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Author Topic: Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)  (Read 1801 times)

emreguclu

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Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)
« on: November 28, 2016, 02:44:44 AM »

Hello Everyone,

I am moving towards the IR photorography. I will be using sony alpha mirrorless line and need input on the following concerns.

  • Full spectrum vs Conversion: What is the drawback of using full scpectrum, what are real image quality differences? It sems a great option to be able to use different spectrums for the right purposes.
  • Stacking Filters: Is it possible to use a more visable spectrum conversion but then use a 830 in front of the lense? Is there any loss in exposure in this scenario? And any thoughts on comoaring this type of setup with the full spectrum one in terms of image quality?

Thanks a lot for your comments,
Emre
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Telecaster

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Re: Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2016, 04:40:20 PM »

From my POV the main drawback with a full-spectrum conversion is that you'll always be using a filter of some sort. I had a full-spectrum Fuji bridge cam for awhile about a decade ago, and found shooting with no filter to result in soft-ish images with muddy tonality. I don't recommend sans-filter pic taking if you're considering that as an option. On the plus side full spectrum lets you use the same camera (with appropriate filters) for visible-spectrum, IR with various cutoff frequencies and even (with some sensors anyway) UV photography.

You can certainly go for a shorter wavelength cutoff with your conversion too, like 720nm, and then use lens filters that cut at longer wavelengths below that for a stronger IR effect. I don't know of any problems in doing this other than the usual potential stuff associated with putting more glass surfaces between your subject and your sensor.

-Dave- (edit: removed double signature)
« Last Edit: November 29, 2016, 04:24:50 PM by Telecaster »
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emreguclu

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Re: Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2016, 06:19:52 PM »

From my POV the main drawback with a full-spectrum conversion is that you'll always be using a filter of some sort. I had a full-spectrum Fuji bridge cam for awhile about a decade ago, and found shooting with no filter to result in soft-ish images with muddy tonality. I don't recommend sans-filter pic taking if you're considering that as an option. On the plus side full spectrum lets you use the same camera (with appropriate filters) for visible-spectrum, IR with various cutoff frequencies and even (with some sensors anyway) UV photography.

You can certainly go for a shorter wavelength cutoff with your conversion too, like 720nm, and then use lens filters that cut at longer wavelengths below that for a stronger IR effect. I don't know of any problems in doing this other than the usual potential stuff associated with putting more glass surfaces between your subject and your sensor.

-Dave- (edit: removed double signature)

Thank you very much Dave! Much appreciated.
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vrkaya

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Re: Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2016, 06:28:27 AM »

I went with Full Spectrum on my Mark II and purchased Visible Spectrum and IR590 filters. I like the option to shoot either and absolutely love IR shooting now.
Ron
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David S

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Re: Full Spectrum vs Conversion (stacking filters)
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2016, 10:41:00 AM »

I went deep IR on my Fuji XE-1 and am very pleased.

Dave S
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