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Author Topic: Recommend Filters  (Read 3746 times)

Prismpic

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« on: February 21, 2006, 04:40:37 PM »

This is my first time purchasing filters, and there are so many (hoya, fuji, etc). is there a particular one that works best over the other?
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bob mccarthy

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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2006, 05:39:23 PM »

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This is my first time purchasing filters, and there are so many (hoya, fuji, etc). is there a particular one that works best over the other?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=58735\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

For what its worth, I am against filters for protection unless in a hostile enviornment. Your basically adding another element to the lens that was designed to operate without it. Two more air glass surfaces to add to flare, etc. A hard shade is protection enough, for me anyway. Use the lens cap except when shooting.

If you do use one, buy the best multicoated one you can find and keep it "clean".

Bob
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Prismpic

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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2006, 05:42:17 PM »

Bob:

Thanks for your great advice. It makes sense though. The real reason to purchase is for protection, so i guess it will not really matter which one, unless i choose to shoot with it. Thanks!!!
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Lisa Nikodym

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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2006, 07:36:51 PM »

If you want top-notch quality filters (though at a cost), three of the best brands are B+W, Heliopan and Hoya.  But as Bob says, be sure to get a multi-coated one for the best image quality.

There are two schools of thought on whether one should use UV filters for protection, or just rely on the lens cap & hood for protection to avoid degrading your image quality, and both sides of the argument are reasonable.  It's a matter of personal priorities.

Lisa
« Last Edit: February 21, 2006, 07:37:12 PM by nniko »
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Ray

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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2006, 09:16:19 PM »

I find from my own personal experience that one can sometimes over-mollycoddle one's lenses, to protect one's investment as it were, not realising that modern lens coatings really are very hard, durable and scratch resistant.
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DarkPenguin

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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2006, 09:33:31 PM »

Yep.  Still, there are times when you'd rather sacrifice a filter than a lens.   The spray from a waterfall once ate through the coating on my HMC hoya.  This wasn't a huge surprise since the it appeared to be a waterfall of Mankato's sewage.  Bleagh.
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CJD

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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2006, 07:03:19 AM »

Hi Bob

I'm with you on this.

In fact having a"discussion" about this very thing with a couple of people at the moment.

I vaguely remember MR writng a short piece about NOT using protective filters.

Can anybody remember where it was on LL (search failed) - or was it on a video journal.

Cheers

Chris
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francofit

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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2006, 06:00:23 PM »

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....Can anybody remember where it was on LL (search failed) - or was it on a video journal...
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I remember [a href=\"http://luminous-landscape.com/columns/sm-feb-05.shtml] The Filter Flare Factor [/url] by Mike Johnston and Understanding Polarizers a tutorial by Michael.  
I suppose you wanted to refer to the former (openly anti- protective-filters)
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Franco

dwdallam

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« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2006, 04:55:31 AM »

I use Hoya filters exclusively (price+quality) and have a full set of the UV Pro multicoated for each of the lenses. I don't care what people say about that. I'm not spending 1700 on an L lens just to scratch the MFer by being an ass in the field and dropping, scraping, etc., my dear, dear didn't eat for a month lenses.

And check this bit of technical information out. If you REALLY think you are getting a better picture with the UV filter off, you can u-n-s-c-r-e-w it in the field. I've done this numerous times while stacking/unstacking for variable light instances.

I can't tell any image degradation with or without, but I use the Hoya multicoated filters too. Multicoated filters are a necessary condition to avoid aberration or fringing also.

Last, you can't go wrong with Hoya. They are quality.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2006, 04:56:05 AM by dwdallam »
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