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Author Topic: Small backpacking tripod  (Read 46040 times)

armand

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Small backpacking tripod
« on: October 27, 2016, 09:19:26 AM »

As the title suggests, I'm looking for a small backpacking tripod.

The lighter one that I'm using currently is a Sirui T-005, the older version where you cannot remove the center column. It's almost 2lbs and in my last trip I used only for 2 group shots so practically I carried it for nothing in an overloaded backpack already. I could have found an use in the evening but it was too windy.

I keep thinking to get the newest version, remove the center column and 2-3 segments but I'm not sure it will work. A Manfrotto Daytrip looks good but it's way too heavy, I want something under 1lbs including the ballhead, able to support at least a Fuji X-T2 with a larger lens, if not a Nikon D750 with a 24-120 like lens.

With the above criteria it looks like only a table tripod like will fit the bill. Any suggestions? I can use the ballhead from the Sirui, roughly 1/2 lbs. An FLM CP10-A1 or a Feisol TT-15 mark 2 are among the candidates, not sure they are easily adaptable to trickier terrain (as in not flat)

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2016, 09:40:56 AM »

A sometimes use a Manfrotto table tripod I got a few years back, with a small ball head. I use it when I need to hike really light. The following pic was shot on the top of Pico Mtn. (highest mountain in Portugal, Azores). It is a night shot, 8 minute exposure, on a Sony Alpha 7 and with a Batis 25 lens.

On other occasions, I carry an old Gitzo series 0 tripod without centre column. It depends on the kind of trip.

SZRitter

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2016, 09:50:34 AM »

Not sure your criteria, but I've been happy with the Benro Travel Angel series. There should be Carbon Fiber ones out there.

Also, what about one of those bean bags with the tripod mount on top? I have one of those and they are great, if you are using a smaller camera and have something to set it on.
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armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2016, 10:15:09 AM »

Not sure your criteria, but I've been happy with the Benro Travel Angel series. There should be Carbon Fiber ones out there.

Also, what about one of those bean bags with the tripod mount on top? I have one of those and they are great, if you are using a smaller camera and have something to set it on.

It's in the text: under 1 lbs in weight, support at least an APS-C mirrorless camera, accommodate various terrains.

brianrybolt

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2016, 10:23:49 AM »

Gorillapod.  The large one is robust and light weight.  Can be put almost anywhere.
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SZRitter

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2016, 10:29:10 AM »

It's in the text: under 1 lbs in weight, support at least an APS-C mirrorless camera, accommodate various terrains.

And this is called lazy people don't read :-P
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armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2016, 10:40:20 AM »

Gorillapod.  The large one is robust and light weight.  Can be put almost anywhere.

It's a good idea, I almost forgot I have the SLR version. It is 387g on my scale (13.7oz) and compact enough. The reason I rarely use it it's that it's quite clumsy, rearranging those legs can be annoying. Portrait orientation can be a nightmare and despite the fact that it's compact it used to find a way to catch something in the backpack very often, in or out.
However I will probably give it another chance in a trip where weight does matter to see if those "traits" can be more tolerable.

On a side note that FLM tripod looks better the more I look at it. Kind of expensive though.

SZRitter

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2016, 11:35:24 AM »

A bit above your weight (1.8lbs with head), but what about this one? Has two section legs and a center column you could adjust to get a bit more height flexibility.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/994911-REG/mefoto_a0320q00r_daytrip_tripod_kit.html
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armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2016, 01:24:04 PM »

A bit above your weight (1.8lbs with head), but what about this one? Has two section legs and a center column you could adjust to get a bit more height flexibility.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/994911-REG/mefoto_a0320q00r_daytrip_tripod_kit.html

I've seen it before, it looks good but it's just too heavy as it doesn't save me any weight compared to what I have now. If they would make a carbon version with no center column it would be almost perfect.

