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 1 
 on: Today at 07:15:19 AM 
Started by Dan Kehlenbach - Last post by Dan Kehlenbach
As I sent this, I received a note from Skylum.  I uploaded some DNG files for their review - hopefully they can come up with a fix.

 2 
 on: Today at 06:53:26 AM 
Started by Dan Kehlenbach - Last post by Dan Kehlenbach
Hello all,

Just encountered a strange problem with Luminar 2018 (Mac v1.0.2). The white balance, exposure, whites, blacks, and contrast in the Raw Develop filter doesn't appear to work with portrait-oriented DNG files. It works fine in landscape-oriented files. Has anyone else encountered this? I sent Skylum a note. Hopefully this can be looked at - I have thousands of files that I can't edit in Luminar.

 3 
 on: Today at 06:12:37 AM 
Started by Kevin Gallagher - Last post by Dan Wells
The tests in that particular BareFeats setup all fit within 16 GB of RAM - longer videos don't, large Lightroom catalogs don't, big panorama stitches don't... Swapping is not nearly as annoying as it used to be, because most Macs now use super fast SSDs (when buying non-Pro iMacs, stay away from HDDs and even Fusion Drives), but it does still happen, and it slows you down. I have one large panorama that runs a 16 GB machine out of RAM when I print it (it prints, but Lightroom needs to be restarted afterwards).

Lloyd Chambers at macperformanceguide has some (somewhat artificial) Photoshop tests that cause even a 32 GB machine to swap incessantly. He says that he hasn't figured out how to run a 64 GB Mac out of RAM as a still photographer. A friend of mine has an extremely large Lightroom catalog (accumulated over 15 years) that won't open on anything with less than 32 GB of RAM, and really wants 64 GB - he's looking at the iMac Pro. I suspect we'll eventually see big catalogs that want 128 GB - similar catalogs to my friend's, but with more high-resolution images in them. His catalog has hundreds of thousands of images, but nothing over 20 MP - what about a long-term catalog that has A7r mk II and III images? D850 images? Medium format?

Dan

 4 
 on: Today at 06:03:13 AM 
Started by fredjeang2 - Last post by fredjeang2
Thanks,

When I get time I'll try it.

BC

To Save precious time and avoid like the plague gazillion pseudo tutorials of dubious origin; and keeping in mind that the dudes at Affinity seem to listen to the pros and bring major updates very often (if it's not there today it will be tomorrow), it's best to stick with their official Vimeo channel.

LUTS to Resolve here:


OCIO here:



OpenEXR workflow here:


32bits workflow here:



3D Normal Map Pass here:


etc...

 5 
 on: Today at 05:37:30 AM 
Started by tom b - Last post by KLaban
The thing is, outside of a studio or other set-up shot, photographic opportunities rarely occur in isolation. If you're shooting landscapes, you'll frequently come across wildlife. If you're shooting architecture or cityscapes, you'll come across street photography opportunities. If you're off on a three-week shooting trip, documentary-style, you could come across almost anything.

Yup, great for the jack-of-all-trades.

 6 
 on: Today at 05:31:55 AM 
Started by Chris Sanderson - Last post by GrahamBy
I adore the bike photo, btw, dislocated bottom-bracket or not.

 7 
 on: Today at 05:27:58 AM 
Started by Chris Sanderson - Last post by GrahamBy
Speaking of literary equivalent, we have an author here who wrote a book called "stream of consciousness" which is several hundred pages of his thoughts void of punctuation and allineation. Unreadable and incomprehensible of course, which makes one wonder whether it should be called "stream of unconsciousness" or subconsciousness, depending on your believesystem whereby the latter might be a better fit for that experiment or Rob's picture for that matter...

Which reminds me of the book on "Grammar for the time traveller" described in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy... since no-one could actually read more than a few pages, "later editions were printed with the remainder of the pages left blank, to save printing costs".

