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Author Topic: Half Stoned  (Read 798 times)

Arlen

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Half Stoned
« on: September 27, 2016, 07:36:21 PM »

The Cascades Stonefly is virtually unknown, even to ardent anglers. Once abundant during the last ice age, it is now restricted to high elevation rivers and streams of the Pacific Northwest. It is the primary food source of the few remaining Fur-Bearing Trout, probably the rarest of all known fish.


     


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biker

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2016, 02:11:10 PM »

Fur-bearing trout...? ;D
Great macro anyways!
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Amateur photographer who loves landscape and panoramas.

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2016, 04:20:27 PM »

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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website (Server is back up). New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

Arlen

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2016, 12:31:13 AM »

My apologies for inserting a bit of poorly conceived humor into the bug's description yesterday, based on an old myth which there was no good reason to expect anyone to recognize. In my defense, I was still on post-surgery pain meds (alluded to in the post title  :) ).

Nevertheless, everything but the last sentence was essentially true. Fly fishers are very familiar with many stoneflies, particularly large ones like the Golden Stonefly or Salmonfly. But hardly anyone, fly fisher or not, has heard of the Cascades Stonefly (Doroneuria baumanni). This despite the fact that it is as large as a Golden, and an important food source for certain (non-fur-bearing!) trout in higher elevation rivers in the Cascades region. A few more pictures to illustrate:


A more complete view of the bug...

     



A typical Cascades river along which the adults may be found...

   



 To find the juveniles of the species one must submerge...

   



And check under and among the rocks on the bottom...

   



Among which also live the rainbow trout that eat the bugs--both juveniles and adults.

   


« Last Edit: October 01, 2016, 04:50:04 PM by Arlen »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2016, 09:19:06 AM »

Fascinating set, Arlen.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes    (A sampler of my new book is on my website.)
http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website (Server is back up). New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2016, 09:57:36 AM »

Fascinating set, Arlen.

...and the macros are really well done.

kikashi

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2016, 02:17:30 PM »

...and the macros are really well done.

Particularly the first. Really good use of DoF.

Jeremy
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Arlen

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Re: Half Stoned
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2016, 04:51:28 PM »

Thanks for your feedback, guys.
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