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Author Topic: Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range  (Read 9776 times)

mr.dude

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« on: June 20, 2006, 09:27:05 AM »

Hi,  I'm looking to purchase a monitor calibration device up to the $200-$300 price range.  I see that there are a few choices available but I do not understand what the differences are between products and if some are better than others.  I am currently using a 19inch LCD that is decently accurate (comparing prints from a few sources) but has a slight warmish/redish cast that I can't seem to neutralize using Adobe Gamma and the Custom White Point feature (numeric input).  If there is a cheaper but still accurate device or method to calibration I'm totally open to hearing it (I've got an overwhelming list of expenses coming so any money saved will go a long way).  

Thanks
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DarkPenguin

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2006, 11:06:56 AM »

I like my monaco optix xr.
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ErikKaffehr

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2006, 10:49:44 PM »

Hi!

Colorvision has a couple of affordable calibrators ( http://www.colorvision.com/index_us.html ). There is also a new tool called "huey" from Pantone/Gretag Macbeth.

Best regards

Erik
Quote
Hi,  I'm looking to purchase a monitor calibration device up to the $200-$300 price range.  I see that there are a few choices available but I do not understand what the differences are between products and if some are better than others.  I am currently using a 19inch LCD that is decently accurate (comparing prints from a few sources) but has a slight warmish/redish cast that I can't seem to neutralize using Adobe Gamma and the Custom White Point feature (numeric input).  If there is a cheaper but still accurate device or method to calibration I'm totally open to hearing it (I've got an overwhelming list of expenses coming so any money saved will go a long way).   

Thanks
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digitaldog

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2006, 05:03:29 PM »

In that price range, I'd seriously look at the EyeOne Dispaly-2 from GretagMacbeth.
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r42ogn

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2006, 11:43:03 AM »

A word of caution, make sure that your monitor has the type of adjustments the package you select requires.  In my experience many LCD monitors don't have a full range of controls and some of the calibration packages don't work well without certain controls.  It's worth checking.  I use Colourvision Spyder and it works for me.




Quote
Hi,  I'm looking to purchase a monitor calibration device up to the $200-$300 price range.  I see that there are a few choices available but I do not understand what the differences are between products and if some are better than others.  I am currently using a 19inch LCD that is decently accurate (comparing prints from a few sources) but has a slight warmish/redish cast that I can't seem to neutralize using Adobe Gamma and the Custom White Point feature (numeric input).  If there is a cheaper but still accurate device or method to calibration I'm totally open to hearing it (I've got an overwhelming list of expenses coming so any money saved will go a long way).   

Thanks
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mr.dude

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2006, 09:52:45 AM »

i just looked at all the choices and now i'm getting more confused.  there are even cheaper $79 and $169 versions like spyder2express and spyder2suite.  i mean are the cheaper ones crap?  do i have to spend $200-$300 dollars to get accurate color and gamma?  sorry, i'm really lost with the calibration devices.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2006, 09:53:28 AM by mr.dude »
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digitaldog

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2006, 10:11:44 AM »

Quote
i just looked at all the choices and now i'm getting more confused.  there are even cheaper $79 and $169 versions like spyder2express and spyder2suite.  i mean are the cheaper ones crap?  do i have to spend $200-$300 dollars to get accurate color and gamma?  sorry, i'm really lost with the calibration devices.
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Usually you're getting "crippled" software with the same hardware. The Spyder line is confusing, I'd agree.
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Quentin

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2006, 03:00:00 PM »

A word about the Monaco Optix XR:  the device (puck) is great, but the software is less good.

I recently changed to using BasiCColor software instead of the bundled software, and the difference is night and day.  My flatpanel is now much more accurately profled.  Basic Color have a free trial download at http://www.basiccolor.de/english/index_E.htm  I hasten to add I have no connection with them, my enthusiasm being based entirely on personal very recent experience.

Quentin
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iconoclast

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2006, 03:25:04 AM »

I use PANTONE/GRETAG EyeOne Display 2. I paid less than US$ 200.

It works with CRTs, LCDs and laptop screens. It's a USB device. I can use it for measuring the ambient light level, but that's almost irrelevant. It allows me to leave the brightness of my monitor at a level that is comfortable for me (which is still within standard 75 to 100 candles). The software allows for an easy automatic calibration, in which case I don't need to touch any controls on the monitor, or for an "expert" input. At the end of the process it asks for naming and saving a new profile.

It works just fine for me, but almost as soon as I bought it I started thinking about buying a "real" calibration tool that would allow me to manage the color all the way from a camera or a scanner to a monitor to a print. Those devices usually are in the US$ 1,000 to 1,500 price range. They allow for the highest degree of accuracy and for additional "hand-tweaking" of a profile.