Ah yes, Chapter 15 of The Restaurant at the End of the Universe:

"The major problem is simply one of grammar, and the main work to consult in this matter is Dr. Dan Streetmentioner's Time Traveler's Handbook of 1001 Tense Formations. It will tell you, for instance, how to describe something that was about to happen to you in the past before you avoided it by time-jumping forward two days in order to avoid it. The event will be descibed differently according to whether you are talking about it from the standpoint of your own natural time, from a time in the further future, or a time in the further past and is futher complicated by the possibility of conducting conversations while you are actually traveling from one time to another with the intention of becoming your own mother or father.

Most readers get as far as the Future Semiconditionally Modified Subinverted Plagal Past Subjunctive Intentional before giving up; and in fact in later aditions of the book all pages beyond this point have been left blank to save on printing costs."

 8 
 on: Today at 05:13:21 AM 
Started by tom b - Last post by shadowblade
It all comes back to the "wide shooting envelope" and the cost of extras to get the system shootable. which is something Michael Erlewine touched on. It isn't the camera that costs the money as we all know, it's the need to invest in the system, especially the lenses.

So settling on one versatile body which can serve several needs is very helpful- it lets one leverage the expensive lenses in multiple different shooting situations, and conversely means I don't feel so bad about investing in the expensive lenses knowing I can always try them out for unexpected effects in different shooting scenarios. For example it turns out that my favourite landscape lens is the 70-200 f/4 Sony, which I totally did not buy for landscape photography!

Same thing applies to a dual-camera setup. This is the other area where the 'balanced' body really comes into its own, complementing and providing backup for either the fast action body or the slow, high-resolution body, while using the same lenses, adding a lot more capability to the system for less than the weight of a typical lens.

The thing is, outside of a studio or other set-up shot, photographic opportunities rarely occur in isolation. If you're shooting landscapes, you'll frequently come across wildlife. If you're shooting architecture or cityscapes, you'll come across street photography opportunities. If you're off on a three-week shooting trip, documentary-style, you could come across almost anything.

If you mostly shoot non-action subjects at base ISO, adding a 'balanced' body (i.e. one 'balanced' and one slow/high-resolution) is a lightweight and easy way to get action and low-light capability, while providing a backup option with good resolution should your high-resolution body fail.

If you shoot sports and fast action, adding a D850 to the D5, or A7r3 to the A9, provides a far better option for long-distance action, where cropping is expected, and provides a 9-10fps backup option (which can even use the same batteries) should the fast body fail.

If you shoot wildlife, you can go with any two of the three cameras, depending on the expected animals, shooting distance and output size.

This is why top-tier bodies - whether speed-focused, balanced or resolution-focused - should never skimp on the autofocus. Ideally, they should be just as capable as each other. Fast action bodies shooting sports may be the classic use of autofocus, but a medium-pace body shooting 8-10fps is just as much an action body and needs to focus just as fast, and even the slow camera is useful for certain shots, providing extreme cropability for long-distance shots - the tiger stalking its prey in long grass, far away from the camera, the action occurring at the other end of the field from the camera. You don't necessarily need a high frame rate for these, but you do need fast, reliable autofocus.

It's also a failing of medium-format bodies for field use. They're fine if you're out shooting for one specific purpose and are prepared to ignore all other opportunities. Where other opportunities don't exist, they're obviously great (e.g. for studio use). But they lack the flexibility to take advantage of any opportunities which come up (e.g. long telephoto, UWA (12-16mm full-frame equivalent) or action shots), and the ability to share lenses with cameras which can - and most subjects ideal for MF captures tend to be static and can also be shot using multiple, stitched full-frame shots, for equal or better output quality, at the expense of a bit more post-processing required.

 9 
 on: Today at 04:37:16 AM 
Started by Chris Sanderson - Last post by Rob C
Wow! What is she on?

Spokes: it's the new thing.

Did Saul ride a bike?

Rob

 10 
 on: Today at 04:35:37 AM 
Started by Chris Sanderson - Last post by Rob C
I think neither of these bikes will go anywhere safely under normal configuration, regardless of snow or plastic bags, but I admit that even I had to look twice before I got that. It was however the reason for stopping to take a picture despite that it was still snowing. I couldn't quite figure out why the foreground bike was still there.


Ah! There appears to be a break in the frame just where the bottom of the V meets the drive/pedal stucture. Nothing like snow to provide perfect camouflage! Doping, obviously.

;-)

Rob

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