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 1 
 on: Today at 03:23:37 PM 
Started by eronald - Last post by John Koerner
With the DSLR market in decline, however...
Putting all eggs in one basket comes to mind.

DSLRs are here to stay, IMO.

Modern cell phone technology makes Point-and-shoots obsolete, IMO (and low-end DSLRs obsolete as well), but not high-end DSLRs.

This is why I think Nikon is going in the right direction with their DL Series of high-end P&Ss. No cell phone will be able to do what these P&Ss do.

Nikon already totally dominates the DSLR market, in quality, if not in sales.

The only "outside interest" Nikon should pursue, IMO, is video capability as bcooter suggests.

Manufacturing a bunch of cheap, meaningless P&Ss is a waste of time ... P&S sales will continue to decline as cell phone cameras continue to improve.

Manufacturing industry-leading DSLRs, in the entry-, mid-, landscape-, and professional-capability departments is what Nikon does best, and if they bring their video capability up to speed, they will dominate this sector.

They already do in every way, except video.

They don't have to be the biggest, just the best, to be profitable.

They should stop wasting efforts on anything but their core competencies IMO

 2 
 on: Today at 03:11:25 PM 
Started by James Haswell - Last post by Doug Gray
That's why there's a color checker in that reference image.

It's definitely a good thing you provide that in one of your principal images Andrew. But for best comparison one really needs to print a ColorChecker image at the same size and in Absolute Colorimetric then trim the white edges to avoid perceptual white adaption. Makes a really good profile check.

 3 
 on: Today at 03:00:33 PM 
Started by James Haswell - Last post by digitaldog
This brings up the issue of having a "reference image." Something that Andrew, amongst others, often raises to check color management. It is a real need amongst photographers. The reason I harp on using a Colorchecker for that purpose is that it's really the only widely available physically existing thing that also has a digital "reference image" available.
That's why there's a color checker in that reference image.

 4 
 on: Today at 02:57:43 PM 
Started by eronald - Last post by Slobodan Blagojevic
... Nikon's only "failure" (IMO) is to try to be a huge giant, and dabble in "everything," rather than just sticking to what they do best: making the best DSLR cameras, and finest DSLR lenses, in the industry...

With the DSLR market in decline, however...

Putting all eggs in one basket comes to mind.

 5 
 on: Today at 02:56:25 PM 
Started by eronald - Last post by bcooter
I usually don't care about conjecture, but for a long time I thought something was strange with Nikon's offerings.

It's been obvious since the 5d2 that video is a sales offering for professionals and amateurs, whether they use it or not..

But Nikon, unlike Canon, Sony, Panasonic, doesn't  have a higher end video/cinema camera market to protect.

Nikon could have added any feature, in fact made the killer combo cam, but they didn't which is kind of strange considering the D90 was the first video capable dslr.

Also Nikon lenses have been used by indie and serious film production forever.  I can get a Nikon mount or adapter for almost any cinema camera.

I'm just guessing, but I think this is the problem of having one company (sony)  be the digital film for nearly every camera, except Canon, Leica sometimes Panasonic.

Once again, a guess, but Sony has kept their pdaf on sensor focusing for themselves, so maybe there is more than tech or marketing involved, maybe holding the good stuff back will allow Sony to become #2.

I mean why would Nikon offer their d5 with only 3 minutes of motion capture?   Nobody can shoot motion footage seriously at 3 minutes and ok, the Nikon does offer pdaf, but nobody talks about the video focusing and the crop is 1.5 which is fairly severe.

I thought I read somewhere that Nikon has a hook up with Samsung, so things could change, but not being at NAB was not a good thing for any camera maker because without a video/cinema/still offering a company is limiting themselves.

I''m basically brand agnostic and I know Canon doesn't get much love on these tech centric forums, but Canon has been pushing a full line up of 4k cameras for a while and though it seems they do the electronic sales thing of limiting features to bump you up a notch Canon seems to be covering as much territory as possible, with the exception of Sony, who seems to be playing with a larger deck of cards than the rest and Canon seems to keep on with their own sensors, though a little slow on the draw when it comes to upgrades.

