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Author Topic: Crea**vity  (Read 4254 times)

GrahamBy

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2017, 02:47:41 PM »


Shit! Does that mean that your "Rob C" button will become of the past, too?


You just have to enable it from the "other buttons" sub-menu of the "custom settings" tab of the "creativity parameters" screen.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2017, 03:36:50 PM »

You just have to enable it from the "other buttons" sub-menu of the "custom settings" tab of the "creativity parameters" screen.
I thought that worked only on APS-Rob-C sensor cameras.
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http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

Rob C

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2017, 03:58:37 PM »

I thought that worked only on APS-Rob-C sensor cameras.


No, no, it's only been licensed to FF formats! This is serious stuff - no low riders (however cute the paint jobs) allowed. I never did have faith in four-wheeled tripods. Just ain't natural.

Rob C

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2017, 06:49:01 PM »

I never did have faith in four-wheeled tripods. Just ain't natural.

Rob C
A friend of mine once had a Land Rover which he referred to as his "camera case."
His camera at the time was an 11x14" Deardorff.  Four-wheeled tripod might have been a better name for it.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

visualizer

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2017, 02:08:33 AM »

Haven't figures out how to box quotes yet...so...
From Rob C
"do what comes into your head"
The question is how did that "what" get
into your head? Is it a result of viewing
millions of photographs and trying to recreate the
ones that our head liked? This is really one of the
BIG questions. Philosophers like E. H. Gombrich have
presented a new epistomolgy on how we "know what
we know" and how we see it. When you push a creativity
button, who's vision are you copying? The computer
programmer who liked Weston,  Adams, or Arbus?
Likely not. It's probably a programmer who looked at
a survey of the popularity of images. We don't need
another bikini clad model pulling her hair out the water
in an arc.  We've all lived unique lives, show what moves
YOU, in your image, using your artistic  talent to let others see it.
John M R
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Rob C

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2017, 04:33:23 AM »

Haven't figures out how to box quotes yet...so...
From Rob C
"do what comes into your head"
The question is how did that "what" get
into your head? Is it a result of viewing
millions of photographs and trying to recreate the
ones that our head liked? This is really one of the
BIG questions. Philosophers like E. H. Gombrich have
presented a new epistomolgy on how we "know what
we know" and how we see it. When you push a creativity
button, who's vision are you copying? The computer
programmer who liked Weston,  Adams, or Arbus?
Likely not. It's probably a programmer who looked at
a survey of the popularity of images. We don't need
another bikini clad model pulling her hair out the water
in an arc.  We've all lived unique lives, show what moves
YOU, in your image, using your artistic  talent to let others see it.
John M R

You're too modern: when I started to think of photography there were no programmers of whom I know; it was back in the late 40s and early 50s that photography stuck in my mind, and then it was driven more by cameras, because I used to see ads for Leica, Nikon, Canon etc. in American magazines and the objects were so pretty; they epitomised all that seemed to look good, attractive and bear the promise of tickets to a never-never land just beyond the purchase (of which I had no way of making). So advertising worked.

I did have a plastic Brownie Reflex somewhere around '52...

So that's one genesis of photographic interest. But interest in what as image, which is where your question leads or perhaps from whence it comes, is something else.

As I've said repeatedly, that is decision based on recognition of self. For me, back in the pre-digtal era, it came from the discovery of my aunt's collection of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar magazines. I must have been about sixteen. Finding such amazingly beautiful pictures of women coincided with an enormous interest in the women themselves, and the added lure of sophistication was unbearable: it screamed to be absorbed. I didn't see women looking like that on the bus to school. I suppose it's what gave me the feeling of women on pedestals, where I've tried to put them the rest of my life. Frankly, I think it's what all people of some artistic bent have been doing, even the perverted ones who just see the pedestals as upside down.

You might say that okay, I'm just playing semantic games, that though were no programmers there were editors - filters to vison, if you like, so that's possibly the source of images for you. Almost, but true only in part: there were all sorts of magazines too, with all sorts of editors, so it wasn't as absolutely externally influenced a grounding as it might seem, because from that plethora of choice one was still obliged to select genre, and that choice could only be made via personal recognition. Even withing genre the choices are so vast: somebody in love with Sarah Moon couldn't envisage any love for either of the Richardson exponents. At least, this writer could never so do, amd its personality of which we speak.

