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Author Topic: Is a FF DSLR sensor enough for large Gallery Prints?  (Read 6156 times)

Hans Kruse

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Re: Is a FF DSLR sensor enough for large Gallery Prints?
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2017, 03:39:19 PM »

Thank you guys for posting.
I am trying to find someone who has shot Canon 5ds at 50MP and compared the quality with Hasselblad 50MP back or Phase One 50MP back.
Anyone knows of a review out there?

Thank you
Rafal

I had the Phase One IQ160 on loan for a year in 2012-13 and I'm now shooting the 5DSR (and Nikon D810). The resolution is very close at a fraction of the cost. Try it out via a loan. For shooting landscapes I find the 5DSR a lot more versatile with very good zoom lenses from 11mm to 400mm. Nobody will see the difference in your final work.

GrahamBy

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Re: Is a FF DSLR sensor enough for large Gallery Prints?
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2017, 09:13:27 AM »

True, the message is more important to get people to walk over, but if they do walk over and find it lacking they usually walk away. Film grain being visible is more acceptable than square pixels. Probably because they were a bit random and "artistic".

Yes, that's why people find prints of photos by Cartier-Bresson, Burri, Capa, Sieff, and Newton so boring.

BTW, where do I find a printer that makes square pixels?
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Camerajim

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Re: Is a FF DSLR sensor enough for large Gallery Prints?
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2017, 11:42:08 AM »

it is probably heresy to say this on LuLu, but detail is rarely art. It is craft.

Seurat's A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, which is approximately 7x10 feet, is an astounding piece of art, with a tremendous impact as you stand before it. The resolution is approximately 25 dpi (the whole piece has been estimated at 6mp).

Yes, I know. It's not the same. But the art come first. Fine detail usually only plays a supporting role. However, if your art is about the veins in the leaves and not about the trees or the forest, then go for the details.
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