I just get the feeling that most of this smells of contracts and not technical ability, but hey this is just a guess.

http://www.eoshd.com/2016/01/nikon-d5-versus-canon-1d-c-cinematic-4k-video-wins/


IMO

BC


P.S.   I was at a still camera rental house this week and they were loading up with new equipment.  I asked what and was told, "everything has to offer video and very little flash, a lot of continuous light", so maybe that tells us a little bit about the market.

Just a guess.



 6 
 on: Today at 02:56:16 PM 
Started by James Haswell - Last post by Doug Gray
Well, not clear whether he's focusing solely on repro or more generally on scanning a range of media hoping to get colour-managed results. Best he gets the whole workflow properly calibrated and profiled. I agree that scanning the ColorChecker is the correct next step, and I was going to also recommend this once I heard back on his view of whether the print of Andrew's chart comes out of the printer without a cast. We still aren't clear on that.

This brings up the issue of having a "reference image." Something that Andrew, amongst others, often raises to check color management. It is a real need amongst photographers. The reason I harp on using a Colorchecker for that purpose is that it's really the only widely available physically existing thing that also has a digital "reference image" available. It doesn't have to be.  And it's not fully adequate. There can be many things a good image or set of images can provide. Someone should provide matte and glossy prints together with matching reference digital images printable in RC to retain colorimetric accuracy, for people to check their color management. While gamuts vary, most of the variation is between matte and glossy. One could easily produce limited gamut images that fit 99% of glossy and matte printers in RC and physical prints of these to help photographers check out their color management.

Quote
While his scanning equipment and software may be well-designed, there are of course all the questions about whether it is being used correctly for a color-managed workflow from scan to print. If the scanner profile is not adequately matched to the media being scanned such results are quite possible, and I suspected from the beginning this is likely where the problem may be. But we only get to know this one step at a time.

 7 
 on: Today at 02:53:04 PM 
Started by graeme - Last post by GrahamBy
You just need to get yourself to Paris over summer:

http://www.jeudepaume.org/?page=article&idArt=2474

There may eventually be a catalogue...

 8 
 on: Today at 02:49:20 PM 
Started by MarkoRepse - Last post by MarkoRepse
up

 9 
 on: Today at 02:49:18 PM 
Started by Rob C - Last post by GrahamBy
Here you go, advice from a friend from a dark, wooded part of Mittel Euopa:

Advice for artists:
On the first Monday of each month, go to the nearest forest.
Be quiet and attentive, notice how the dawn dew reveals intense notes of crushed leaves and bergamote, and a delicate, sensual scent of fleshy, fragrant flowers emerges from the earth.
Create a work of art with the instruments of your choice (it can be a painting, a drawing, a polaroid, a sculpture, a performance or a sound installation).
Don't take a photo of it, and don't tell anyone about it.
Leave the work there, to the mercy of the elements.
Don't tell anyone where you left your work, and don't go back to it afterwards.
This should be performed as a monthly sacrifice to the goddess of inspiration.

 10 
 on: Today at 02:39:07 PM 
Started by subrata1965 - Last post by subrata1965
*** SOLD ***

1) Phase One DF

*** Still Available ***

2) Mamiya Wide Angle 55mm f/2.8 Autofocus Lens for 645AF: $399 -- shows signs of use, but very clean.
3) Schneider Kreuznach 80mm f/2.8 LS AF Lens for Phase One: - $1495 - is in Like New condition.
4) Mamiya 645 AFD Macro MF 120mm f/4 (Manual Focus): $500 -- is in Excellent condition.
5) Mamiya 75-150 f/4.5 D Auto Focus Lens for 645AFD: $1650.00 -- is in Excellent condition.
6) Phase One Schneider Kreuznach AF 110mm f/2.8 Leaf Shutter Lens:- $2750 is in Excellent condition.

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