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Author Topic: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling  (Read 8679 times)

Pete JF

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Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« on: June 29, 2015, 03:49:45 PM »

Hi Folks,

Im sending off a few images for Web use and, until now, have only used this monitor (NEC PA272a) for printing.

Wondering what profile setups you guys are using for prepping images for web use?

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Mac Mahon

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2015, 04:19:35 PM »

Not all web browsers and user monitors around the world are colour managed.  Most monitors are limited to the sRGB colour space or something like it.

Most people advise converting your images to sRGB as you export for the web.  A kind of lowest-common-denominator approach.

Cheers

Tim
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Pete JF

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2015, 04:38:01 PM »

Thanks Mac,

Yes, I always do a conversion via 'save for web' in Photoshop..

Im just wondering if anyone using a calibrated system is using a profile specifically for prepping Web images..

The profiles I've used on this monitor up until now are pretty much print profiles.
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hugowolf

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2015, 09:06:57 PM »

Thanks Mac,

Yes, I always do a conversion via 'save for web' in Photoshop..

Im just wondering if anyone using a calibrated system is using a profile specifically for prepping Web images..

The profiles I've used on this monitor up until now are pretty much print profiles.

I don't see a point in specific profiles on the producer end for and image where you have no control at the viewer/consumer end.

Brian A
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Lundberg02

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 11:38:09 PM »

If your monitor is calibrated and profiled, that's all there is. if you want to enhance your sRGB jogs, go ahead and do it in an image editor.
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Royce Howland

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2015, 09:09:10 PM »

[...]
Im just wondering if anyone using a calibrated system is using a profile specifically for prepping Web images..

The profiles I've used on this monitor up until now are pretty much print profiles.
The web in all pragmatic terms isn't colour managed, so there's really no such thing as a profile to prep images for the web. The vast, vast majority of web-based views are on uncalibrated displays, and those that are calibrated you can't know what their profiles are. So just make images look the way you want on your colour managed system, convert them to sRGB, and send them off to whatever client or web sites. If a client needs something different, you can do that, otherwise there's generally no point doing anything else.

If you're extremely concerned about how your images convert to sRGB (say because you work with a lot of hyper-saturated colours in Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB which may not translate well to sRGB), you can soft-proof against sRGB and do some potential manual adjustments before you covert to that colour space. But realistically, that's polishing a cannon ball in most cases. I.e. not needed or useful. Just load the cannon ball into the cannon and fire it. :)

D Fosse

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2015, 05:42:20 AM »

I assume you mean calibration target.

The closest thing to a de facto web standard would probably be sRGB emulation, D65 white point and 120 cd/m2 luminance. The latter two assuming a more or less "normal" working environment. You should probably also drop black point to minimum (max contrast). That's where most people have it.

I have a separate calibration target for this purpose. I know there's no control over viewers' systems - but this should put it roughly in the middle of the bell curve.
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Wayne Fox

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2015, 01:39:19 PM »

I assume you mean calibration target.

The closest thing to a de facto web standard would probably be sRGB emulation, D65 white point and 120 cd/m2 luminance. The latter two assuming a more or less "normal" working environment. You should probably also drop black point to minimum (max contrast). That's where most people have it.

I have a separate calibration target for this purpose. I know there's no control over viewers' systems - but this should put it roughly in the middle of the bell curve.
I’ve brought this up before and while most seem opposed, I feel that while color management throughout most of those browsing the web is non existent, what I do know is what we choose to use as a setting to try and emulate printed ink and paper is a unique setup, and slight tweaks may hit a little closer to what you refer to the bell curve.  I know my display is warmer than most, and at 125 cd/m2 is probably much dimmer than nearly all of these uncalibrated displays through out the web.

What I tried to do was find an “average” adjustment that would make the images on my second display which was calibrated almost the same as yours offer a somewhat similar experience to what I see on the display calibrated for printing. I also use d65 white point, sRGB emulation, but I use 160 c/m2 as my luminance which I still feel is probably dimmer than the average display out there but is fairly “safe”.  The results are pretty minor so images see a slight tweak in contrast and density, and a slight shift to warm them up very slightly. The resulting images look fine on either display.

D Fosse

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2015, 03:29:31 PM »

This got me thinking a bit. If we all calibrate to match paper white - if only a generic paper - we should all be on the same page whatever the values arrived at. In an ideal world, this could work as common ground. Matching paper white is what we all do anyway.

In any case I'm not at all concerned about all the uncalibrated displays. That's their choice and they probably don't care all that much. As I've said before, it's their problem, not mine. So when I refer to the bell curve I really mean those who do calibrate and profile.
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AlterEgo

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2015, 05:26:44 PM »

I simply keep ipad w/ retina display and use it to estimate how things are when photos are destined to be seen by friends and family...
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David Eichler

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Re: Image Prep For Web - NEC PA272w and Spectraview profiling
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2015, 01:19:05 PM »

While Wayne's comments seem to make some sense, the brightness of the ambient lighting in the viewing environment can also play a significant role in how images are perceived, whether the images are displayed on a monitor or in print. So, what would "typical" viewing conditions be like when accounting for ambient light?

Personally, the only standard reference for me for Web viewing is my iPad, since that is what I am most likely to use for showing my images to others on a computer screen. For that purpose, it is most likely that I would process the images a little darker than what I would use for printing, but it will sometimes depend upon the image.

As for the color balance of typical monitors, with reference to mobile anyway, it seems to me that the color balance of modern Apple mobile screens starts off rather cool and gets warmer with age and use. So what could the standard be there? I just stick with the best color balance I can get on a high quality editing monitor.
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