Torbjörn Tapani

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2016, 03:17:55 PM »

Gorillapod can not support a DSLR well. And absolutely not with the 24-120 attached.
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alan_b

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2016, 03:52:45 PM »

Gorillapod Focus works for me, which is heavier duty than the DSLR version.  I use a RRS BH-25 on it.
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/586957-REG/Joby_GP8_01EN_Gorillapod_Focus_Flexible.html

TonyVentourisPhotography

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2016, 04:11:25 PM »

Just saying...
How about a Platypod and assistance from the natural surroundings!  You can get this thing to stay on just about anything, including the sides of trees...

http://www.platypodpro.com/

Talk about space saving!
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armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2016, 05:08:29 PM »

Gorillapod Focus works for me, which is heavier duty than the DSLR version.  I use a RRS BH-25 on it.
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/586957-REG/Joby_GP8_01EN_Gorillapod_Focus_Flexible.html

Quite heavy according to their specs, 1.1 lbs without a head. On a second thought my Gorillapod is quite lighter than the SLR version they have on the site so unless so made it tougher and heavier (or their specs are wrong) I probably have a lighter variant. I could have sworn it's the SLR version ...

Just saying...
How about a Platypod and assistance from the natural surroundings!  You can get this thing to stay on just about anything, including the sides of trees...

http://www.platypodpro.com/

Talk about space saving!

Interesting. You do need a flatish surface to start with but it could work.

armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2016, 05:27:19 PM »

NancyP

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2016, 07:36:00 PM »

What height do you need?
The Feisol TT-15 looks good for a table top pod or ground pod, as long as your ground is pretty level - there's no way to adjust leg length to compensate for uneven ground.  Much as I love Feisol products, I would prefer a 2 leg section or continuously variable angle one-section ground-pod for outdoors.
Other possibilities with 2 leg sections: PakPod adventure tripod at 15.5 oz, 1.5 to 17.75" height. Berlebach 50031 wooden mini-pod 1.3 pounds. The PakPod looks weird, but functional. Of course the problem with these two pods is that you may wish to add a ball head at a minimum of 8 extra oz. for a decent head that can handle more than just a small speedlight.
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NancyP

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2016, 01:46:37 PM »

Do you use hiking poles, and are you hiking with someone else who has poles? There are a few DIY projects out there for making a temporary tripod out of 3 hiking poles and a home-made connector with ball head platform. And some (not exactly sophisticated) hiking poles have 1/4" screw on top - Mountainsmith might make one. Why not check out backpackinglight.com fora?
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armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2016, 07:39:56 PM »

What height do you need?
...
Other possibilities with 2 leg sections: PakPod adventure tripod at 15.5 oz, 1.5 to 17.75" height. Berlebach 50031 wooden mini-pod 1.3 pounds. The PakPod looks weird, but functional. Of course the problem with these two pods is that you may wish to add a ball head at a minimum of 8 extra oz. for a decent head that can handle more than just a small speedlight.

The higher the better  :D
I plan to add the head from Sirui, it's about 1/2 lbs. The Pakpod looked good until I realized it's not that compact (or light) and while those legs can expand, it seems it requires some effort and it's not that fast to get where you want to.

armand

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2016, 10:01:46 AM »

Continuing my search I found this review (again): https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/beyond-the-table-top-5-mini-tripods-reviewed

From the comments a couple of other alternatives are the RRS TFA-01 Ultra Pod or the discontinued, very pricey, much more flexible albeit a touch heavier Gitzo GT351 (the 00 series).


I'm really tempted to get a Sirui T-025x and take away the long center column (available by design) and 2-3 segments and it might be close to 1 lbs total.

NancyP

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Re: Small backpacking tripod
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2016, 02:40:49 PM »

Re: tripod made of hiking poles: https://hikinginfinland.com/2013/10/trailpix-ultralight-tripod.html
For the home 3D printer fan: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:650943
The ZipShot shock-cord folded aluminum tripod that used to be advertised: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/660803-REG/Tamrac_TR40601_TR406_ZipShot_Compact_Ultra_Light.html


"Lord V" macro technique: hold both the camera and the pole with one hand. I have tried this and it does help.

Lord V's technique: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lordv/75900443/
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