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Author Topic: pricing decorative landscape photos  (Read 3758 times)

Howard Smith

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pricing decorative landscape photos
« on: January 13, 2004, 02:19:34 PM »

Does the 100 pounds include the frame and matte or just your print?
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Howard Smith

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pricing decorative landscape photos
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2004, 02:43:42 PM »

My hunch is most of the 100 pound cost is wrapped u in frame, matting and the framers labor.  I assume the framer may be expecting a 100% markup, so maybe 50 pounds for the product. If you split the 50 pounds, you get 25 pounds.  Is that minus your costs worth it?  Can you live with (on?) that?

There ar at least a couple schools of thought here.  Sell at a lower cost/profit now to get your work out there and seen.  Raise the price later.  Some folks feel it is hard to raise your price once it has been set.  You may be a 100 pound per framed photo for a long time.
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markofjohnson

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pricing decorative landscape photos
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2004, 02:16:04 PM »

I'm sorting out to sell my panoramic landscapes of the local area (Lake District in the UK - a top tourist area) through a dealer who stocks the walls of many hotels, restraunts and pubs in the region. The format is 13x36" color archival prints, and the structure of the deal is I sell unmounted prints that are not limited editions to the dealer (who is a framer too), who then sells the work through the hotels etc as well as his small gallery. Would anyone care to offer pricing advice to me? Target price for the customer to buy the picture off the wall would be around 100 pounds. So what price should I aim to get from the dealer?

Thanks
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markofjohnson

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pricing decorative landscape photos
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2004, 02:23:20 PM »

The 100 pounds to the customer is for a finished framed photo, though for 100 pounds I might have to go with something smaller than 34" wide in order to keep the framing cost down. Big is always better though. As I'm not planning a limited edition, I'm thinking higher volume lower price.
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boku

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pricing decorative landscape photos
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2004, 07:03:13 PM »

In my neck of the woods, US Great Lakes, getting a nominal mounting, matting, glazing, and frame done WHOLESALE for THAT wide a print would cost well over $100. WHOLESALE.

Is the print matted? Glazed? It should be if this is serious.

Think of the time it took for that baby to run through your printer and all the materials and equipment it took to support it.

If I was on holiday, and saw a finished piece of that size that I liked, I would expect it to be priced around at least $300. More if the photographer was established. Much more if they were famous.

I'm not sure I agree with your low-ball pricing or the "bigger is better" philosophy. If you make any profit at all (I'm not seeing this) you will eventually be disenchanted with the adverse situation you created that is hard to undo.
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Bob Kulon

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