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Author Topic: Film Stock for Film Noir  (Read 68169 times)

JB Rasor

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Film Stock for Film Noir
« on: May 31, 2015, 06:46:50 AM »

This is a very general and subjective question but hopefully the members can have some fun with it.
I'm going to shoot a film noir project on 8x10. Most of the shots will be artificially lit, I anticipate, as that's the quintessential aspect to film noir. Some may not be lit, if exterior, but I haven't gotten there yet.
My question is which film stock would be the best option, given the style I'm trying to capture? Think "The Third Man," or "Touch of Evil."
Since it's 8x10, and b&w, there are really only three options I see to choose from. I'm excluding Kodak's 320 TXP, unless someone feels otherwise. It comes down to Ilford's, FP4+ 125, HP5+ 400 or Delta 100.
I've only ever used HP5+ and I love the results but I've never pushed it in this way before. I'm also a newbie when it comes to large format, otherwise I'd probably have answered my own question. Anyways all, what'd ya say?

JB Rasor
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NancyP

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Re: Film Stock for Film Noir
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2015, 07:50:25 PM »

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donbga

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Re: Film Stock for Film Noir
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2016, 12:03:51 AM »

This is a very general and subjective question but hopefully the members can have some fun with it.
I'm going to shoot a film noir project on 8x10. Most of the shots will be artificially lit, I anticipate, as that's the quintessential aspect to film noir. Some may not be lit, if exterior, but I haven't gotten there yet.
My question is which film stock would be the best option, given the style I'm trying to capture? Think "The Third Man," or "Touch of Evil."
Since it's 8x10, and b&w, there are really only three options I see to choose from. I'm excluding Kodak's 320 TXP, unless someone feels otherwise. It comes down to Ilford's, FP4+ 125, HP5+ 400 or Delta 100.
I've only ever used HP5+ and I love the results but I've never pushed it in this way before. I'm also a newbie when it comes to large format, otherwise I'd probably have answered my own question. Anyways all, what'd ya say?

JB Rasor
Just stick with HP5+ and concentrate on your lighting chops. The grain from HP5+ will have a little more bite than other emulsions listed but that also depends on the developer you use. But keep the film/processing simple and concentrate on lighting and composition.

This is really a complex task and the film will be the least of your worries, IMO. I would test with a 4x5 back if you can. I also assume your your final output will be on paper.

Don Bryant
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