If anybody is interested in a professional opinion about calibration tools (and monitors, too), I suggest checking out this web site: ShootSmarter.com. I wish I had an access to that info before I chose a half-baked solution...
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Regards,
Rob

digitaldog

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2006, 08:26:25 AM »

Quote
If anybody is interested in a professional opinion about calibration tools (and monitors, too), I suggest checking out this web site: ShootSmarter.com
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=71592\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Much of the color management info on that site is way, way off so take whatever they say there with a grain of salt. This is the same site that used to recommend users set their display profiles as their editing space in Photoshop and still tell people there are no output color spaces (output devices) who's gamut is larger than sRGB. Wrong on both counts!
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pobrien3

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2006, 12:26:14 PM »

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...I recently changed to using BasiCColor software instead of the bundled software, and the difference is night and day.  My flatpanel is now much more accurately profled.  ...[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=70488\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Quentin, After receiving a printer profile created by a certain gentleman on this very thread, I have cause to question the accuracy of my monitor profile which was created with Monaco software and the X-Rite DTP94 puck.  It's close to the profiled test prints (closer than before I got the printer profile), but still not close enough.  I'm running two Apple Cinema 20" displays on a WinXP machine, Asus dual digital video card.  In what way did you find the BasiCColor software better?  Did you try ColorEyes, GretagMacbeth EyeOne Display-2?

Peter
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iconoclast

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2006, 02:33:49 AM »

Quote
Much of the color management info on that site is way, way off so take whatever they say there with a grain of salt. This is the same site that used to recommend users set their display profiles as their editing space in Photoshop and still tell people there are no output color spaces (output devices) who's gamut is larger than sRGB. Wrong on both counts!
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Andrew, thanks for letting me (us) know. I trust your opinion. Can you tell us what's your rating of input-to-output calibrating and profiling devices/systems (specific models)? I think I've read in some other thread or on another forum your post in which you've praised the Gretag/Macbeth EyeOne system?

BTW, I found a lot of your articles on color management. I always do that... I mean, I find an info that is critical to my making a purchase decision... after I make a purchase.  But, better late than never. I may even buy your book.

To everyone interested in the complex art/science of color management: here's a really useful link: [a href=\"http://www.ppmag.com/goods-productreview.htm]Professional Photographer Magazine[/url].  Go to the bottom of the page, where there's a lot of Andrew's articles.
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Regards,
Rob

Quentin

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2006, 03:11:22 AM »

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Quentin, After receiving a printer profile created by a certain gentleman on this very thread, I have cause to question the accuracy of my monitor profile which was created with Monaco software and the X-Rite DTP94 puck.  It's close to the profiled test prints (closer than before I got the printer profile), but still not close enough.  I'm running two Apple Cinema 20" displays on a WinXP machine, Asus dual digital video card.  In what way did you find the BasiCColor software better?  Did you try ColorEyes, GretagMacbeth EyeOne Display-2?

Peter
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Peter,

Better, as in generaly much  more accurate.  For example, some light greys were magenta with the Monaco software.  This problem was solved with the BasiCColor software.  Same hardware, different result with the better software.  Visually, my monitor now simply looks right.  Surprising, but true.

Quentin
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digitaldog

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2006, 08:33:26 AM »

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Andrew, thanks for letting me (us) know. I trust your opinion. Can you tell us what's your rating of input-to-output calibrating and profiling devices/systems (specific models)?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=71678\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I like the EyeOne Pro because it can do so much (displays, Projectors, output profiles, ambient light) and you can get the i0 to do auto scanning of targets (its awesome). Its easy to travel with too.
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pobrien3

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2006, 02:33:08 PM »

Thanks Quentin - I tried it and created a couple of profiles which came out pretty close to what I already had (I was calibrating at native white point for the ACD), but they looked too warm compared with prints.  Using BasICColor I re-calibrated to D65, and this is a far better match.  I like the software, though the downloading and demo activation was cumbersome and full of pitfalls for the unwary - I unwittingly downloaded the wrong licence and was frustrated for a while.

I'm going to do a test comparison with ColorEyes - can't see if there's a demo version of the GretagMacbeth software I can evaluate alongside them though.

Peter
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Jonathan Wienke

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Monitor Calibration Device in $200-$300 rice range
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2006, 02:26:57 PM »

I also like the EyeOne Pro spectrophotometer; I use mine to calibrate my monitors (LCD and CRT) and profile my printers, and have had excellent results all around. But I think it's out of the $200-300 price range, more like $1200-1300, depending on the accessories and software you get with it.
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