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Author Topic: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?  (Read 1146 times)

bill t.

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1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« on: January 14, 2017, 05:28:26 PM »

I'm looking for a super bright Android (or even Apple) tablet to use outdoors with a DJI drone system, which feeds the screen through a USB connection.  I sometimes need to accommodate 2 or 3 people at once, and a tight monitor hood is just too intimate for people I scarcely know.  I'm thinking I could benefit from at least 1000 nits which would reduce the shading requirement to a macho black t-shirt, a scrim on a c-stand, and maybe a black Gatorfoam sheet behind the tablet.  My best current option is a 400 nit cellphone and that isn't bright enough in most cases.

Can't use goggles.  Did you ever try to talk to somebody wearing monitor goggles?  It's unnerving.  And it requires you to have a dedicated aircraft watching assistant.
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Peter McLennan

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Re: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 05:34:54 PM »

The new DJI Phantom 4 Pro + dedicated screen claims 1000 nit brightness.  Perhaps you could find their source.
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Don Blauvelt

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Re: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 05:24:31 PM »

I recently looked into this product for a slightly different reason,
smallHD has a 7" 1920 x 1080 screen, 1000nits with an anti-refective coating. It's a "702 Bright Full HD Field Monitor".
It is more expensive than a tablet, but...

However you solve the issue, please post.

Don
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bill t.

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Re: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2017, 01:18:06 AM »

Thanks Peter and Don.

Decided to punt on this one.  I found a clean Samsung J7 "super amoled" phone for $80 on Craigslist.  It's almost 500 nits and just bright enough. There's a Samsung app that allows nearby, wireless screen sharing which I will be testing in a few days.  I'm told it works well with the DJI software running.  So if it actually does, I can give everybody who matters their very own personal monitor.

Of course there are Atomos-like recorders out there with 2000 nit screens, and DJI has one on the way that will "seamlessly integrate" with their video data stream.

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Pete Berry

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Re: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2017, 12:26:22 PM »

My several year old Asus tf700t 10" android tablet has a phenomenal FHD display of 600 nits max brightness I frequently use outdoors with it's Panasonic wi-fi utility for remote use with my GH4, and occasionally for public viewing of Monterey seashore life with a long tele.
From PC Mag's review of several years ago:

"The marquee feature here is the 10.1-inch 1,920-by-1,200-pixel IPS+ display, and it doesn't disappoint. It's not quite as densely packed as the 2,048-by-1,536-pixel Retina display, but the 224 pixels per inch is fairly close to the iPad's 264 pixels per inch. You likely won't notice the difference at normal viewing distances. The display itself is covered by Corning's new Gorilla Glass 2, which is thinner than the original and supposedly offers better touch responsiveness, but I didn't notice any difference. Much like the Transformer Prime TF201, the Infinity TF700 has a Super IPS+ mode that jacks the brightness up to 600 nits. Apple doesn't list an exact brightness for its displays, but the TF700 is much brighter than the iPad—so much so that I found myself checking to make sure the iPad was in fact set at max brightness. Viewing angle is solid and colors look pleasantly saturated in both normal and Super IPS+ modes."
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bcooter

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Re: 1000+ nit tablet for outdoor monitor use?
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2017, 03:34:23 PM »

I've used mobile devices to review still imagery and motion footage and they're fine for a group that wants to be involved, though I usually find them laying around the set (interior or exterior) after about an hour.

You probably don't want to go this way, but unless you have a DIT on set then checking footage is vital.

I don't know what you shoot, or what you expect, but from experience I've learned to always have at minimum a laptop that has a calibration in it that will closely match my editorial timeline and viewer.

First thing we do after setup and prelight is to shoot a test, usually panning into areas that are slightly off set, drop them into resolve (which has a beautiful color engine) and give it a quick check.

I know on a lot of projects time is of the essence and there is not enough of it to run through a ten minute take, so we watch 4 seconds, move the cursor across, then check 4 seconds so on and so on.

Our minimum setup has a good screen and the laptop mounts on a medium sized tripod with a small shotbag for stability.   If there is time and space we also run a medium sized broadcast field monitor as that is the best way to check, but sometimes the broadcast monitor is not an option.

To save battery power of the computer all our laotops have two ssd 1 terabyte drives so the moment we check the footage we turn them off if they isn't additional power available.   SSDs start so fast, very little time is lost and battery power is saved.

We also set our on camera evf's to match as closely as possible to the computer. 

 I can't tell you the number of times we've caught something on the computer with just a few moments of review and nothing is worse than a beautiful take and all of a sudden something bright enters the scene and blows the detail.

But everyone works differently, though ask any DP how many times the DIT comes out of his tent and say to the DP, we've got a problem with __________.   

I'm not saying a tablet or phone won't suffice, but the closer I get to the system I'm working in, the easier it is to grade later and sometimes can save a shot, maybe a whole scene.

IMO

BC

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