To sum it up: you discover what you like, and your options are usually to go and produce something in the same general direction, or simply to hang about and wait until something happens that you see in time to catch. For the amateur, the luxury of time lets you follow the latter path but if you are a pro, you have to go out there and make something happen in as short a space of time as you can: your client has to pay for you, your models etc. etc. so hanging about and running up the hours awaiting the muse is seldom the open option.

Some declare that the only true art is the new. Maybe they mean that the only true gimmick is the new.

Rob C
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 04:39:30 AM by Rob C »
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N80

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2017, 03:32:10 PM »

Some declare that the only true art is the new. Maybe they mean that the only true gimmick is the new.

Rob C

Yes. Sadly, most of what passes as modern (as in now) art was modern about 50 years ago. Once art without meaning becomes popular, where can you go from there?
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George

"What is truth?" Pontius  Pilate

Rob C

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2017, 05:02:07 PM »

Yes. Sadly, most of what passes as modern (as in now) art was modern about 50 years ago. Once art without meaning becomes popular, where can you go from there?


I can't say I'd ever thought of it quite like that, but now that you've mentioned it, it seems so obvious!

Of course, when anything and everything's ok, where do you begin to evaluate, can you begin to evaluate anymore? Now, I have a brand new headache.

There's an echo of that in my own state of photographic play right now. My interest in the reflections-in-windows theme is strong, should be infinite in its scope, yet I am already a bit bored by it. I hope that's just a reflection (sigh) of the fact that I don't have easy access to a city, and have inevitably run out of options in my two villages/tiny towns, depending on whom one speaks with - some get easily offended.

Of course, it could be my own limitations instead: Saul Leiter seemed to find enough material within his own neighbourhood to last much of a lifetime, but a village in Spain ain't New York!

;-)

Rob C

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2017, 10:01:45 AM »

"Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed. The created item may be intangible (such as an idea, a scientific theory, a musical composition, or a joke) or a physical object (such as an invention, a literary work, or a painting)."

So I suppose all human beings are creative by definition.

N80

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #29 on: February 15, 2017, 02:41:04 PM »

"Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed. The created item may be intangible (such as an idea, a scientific theory, a musical composition, or a joke) or a physical object (such as an invention, a literary work, or a painting)."

So I suppose all human beings are creative by definition.

Sure. But that is a matter of degree. One might add a little more cheddar to the family macaroni and cheese recipe while another might compose Beethoven's Ninth or write Don Quixote.
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George

"What is truth?" Pontius  Pilate

Otto Phocus

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2017, 06:45:54 AM »

"Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something new and somehow valuable is formed. The created item may be intangible (such as an idea, a scientific theory, a musical composition, or a joke) or a physical object (such as an invention, a literary work, or a painting)."


You put this in quotes but did not list a source.  It would be interesting for the author of this statement to demonstrate why being "somewhat valuable" has anything to do with creativity.

If value is subjective this leads to one inferring that something can be both creative (to one person) and not creative (to another person) at the same time and that does not make sense unless your name is Schrodinger  ;D

Creativity should not be dependent on value. 

Certainly the creative photographs I take have no value to anyone.
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GrahamBy

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2017, 06:54:26 AM »

Certainly the creative photographs I take have no value to anyone.

Except to you!

So long as value is not restricted to monetary value, it seems ok to me as a definition.
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Otto Phocus

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2017, 10:00:16 AM »

Except to you!

So long as value is not restricted to monetary value, it seems ok to me as a definition.

Often not even valuable to me.   ;D 

It would be interesting to find out how the original author defined value in that context.
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BobDavid

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #33 on: February 20, 2017, 02:09:11 PM »

As a kid, I noticed subtle details in conversations and scenery.  Lucky for me, I got into photography and writing during my formative years. Making stuff is a better alternative than not making stuff. Learning a craft is a lifetime effort.
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Telecaster

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Re: Crea**vity
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2017, 05:10:41 PM »

As a kid, I noticed subtle details in conversations and scenery.  Lucky for me, I got into photography and writing during my formative years. Making stuff is a better alternative than not making stuff. Learning a craft is a lifetime effort.

IMO this about covers it.

-Dave-
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