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Author Topic: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye  (Read 4245 times)

Chris Calohan

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2016, 11:26:46 AM »

If you take offense at someone photographing your naked child, then why parade them on a public beach? There is no sense to that. Perhaps, I did overstep a social boundary but I did so with her (as I see it) implied permission. She put him out there for the whole world to see and I saw and I made the shot. There is absolutely no inference of pornography or stalking or anything on my part. I was simply reacting to her invitation.

Think of the number of people today with cell phones who take pictures of anything and everything without regard to any social mores. In today's society it is far more that we go with a new adage of "if you don't want your public space to be everybody's public place, do it behind closed doors." Building cameras, dash cameras, drones, you name it they're all out there and they are often recording you without any forethought to your sense of privacy. I  did not invade anyone's privacy, I only recorded their public actions on a public beach.

Oh, and I sent it to my attorney prior to posting it on this forum and she said no problem. I can be a silly boy on occasion, but mama Calohan raised no stupid children.
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Otto Phocus

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2016, 12:42:46 PM »

Perhaps some people feel there is a difference between being able to see something with the human eye and making a permanent record with it using a camera?

Photographers seem to presume that if someone is OK with being seen, they are automatically OK with being photographed. I don't think they should be considered the same.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2016, 01:05:45 PM »

Perhaps some people feel there is a difference between being able to see something with the human eye and making a permanent record with it using a camera?

Photographers seem to presume that if someone is OK with being seen, they are automatically OK with being photographed. I don't think they should be considered the same.

Interesting point.

My view is that they should be considered the same. If you are in public, you are a fair game (in most cases at least).

But I see your point and would like that you or someone else who shares your view elaborate it a bit further. Why? What's the difference? Genuine questions,     not trolling.

Rob C

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #23 on: October 13, 2016, 02:20:33 PM »

That's easy, Slobodan: what happens on a beach, as in this ma/kid situation, should that be the relationship, is suited to the location; making a snap and putting it out to the world is hardly the same thing. If I felt the shot had to be run under the nose of a legal eagle, then that would tell me enough not to bother posting it or, better, making the shot.

As I've written before, there are some areas of photography best left undone, and anything to do with kids is, for me, very much one of those to leave well alone. Like most Dad's with a photography obsession, I have photographs of my daughter's first bath etc. etc. which was a normal thing to do within familes in those gentler years. But, I wouldn't dream of posting them in public. No way.

As I also wrote before, I do not cast any aspersions as to photographer motivation in this case, just that I think the concept is a mistake in this day and age. I wish it were not so, but the prevalance of lunatics out there makes it essential to guard our young in every way.

Telecaster

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2016, 04:19:42 PM »

My own approach to this is to stay away from posting or displaying anything that could be used as creep fodder. I do think PC behavior often goes over the top, but OTOH it often begins as a reaction to something genuinely concerning. That our reactions are poorly calibrated to the level of the "offense" is just a consequence of us being largely emotion-led creatures.

PC is nothing new. Consider Victorian England. Or Prohibition-era America. In both cases lots of shorts in lots of knots…but over somewhat different aspects of human behavior then than now. In the future it'll be something else yet again.

I like Chris' photo but agree with the comment that it would work better with full-length shadows.

-Dave-
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RSL

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2016, 04:31:46 PM »

PC is nothing new. Consider Victorian England. Or Prohibition-era America. In both cases lots of shorts in lots of knots…but over somewhat different aspects of human behavior then than now. In the future it'll be something else yet again.

The whole thing cycles back and forth. Before you consider Victorian England, consider Elizabethan England. The crap is building at such a rate in the US at the moment that if we can avoid being brought down in a nuclear war eventually people will start rebelling against what's going on and things will start swinging back the other way. Looks to me, from 86 years on, as if things already are headed that way.

BartvanderWolf

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2016, 08:10:49 PM »

As a US society, we are still rather puritanical about some things.  It is part of our culture.

No it isn't (think playboy, playgirl, hustler, etc., etc.), it is oversensitivity to normal human behavior due to ...

Now that's the issue, why the oversensitivity/hierocracy???

I'm not advocating loose moral, but e.g. criminalizing all parents from taking pictures of their children, get real.

Cheers,
Bart
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Rob C

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2016, 04:14:07 AM »

No it isn't (think playboy, playgirl, hustler, etc., etc.), it is oversensitivity to normal human behavior due to ...

Now that's the issue, why the oversensitivity/hierocracy???

I'm not advocating loose moral, but e.g. criminalizing all parents from taking pictures of their children, get real.

Cheers,
Bart


Where is that happening? If it's true, it will be the end of camera sales!

;-)

Rob

Otto Phocus

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2016, 07:30:38 AM »

Interesting point.

My view is that they should be considered the same. If you are in public, you are a fair game (in most cases at least).

But I see your point and would like that you or someone else who shares your view elaborate it a bit further. Why? What's the difference? Genuine questions,     not trolling.

I don't want to divert/hijack this thread away from its original subject.  I have taken the liberty of starting a new thread for this discussing the issue I brought up.

My new thread is "Is seeing someone in public the same as photographing a person in public?"
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Sharon VL

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Re: Under a Mother's Watchful Eye
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2016, 02:36:12 PM »

Hi, since you asked specifically for critiques, I'll give mine, fwiw. I like the subjects and processing, very well done. I don't like the camera angle and only seeing their backs. To me, with the shadows, rather than evoking a watchful eye, it feels rather oppressive, as if the camera is from bird of prey's point-of-view.

I'm avoiding all the issues of taking photos of someone else's naked child and just sticking to what I like/don't like about the photo.

Sharon
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