and dumped at the back of the queue [ŕ la Obama concept :-) ] because I wasn't buying a fleet of them that week... However, it turned out to be a very different thing to the predecessor, the XR3i, which was fun to use (except for heavy parking) whereas the XRi turned out to be very much softer, but faster in a straight line. Very tail-happy on narrow, wet roads. However, from that one to the current Fiesta, they have become ever more difficult to park, especially if you have to do it alongside a kerb by reversing into a short gap between cars: the shape of the rear side window rises and you lose all sense of location. I miss the 70s cars where you always knew where the corners were!

But it gave me some happy years, and as with the one before it, I felt quite sad to see it go. But after twelve or thirteen years, and a lot of money going on repainting bits of it for the final four yaers or so...

I enjoyed that video; looked like a lot of fun to make. Thank you for the link.

Rob C

algrove

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2017, 06:47:50 PM »

I still have it.  I also have a 35mm Summicron F2 still mounted on an M7.  Time to get a digital M to use it again :-)
Alain
If you end up with a digital M, it might be worth sending your existing lenses off to DAG who can 6 bit code them for lens corrections, etc. in the M10 and CLA and adjust them for digital needs.
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alainbriot

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2017, 08:03:30 PM »

Alain
If you end up with a digital M, it might be worth sending your existing lenses off to DAG who can 6 bit code them for lens corrections, etc. in the M10 and CLA and adjust them for digital needs.

Thanks for the tip.  I'll keep it in mind.
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Alain Briot
Author of Mastering Landscape Photography, Mastering Composition, Creativity and Personal Style., Marketing Fine Art Photography and How Photographs are Sold.
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ndevlin

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #31 on: January 27, 2017, 05:55:17 PM »

despite their antiquated nature and eye-watering prices they give me more joy than any other camera I've ever owned.

This.
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alainbriot

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2017, 03:37:25 PM »

There's actually a lot of value in having an efficient manual focus camera such as the Leica. Right now for such situations I use a Fuji X100s and in low light, indoors or at night events, autofocus doesn't have enough contrast or light to focus quickly, if at all, and the alternate manual focus option just isn't practical.  Leica manual focusing on the other hand is quick and effective.
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Alain Briot
Author of Mastering Landscape Photography, Mastering Composition, Creativity and Personal Style., Marketing Fine Art Photography and How Photographs are Sold.
http://www.beautiful-landscape.com

airfang

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2017, 03:53:26 AM »

There's actually a lot of value in having an efficient manual focus camera such as the Leica. Right now for such situations I use a Fuji X100s and in low light, indoors or at night events, autofocus doesn't have enough contrast or light to focus quickly, if at all, and the alternate manual focus option just isn't practical.  Leica manual focusing on the other hand is quick and effective.

In those situations usually it is quite hard to focus via the rangefinder as well.
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Rob C

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2017, 04:19:16 AM »

Can't say I remember any focussing problems with af and low light with either my D200 or D700. Where I have found difficulty with af is in fairly normal daylight, when I'm trying to decide between which part of an image I want sharp in situations where there are lots of reflections, like shooting into a shop window. In a case such a that, only the human mind can call the shot and decide which level of the image is important. So yes, manual focus still has an important rôle to play, but I don't have the current experience to know how well a Leica focussing system tackles that sort of situation, which is not an everyday one.

What it does imply, though, is that a proper slr screen for manual focussing is long overdue in digital cameras! I am led to believe that af is not read off the viewing screen anyway, but from a smaller, sub-mirror in the box. If so, then why would the texture of the main screen have to be compromised as it is?

Rob

KLaban

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #35 on: January 29, 2017, 05:43:25 AM »

Can't say I remember any focussing problems with af and low light with either my D200 or D700. Where I have found difficulty with af is in fairly normal daylight, when I'm trying to decide between which part of an image I want sharp in situations where there are lots of reflections, like shooting into a shop window. In a case such a that, only the human mind can call the shot and decide which level of the image is important. So yes, manual focus still has an important rôle to play, but I don't have the current experience to know how well a Leica focussing system tackles that sort of situation, which is not an everyday one.

What it does imply, though, is that a proper slr screen for manual focussing is long overdue in digital cameras! I am led to believe that af is not read off the viewing screen anyway, but from a smaller, sub-mirror in the box. If so, then why would the texture of the main screen have to be compromised as it is?

Rob

I can only say that in this situation I would have been lost without the rangefinder patch. Try as I might other methods simply weren't up to the task. The EVF whether used as one would use an SLR screen or in combination with magnification and or focus peaking failed miserably. Who'd have thought that an antiquated rangefinder patch would have succeeded when all else failed, well, for me at least?

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Rob C

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2017, 09:41:22 AM »

Keith,

Ah, but: in that image you are working at what appears to be a well stopped-down aperture which hides a multitude of focussing mistakes.

I have been tending to work either wide open or about a stop down at best; not that it's any better a way or not, just that I need to differentiate planes for what I'm trying to achieve these days. So due to that, which as you know means pretty much WYS(on the screen)IWYG because af on a dslr works at wide open - as does manual focussing unless you want to stop down to the working aperture just to check - which on tiny cameras screens ain't that brilliant either (no, not going to cry over the number 500 right now!), I found that using manual in those situations was often the best way open to me (not counting the eye probems that have hit me). However, a glitch still remains because a 50mm at f2 or f1.8 on 135 format cameras, used at the distance it has to be in order to cover an area of what - six feet-wide window fame? is going to have too much DOF for my intention, especially when the reflected plane I want crisp is of something perhaps a few feet behind me... I need a super-fast which I ain't got!

I wonder how a rangefinder mechanism works out what you want (in the case of both our intentions with these sorts of confused images); at best, I'd imagine it to have exactly the same decisions to make as any other system, with the same problem of knowing what's key.

But as I've indicated before, the last time I touched a Leica rangefinder camera was '65 when my last boss had one (and the only other Leica I've held was an R6 many years later), and so I'm not at all qualified to comment on how a current Leica M might handle in reality.

Rob

KLaban

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2017, 10:41:56 AM »

Rob, the rangefinder or any other focussing system can't possibly know what we want and makes no decisions whatsoever. That comes down to the mug behind the camera.

Wide open or stopped down I find the rangefinder to be the quickest and easiest way to manual focus. Of course the most accurate way to focus wide open or stopped down would be off the sensor using liveview via the LCD or EVF but that's another story.

Given the choice my preference would always be manual focus. Fact is I was having increasing problems focusing with an SLR. back, forth, back forth, back forth...the more I tried the worse it got and that was using the best viewfinder in the buisiness. It's a problem I don't have with a rangefinder regardless of aperture.
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KLaban

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2017, 11:59:16 AM »

Rob, I should add, this is of course just idle chat, if you really want to know if an M would suit then perhaps a trip to Barcelona would answer your questions and provide more of those shop window shots than you could shake a stick at.

There again, perhaps it's just safer not to know.

;-)
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Rob C

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Re: Leica M10 Review
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2017, 02:12:08 PM »

Rob, I should add, this is of course just idle chat, if you really want to know if an M would suit then perhaps a trip to Barcelona would answer your questions and provide more of those shop window shots than you could shake a stick at.

There again, perhaps it's just safer not to know.

;-)


Too true!

;-)

Rob
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