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 51 
 on: Today at 03:27:53 PM 
Started by henrikolsen - Last post by DtEW
It sounds like he drained the waste ink absorbers (parts 1, 2, 2 and 3) as shown on page 3-11 of the manual.  I think they're variously referred-to in the Service Mode section of the service manual as "waste ink box unit" and "platen ink box unit" (as a sometimes-technical-writer/editor, variations in terminology when there is no real need to... is an irritation to me).

The Service Mode portion of the service manual suggests that the printer keeps track of the usage of these consumable parts, which suggests that they are chipped.  Sometime there are provisions/tricks to resetting a counter (as there is for the maintenance cartridge of the iPF6100), but I don't see one for these for the iPF8300, at least not specified in the service manual.

I think the possible upside is that it suggests there wasn't a gross mechanical problem with the printer.

I think the possible downside is that it suggests questions as to how the printer was used/not-maintained.  We also don't know if he 1) changed out the parts (best), or 2) just emptied-out these waste ink absorbers via any number of ways that may range from complete solutions (eg. washing out and drying the absorbent pads, if they're anything like the maintenance tanks) to half-ass ones.  And we don't know if he's done anything about the usage counter, and what problems that might create.

11,000 square meters is ~820 rolls of 44" x 39' (111.8 cm x 12 m) of 44" fine art paper.  That gives me pause for any mechanical device.  It's like saying that a car should run fine forever if you just maintain it and give it all the necessary oil changes.  That's only (somewhat) true for the subsystems the maintenance regimens cover.  It is generally not feasible to engineer consumer goods in a way that all points-of-wear can be maintained.

Ultimately, what the risk calculus of investment vs. potential gain is something only you can determine.

 52 
 on: Today at 03:18:25 PM 
Started by Hening Bettermann - Last post by nirpat89
Turning this on the application simulates the papers white point as close as possible on screen.  Turning it off you will see the white point of your monitor under current conditions which will not be representative of paper white

I always had this thought:  Why is the paper (non)white not taken care of in the profile itself.  Doesn't the profile know what (255,255,255) is printed as and should it not be reflected when you do the soft proofing?  Why do other colors change when the "paper simulation" is turned on.  They too are the part of the profile, no? 

I am sure there is a simple answer...
 

 53 
 on: Today at 02:58:29 PM 
Started by Slobodan Blagojevic - Last post by Rob C
Well there were a few color photographers that preceded him that knew how to wheel a camera loaded with Kodachrome, such as Ernst Haas and Saul Leiter. They all had their own style and will be remembered for the outstanding work they produced without using Photoshop. Yes their darkroom printers coaxed out reproductions for them, many onto dye transfer, but the photographers opened the door for the rest of the world to see through their eyes and brains.

These photographers also knew how to make the most of film and associated techniques that utilized its shortcomings and chemistries and the way it responed to over- or underexposure. They knew all about copying and making sandwiches that you wouldn't eat.

Perhaps they also had the advantage of being of a time when the new was exciting, and not just seen as another boring old PS trick. Today's ease of manipulation has brought a limitless panorama, but at what cost to the sense of fulfillment of the photographer? If anything, I think that underlines the reasons for the success of people like Peter Lindbergh and Hans Feurer: their work looks, basically, to be honest and gimmick-free, even if highly polished.

 54 
 on: Today at 02:57:38 PM 
Started by opgr - Last post by elliot_n

So, an abstraction is a generalised representation of a specific entity. It seems however that a lot of visual artists in general and photographers in particular create non-representational art and call it abstraction. What then is it an abstraction of?


'Abstraction' refers to a detachment from the particular. So abstract thinking generalises from the world, whilst abstract painting avoids representing specific objects. 

 55 
 on: Today at 02:56:35 PM 
Started by Hening Bettermann - Last post by digitaldog

What the profiles are doing in terms of a soft proof:


•Simulate Paper Colorand Simulate Black InkOff: This produces the
relative colorimetric intent with Black Point Compensation.
•Simulate Black Ink: This produces the relative colorimetric intent
without Black Point Compensation.
•Simulate Paper Color: This produces the absolute colorimetric intent
(no Black Point Compensation).


 56 
 on: Today at 02:46:17 PM 
Started by Slobodan Blagojevic - Last post by donbga
His images are really strong and dramatic.  Looks as if he was years ahead of his time.
Well there were a few color photographers that preceded him that knew how to wheel a camera loaded with Kodachrome, such as Ernst Haas and Saul Leiter. They all had their own style and will be remembered for the outstanding work they produced without using Photoshop. Yes their darkroom printers coaxed out reproductions for them, many onto dye transfer, but the photographers opened the door for the rest of the world to see through their eyes and brains.


 57 
 on: Today at 02:39:39 PM 
Started by opgr - Last post by Rob C
I guess the Wiki definition is too narrow. It also clunks.

In essence, it's about as useful as a definition of art might be: not at all. Art and related things depend on interpretation and a certain vagueness; without that, they fall into prescription.

Rob

P.S.

Having witten this, I have to admit to a continuing - if not growing doubt - about our own thread on Abstracts for it is often anything but; it often falls - rises? - into mood or graphics, and I find it very difficult to accept they are compatible bedmates. Yes, I know it was a later, and conscious decision to make it the way it is now, but I don't think it has done anybody any favours by morphing into a GP unit of sorts...

 58 
 on: Today at 02:32:52 PM 
Started by Hening Bettermann - Last post by TonyW
No experience Photoline but in PS and LR yes turning on simulate paper does exactly that and attempts to display an image to represent what you will see in the final print

Your ICC paper profile will contain a White Point Tag.
 
Turning this on the application simulates the papers white point as close as possible on screen.  Turning it off you will see the white point of your monitor under current conditions which will not be representative of paper white

Attachment shows the effect of switching the simulation on or off

 59 
 on: Today at 01:58:22 PM 
Started by Hening Bettermann - Last post by Hening Bettermann
In a recent thread about screen to print match
http://forum.luminous-landscape.com/index.php?topic=120611.0

the question of simulating paper white was raised. In PhotoLine, which I use for editing, this option can not be chosen in the softproof dialog. On the german help forum, I asked if this option maybe was baked in and could not be de/selected. Here is the answer of one of the developers, my translation: (for those speaking German, the original thread is here: http://www.pl32.com/forum3/viewtopic.php??p=42757&sid=4825dfe9062dc5920d147aba4da8867a#p42757)

"Since I don't know what 'Simulate paper white' does, I cannot answer this. I can only tell you what PhotoLine does when softproofing (under Mac OS). 3 profiles are involved:
-the image profile (with its rendering intent)
-the profile for the device to be simulated [here: the paper profile of my print service]
-the profile of the output device (screen or printer) [here: my screen].

In the first step, conversion is performed from the image color space into the color space of the device to be simulated, using the chosen option for black point compensation and rendering intent.
In the second step,  the conversion is done from the color space of the simulated device to the color space of the output device, without blackpoint compensation. If the output device is the screen,  relative colorimetric is used as the rendering intent; other wise absolute colorimetric."

Question:
Does this procedure take paper white into account? And if not, what does the Photoshop option do?

 60 
 on: Today at 01:51:00 PM 
Started by uptownguydenver - Last post by Doug Peterson
New version of Capture Pilot is up on the App Store and should work with Feature Update 4.

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