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Author Topic: Photoshop Image Processor Resize to Fit  (Read 1172 times)

dwswager

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Photoshop Image Processor Resize to Fit
« on: May 06, 2016, 11:28:38 AM »

This is a stupid question with major ramifications and I have yet to read it discussed anywhere.

Does the Image Processor resize to fit before running any selected action or after?

For example, I shoot a D810, but prep images for screen and so I might resize to fit 1920 x 1080.  There is a big difference processing a bunch of lower resolution images through some plug ins as opposed to running the 36MP images through and then resizing.  So from an quality standpoint and a throughput standpoint, it makes a big difference.
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dwswager

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Re: Photoshop Image Processor Resize to Fit
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2016, 11:45:00 AM »

Does the Image Processor resize to fit before running any selected action or after?

Apparently, it makes a big difference how you phase the querry because just as soon as I went back to looking, I found an answer.

The Photoshop Image Processor Resizes to Fit before running the designated action.

Of course, there are some tasks that would be better before (Noise Reduction) and some better after (sharpening).

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Redcrown

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Re: Photoshop Image Processor Resize to Fit
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2016, 11:55:53 AM »

Get Russel Brown's Image Processor Pro. It has more features and let's you specify whether an action should be run before or after the resize.

If won't let you specify multiple actions, some before and some after resize. For that you'll have to go to batch processing.

P.S. I don't think Russel is still maintaining his code, but the old version still available from his web site still runs OK on Photoshop CC.
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Tim Lookingbill

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Re: Photoshop Image Processor Resize to Fit
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2016, 12:15:10 PM »

Of course, there are some tasks that would be better before (Noise Reduction) and some better after (sharpening).

Your workflow leaves out a lot of specifics as to what you're trying to accomplish, so I'll just add that I downsize my 6MP images for web viewing and sharpen at the same time through Image Processor. Been doing it for years as far back as CS3. Never have to be concerned about noise appearance. It just doesn't show up and I know I have far more than what you get on that D810.

I utilize ACR's output sharpening set to Glossy Photo Paper/High along with capture sharpening settings in ACR as a dry run to see how it will look on screen at 100% as it will appear in a browser. If the sharpening isn't enough or is too much I adjust output sharpening to Standard or Low and/or if artifacts kick up I go back into ACR and adjust sharpening there with a decrease in Detail and increase to Radius.

You're dealing with a much higher resolution image than my 6MP which will require more aggressive pre-sharpening settings to override downsize softening which is basically what I'm doing above. Another image quality aspect about automating this way is that sharpening will affect color saturation and/or lightness after downsizing depending on how much high frequency detail like landscapes vs architectural buildings.

The only post work I want to do on a downsized jpeg for the web is in Photoshop's Sharpen filter fade blend set to 20-30% but I find I have to do that maybe on one image out of 1000.

I get quite a few comments from posters online saying how detailed my images are so I guess I'm doing it the right way for web viewing.
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