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Author Topic: A big B&W print - workflow, view to print  (Read 1726 times)

keithcooper

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A big B&W print - workflow, view to print
« on: September 25, 2016, 03:28:14 PM »

I've been lucky enough to have ongoing use of the Canon PRO-2000 printer I used for my review (it's a pre-release one but with firmware updates is pretty much identical to what is shipping) and after a recent trip to the North Yorkshire coast, I created a largish (22" x 43") B&W print of the harbour at Staithes.

I decided to document much of my workflow, right from deciding on a view and then deciding to use image stitching to get the effect of using a cylindrical projection rather than just a simple rectilinear one, through to actual printing.

Hope it's of some interest.

http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/staithes_bw_print.html

rdonson

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Re: A big B&W print - workflow, view to print
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2016, 03:53:47 PM »

Thanks, Keith. I really appreciate seeing you approach to a large pano.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2016, 06:34:43 PM by rdonson »
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Regards,
Ron

David Eckels

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Re: A big B&W print - workflow, view to print
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2016, 06:02:56 PM »

Well done and well taught. Thanks.

Paul Roark

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Re: A big B&W print - workflow, view to print
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2016, 01:31:07 PM »

... I created a largish (22" x 43") B&W print of the harbour at Staithes.

I decided to document much of my workflow, ...

http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/staithes_bw_print.html

Very nice work.  Thank you for the well written and detailed documentation.

I, too, am sold on stitched panos for large wall display.  In the past I mostly used matte under acrylic, but getting rid of the glazing is a major part of my effort now (with accessible dynamic range and weight being the main goals).  So, I'm looking at glossy substrates that are sprayed with Print Shield for protection.  At the moment glossy canvas (Innova's) and a baryta paper (Red River's) are my top candidates.

Regarding printing substrates, what are your current opinions as to the alternatives for these large prints, particularly for B&W photographers?  (And independent from the fact of having a large roll, which I really do appreciate the significance of.)

Regards,

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com
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keithcooper

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Re: A big B&W print - workflow, view to print
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2016, 02:04:59 PM »

Thanks Paul!

It's a tricky area at size with the conflicting requirements of quality/cost/practicality - that and the market for high end prints is pretty much non-existent in my area of the UK :-(  Just as well that print is not a meant to be a major contributor to our bottom line ;-)

Most of my larger works end up in commercial environments, so the Innova canvas is a popular choice.

Although I almost feel it would get me drummed out of the forum, I like using a 300gsm lustre paper laminated onto foam board with a matte finish laminate on top. This can then be dropped right into a frame made at the size needed.  It's a great way of getting some of my bigger 3 metre pano prints out there at prices that don't make office managers faint ;-)
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