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Author Topic: Dip & Dunk film processors  (Read 1683 times)

design_freak

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Dip & Dunk film processors
« on: May 03, 2016, 12:03:38 PM »

Is there any company that manufactures "Dip & Dunk" film processors? Or where you can buy such a fully functioning machine? What do you recommend?


Thank you in advance,
DF
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Best regards,
DF

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Chris_Brown

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Re: Dip & Dunk film processors
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2016, 12:41:07 PM »

C-41: http://www.footprintsequipment.com/Results.asp?Cat=640

E-6: http://www.footprintsequipment.com/Results.asp?Cat=630

Various: http://cresimaging.com/filmandtubeprocessors.html

The lab where I work used a Kreonite for years with good success. They upgraded to a Refrema, which automated push & pull processing on a per rack basis. Both brands made a good product.

Dip & dunk processing uses a lot of chemical and nitrogen (used for agitation). All the baths must be kept full and up to temperature. When the bath heaters are turned off, it takes hours to get back up to temperature.

Roller processors were preferred in smaller markets. They have smaller baths, faster heat-up times and consume less chemicals. If you can keep the rollers clean & healthy you will get great results. AFAIK, roller processors don't use nitrogen for agitation, they pump chemical into/through the cavity as the film passes through.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 12:44:24 PM by Chris_Brown »
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donbga

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Re: Dip & Dunk film processors
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2016, 11:52:04 PM »

What do you recommend?


Thank you in advance,
DF

Forget D&D forever! You have to be processing huge quantities of film to even consider them. Same for continuous strand processors.

Kiosk sized operations still require a substantial volume of film to be processed to make these kinds of processors practical. I assume this is for a non-commercial environment.

Regards,

Don Bryant
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DanielStone

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Re: Dip & Dunk film processors
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2016, 05:52:55 PM »

Get a JOBO, and do one-shot processing. More consistent, unless you have the throughput, available space, time, and financing to support even a small D&D machine. A JOBO can do 35mm-->ULF formats(depending on the drum used), and the results(once fine tuned to your chemistry/process/etc) are better(IMO) than D&D processing. And no "clip marks" either :)

I've used mine for E6(6 bath Kodak kits), C41 and LOTS of B/W processing. Even processing some RC prints/proofsheets.

-Dan
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TonyW

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Re: Dip & Dunk film processors
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2016, 03:53:26 PM »

Is there any company that manufactures "Dip & Dunk" film processors? Or where you can buy such a fully functioning machine? What do you recommend?


Thank you in advance,
DF
You should think carefully about your needs and volume of film processed per week.  The dip and dunk processors I have commissioned are based on relatively large volume tanks (50+ litres) and require a large amount of dedicated space, including Nitrogen burst agitation.  These machines will always be replenished systems which will cause headaches for less than optimum film volume.  What sizes of film, quantity and which process (C41, E6, B&W) will dictate your choice of processor

The biggest problem is keeping the chemicals in good condition and should include monitoring on a daily or shift basis (Macbeth/ Gretag or X-Rite Densitometer).  On a replenished system you should be aiming to replace the developer volume once per 7-10 days maximum. 

This means that you need the volume of film at the recommended replenishment rate (usually quoted in M2 terms) to completely replace the tank i.e. on a 50 litre developer tank processor  and assuming that the rec. developer replenishment rate 50 ml per 35mm 24 exp film (or equivalent area) you ideally are looking at processing the best part of 1000 films per week to keep the system stable.  Smaller and certainly larger volume machines were/are available but the same volume rules apply.  I would imagine it difficult to find new machines so you may have to look used.

For smaller film volumes perhaps have a look for something like Nova tanks these can be configured to accept the number of baths needed by the process and hold low volume typically 1 litre or so, but again I think you will be looking used.

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